Course Descriptions

ACCT- Accounting Courses

ACCT 2000 Principles of Financial Accounting (4 sem. hours). The basic concepts, systems, and terminology of accounting data in modern accounting leading to the interpretation for decision making by external users. The course emphasizes understanding of general purpose financial state- ments. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ACCT 2010 Managerial Accounting, Budgeting, and Systems Control (4 sem. hours). This course is a survey of principles of managerial accounting and controllership issues, including cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, absorption and variable costing methods, budgeting, perfor- mance analysis, and internal control systems. Prerequisite: ACCT 2000.

ACCT 3000 Intermediate Financial Accounting I (4 sem. hours). A focus on the conceptual framework of financial reporting that emphasizes the accounting model, the rationale underlying generally accepted accounting principles, and the external disclosure consequences of corporate decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 2000 and ACCT 2010. Offered during the fall semester.

ACCT 3010 Intermediate Financial Accounting II (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Intermedi- ate Financial Accounting with a focus on issues relating to the financial reporting by public cor- porations, stockholders equity, long-term liabilities, cash flow, and income reporting. Prerequisite: ACCT 3000 with a C or better grade. Offered during the spring semester.

ACCT 3040 International Fraud Investigation (4 sem. hours). The purpose of this course is to examine the nature, scope, and perpetrators of fraud as well as to identify effective prevention
and deterrence methods. Unlike most fraud examinations classes that introduce students to a wide variety of different frauds against organizations or consumers, this course emphasizes some more “specialized” types of frauds committed in the international community. Specifically, this course emphasizes historical investment schemes, namely the South Seas Bubble, currency counterfeiting, art forgery, and money laundering.

ACCT 3040EI International Fraud Investigation Abroad (4 sem. hours). The purpose of this course is to examine the nature, scope, and perpetrators of fraud as well as to identify effective prevention and deterrence methods. Unlike most fraud examinations classes that introduce students to a wide variety of different frauds against organizations or consumers, this course emphasizes some more “specialized” types of frauds committed in the international community. Specifically, this course emphasizes historical investment schemes, namely the South Seas Bubble, currency counterfeiting, art forgery, and money laundering.

ACCT 4000 Federal Taxation of Income (4 sem. hours). This course prepares students to ex- amine the sources of tax law relating to individual taxpayers and to gain orientation and practical experience in preparing tax forms and meeting filing requirements. Prerequisite: ACCT 2000 and ACCT 2010. Offered during the spring semester.

ACCT 4010 Auditing I (4 sem. hours). This course includes the environment of the auditing sec- tor in business and the role of auditing in society. Topics include the legal and ethical responsibili- ties of accountants, professional auditing standards, the acquisition, evaluation, and documentation of audit evidence, and reports on the results of the auditing engagement. Prerequisite: ACCT 3010. Offered during the fall semester.

ACCT 4020 Advance Financial Accounting (4 sem. hours). Financial accounting and reporting for selected non-corporate entities, such as partnerships and governmental units, and for multi-cor- porate or consolidated business enterprises. Selected accounting topics concerning multinational enterprises will be introduced. Offered during the fall semester. Prerequisite: ACCT 3010

ACCT 4030 Accounting Information Systems (4 sem. hours). Exposes students to analysis, de- sign, and evaluation of accounting systems with emphasis on transaction processing and the related internal controls for the major accounting cycles. Also included is development of systems, flow- charting skills, and exposure to advanced computerized accounting systems. Prerequisite: ACCT 3010. Offered occasionally.

ACCT 4040 Advanced Taxation (4 sem. hours). A study of the taxation of corporations, partner- ships, estates, and trusts. Prerequisite: ACCT 4000.

4060 Governmental/Nonprofit Accounting (4 sem. hours). Principles and applications appropri- ate to governmental and other nonprofit institutions. Emphasis is on budgeting and fund account- ing. Prerequisite: ACCT 3010.

