A A A print this page

Fall 2013 Courses

Department of Classical Studies

 

Classical Studies Courses in Translation (Readings in English)

CLST 2320-01 - Classical Mythology (4 cr.)
Prof. Jennifer Lewton-Yates
Western art and literature have their roots in Greek and Roman stories about gods and titans, awe-inspiring deeds and magical transformations. Today we refer to these stories as "myths." In this course, we will examine the Greco-Roman gods and goddesses, the heroes and heroines, villains and monsters, as well as major mythic cycles such as the Trojan War cycle. We will consider how myth shapes the works of Classical poets, artists, dramatists, and how those works, in turn, influenced later traditions. No prerequisites.
MWF 11; Th 9 a.m.

CLST 2730-01 - Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World (4 cr.)
Dr. Holly M. Sypniewski
Gay marriage?  People of antiquity were just as obsessed as we are with determining, regulating and legislating acceptable behaviors for men and women in their public and private lives. This course examines issues of sex, sexuality, and gender in the ancient societies of Greece and Rome through the study of literature and art.  Using an historical framework, we will investigate modes of sexuality and the representation of gender.  Our goal is to learn what we know, and what we cannot know, about the lives of ancient men and women, their interaction, communication and their roles in culture and society.  No prerequisites.
MTWF 8

CLST 2730-02 - Warfare and Society in the Ancient World (4 cr.)
Dr. David C. Yates
The tools and techniques of ancient warfare were crude, but effective. States like Assyria, Persia, Athens, Macedonia, and Rome managed to carve massive empires out of the ancient Mediterranean basin that shaped the course of ancient history. Each enjoyed the benefits and ultimately suffered the unintended consequences of the war-machines that made these empires possible. Athens and Sparta's obsession with warfare secured their freedom in the face of Persian aggression, but it also condemned them to a century and a half of constant conflict that left both easy pickings for Alexander the Great. Rome's legions were the most fearsome force unleashed upon the ancient world, but the power and influence held by the army and its generals were the ultimate undoing of this thousand-year empire. In this course we shall examine in detail the weapons, tactics, and strategies of ancient warfare, the ideologies and beliefs of the common soldiers, and finally the larger place warfare had in the various societies of the ancient Mediterranean, particularly Greece and Rome. No prerequisites.
TTh 1-2:40

CLST 3340-01 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (4 cr.)
Dr. Steven Smith
This course moves from the rise of philosophy among the ancient Greek "Presocratics" to the profound contributions of Plato and Aristotle and finally to the development of Western European "scholastic" philosophy in the later Middle Ages.  The root questions in the literature we study are:  What is real in the world and in ourselves?  And how is it possible to establish this? This course cross-lists with PHIL 3010-01.
MWF 11


Greek and Latin Courses that Fulfill the Foreign Language Requirement

CLST 1020-01 - Introduction to Greek II (4 cr.)
Dr. David Yates
Complete your Millsaps language requirement while learning to read, write, and think like an ancient Greek. The Greeks coined such terms as epic, democracy, philosophy, tragedy, and comedy. Their language was the original of the New Testament. Greek notions and words continue to influence us today the world over. In this course you will be introduced to grammar, vocabulary, and forms through a method that will have you reading and comprehending actual Greek within a few weeks. By the end of the semester you will have read excerpts from such literary masters as Aeschylus and Herodotus. Along the way you will also have an opportunity to learn about Greek culture and society, not to mention build your English vocabulary (particularly medical and scientific terms) with exercises focused on Greek root words. Prerequisite: Intro to Greek I .
MWF 10 a.m., Th 8 a.m.

CLST 1110-01 - Introduction to Latin I (4 cr.)
Dr. Holly M. Sypniewski
Complete your Millsaps language requirement by learning to read the classics that defined western civilization. Latin has left an indelible mark on the way we communicate, even today. This course uses a reading method to teach you the grammar, vocabulary, and forms of Latin. Our text follows the life of the poet Horace during the age of Augustus, so along the way you will also learn about Roman culture and society while building your English vocabulary! Students interested in law, medicine, literature, religion, modern languages, and (of course) antiquity may find this course particularly useful. Students with prior Latin experience must contact the department chair for Latin placement tests. NO PREQUISITES.
MTWF 9 a.m.

CLST 2130-01 - Catullus: Third-Semester Latin (4 cr.)
Prof. Jennifer Lewton-Yates
Finish your third semester language requirement by reading Catullus' poems –some so beautifully romantic that they continue to console the lovelorn even today and some so dirty and profane that grandmothers across the world are mortified. In this course for students who have just finished Latin I and II, we will strengthen your ability to read Latin through a close examination of one of Rome’s most interesting poets. Prerequisite: Two semesters of Latin or the equivalent.
MTWF 9 a.m.


Intermediate and Advanced Language Courses in Greek or Latin

CLST 3040/4040-01 - Greek Tragedy - Euripides: Intermediate and Advanced Greek (4 cr.)
Prof. Jennifer Lewton-Yates
This intermediate and advanced translation course will develop fluent Greek reading skills through translation of Euripides' Helen.  In addition to a careful examination of the play, students will explore the figure of Helen in the wider context of Greek literature and later traditions.  Who was the "face that launched a thousand ships" and why is Euripides' portrait of her so unique?  Intermediate readers (e.g. 4th through 5th semester) should take the course at the 3000-level. 4000-level courses are for advanced students (5th semester or beyond). Both classes will meet together. Prerequisites: Three semesters of college ancient Greek or equivalent.
TTh 10-11:15 a.m.; W 12 p.m.

CLST 4900-01 - Senior Seminar in Greek: Greek Tragedy - Euripides (4 cr.)
Prof. Jennifer Lewton-Yates
This advanced course fulfills the college's Senior Seminar requirement in Classical Studies. It will meet in tandem with CLST 3040/4040-01 listed above. In addition to readings in Greeks and in translation, students will explore their research topic on Attic law court speeches in greater depth and length. They will also write their Core 10 essay (Reflections on Liberal Studies). Prerequisites: Four semesters of college Greek or their equivalent.
TTh 10-11:15 a.m. and W 12 p.m.

CLST 3130/4130-01 - Roman Comedy: Intermediate and Advanced Latin (4 cr.)
Dr. David C. Yates
In this course we will read the works of the two comedic masters of the Roman stage, Plautus and Terrence.  In their plays you will recognize the classic gags that can still be seen in modern comedy from Shakespeare to Arrested Development.  Along the way we will develop reading proficiency in Latin and discuss the theater in ancient Rome.  Intermediate readers (e.g. 4th through 5th semester) should take the course at the 3000-level.  The 4000-level is designed for advanced students (5th semester or beyond). Prerequisites: Three semesters of college Latin or equivalent, or by permission of the instructor. 
MWF 8

CLST 4910-01 - Senior Seminar in Latin: Roman Comedy (4 cr.)
Dr. David C. Yates
This advanced Latin course fulfills the college's Senior Seminar requirement. It will meet in tandem with 3130/4130-01 listed above. In addition to the readings and compositions in Latin, students will develop their own research topic by studying a Roman comic poet in greater depth. They will also write their Core 10 essays (Reflections on Liberal Studies). Prerequisites: Four semesters of college Latin or equivalent. 
MWF 8


Core Curriculum Courses Taught by Classical Studies Faculty

IDST 1200-01 - Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World (4 cr.)
Dr. Holly M. Sypniewski
Gay marriage?  People of antiquity were just as obsessed as we are with determining, regulating and legislating acceptable behaviors for men and women in their public and private lives. This course examines issues of sex, sexuality, and gender in the ancient societies of Greece and Rome through the study of literature and art.  Using an historical framework, we will investigate modes of sexuality and the representation of gender.  Our goal is to learn what we know, and what we cannot know, about the lives of ancient men and women, their interaction, communication and their roles in culture and society.  Focus: Literature
MTWF 8

IDST 1200-05 - War and Society in the Ancient World (4 cr.)
Dr. David Yates
The tools and techniques of ancient warfare were crude, but effective. States like Assyria, Persia, Athens, Macedonia, and Rome managed to carve massive empires out of the ancient Mediterranean basin that shaped the course of ancient history. Each enjoyed the benefits and ultimately suffered the unintended consequences of the war-machines that made these empires possible. Athens and Sparta's obsession with warfare secured their freedom in the face of Persian aggression, but it also condemned them to a century and a half of constant conflict that left both easy pickings for Alexander the Great. Rome's legions were the most fearsome force unleashed upon the ancient world, but the power and influence held by the army and its generals were the ultimate undoing of this thousand-year empire. In this course we shall examine in detail the weapons, tactics, and strategies of ancient warfare, the ideologies and beliefs of the common soldiers, and finally the larger place warfare had in the various societies of the ancient Mediterranean, particularly Greece and Rome. Focus: History.
TTh 1-2:40 p.m.