ACCT 4900 Senior Seminar: Advanced Accounting Topics including International Account- ing Issues (4 sem. hours). This is a seminar course that examines the current professional account- ing environment and addresses issues to include reporting for consolidated business enterprises. Additionally, the course compares and contrasts U.S. accounting with other international models along major reporting areas. Course requirements include written group project reports and oral presentations by students. Prerequisite: Completion of junior-level accounting courses and enroll- ment in ACCT 4000 and ACCT 4010. This course is offered during the fall semester.

ACCT 4750–4753 Special Topics (1–4 sem. hours).

ACCT 4800–4803 Directed Studies (1–4 sem. hours).

ACCT 4850–4853 Internship (1–4 sem. hours).

ADMN- Business Administration Courses

ADMN 2000 International Business - Latin America (4 sem. hours). This is an intense course that requires students to travel and live in Latin America for at least a two-week period. Students are required to assess and understand geographic, environmental, economic, social-cultural, politi- cal, and legal factors that impact the business environment of Latin America. The course includes six hours of formal classroom instruction at Millsaps College before departure for the region, and an additional 38 hours of classroom instruction once in the region. In addition to the classroom instruction, the course provides experiential learning opportunities by requiring students to participate in field trips that expose them to the history and culture of the region, as well as to various leaders of business, industry, and government. Offered during the winter or summer terms only.

ADMN 2011, 2021, 2031, 2041, 2051, 2061 Trial Preparation and Practice First Term-Sixth Term (1 sem. hour each). Involves the study and practice of trial practice and procedure. Topics include preparations and delivery of opening and closing statements, direct and cross examination of witnesses, use of evidence and objections and preparing witnesses. The course will prepare the student for intercollegiate mock trial competitions, but credit is not limited to only those chosen to compete.

ADMN 3000 The Legal Environment of Business (4 sem. hours). An introduction to legal systems and the business-related provisions of the U.S. Constitution; to the common law of torts and business organizations; to administrative law and procedures; to regulatory programs involving labor, antitrust, and securities; and to the impact of foreign and domestic laws on international busi- ness. Prerequisite or corequisite: Junior-level B.B.A. Compass courses. Offered during the spring semester.

ADMN 4020 Business Law (4 sem. hours). Emphasis on Uniform Commercial Code sections dealing with sales, commercial paper, and secured transactions. Prerequisite: ADMN 3000 or per- mission of instructor. Offered during the spring semester.

ADMN 4050 International Business Law (4 sem. hours). This course introduces the international legal structures designed to regulate international trade and commerce. The student will examine the legal aspects of business with a particular emphasis on the effect of international law, trea- ties and governmental policies on immigration, labor, contracts, imports and exports, intellectual property, and international investments. The course will offer a comparative approach to the study of international law to demonstrate how various societal and cultural environments affect the ap- proaches to legal systems and the enforcement of those systems.

ADMN 4050EI International Business Law Abroad (4 sem. hours). This course introduces the international legal structures designed to regulate international trade and commerce. The student will examine the legal aspects of business with a particular emphasis on the effect of international law, treaties and governmental policies on immigration, labor, contracts, imports and exports, intel- lectual property, and international investments. The course will offer a comparative approach to the study of international law to demonstrate how various societal and cultural environments affect the approaches to legal systems and the enforcement of those systems.

ADMN 4060 Management of Nonprofit Organizations (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on competencies and knowledge needed to lead a nonprofit organization. Topics include nonprofit stra- tegic planning, board governance, legal compliance, fundraising, building strategic alliances, and assessing program and effectiveness. Pre-requisites: ACCT 2000, MGMT 2000, MRKT 3000.

ADMN 4750-4753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours).

 ADMN 4800-4803 Directed Studies (1-4 sem. hours).

 ADMN 4850-4853 Internship (1-4 sem. hours).

 ARTH- Art History Courses

ARTH 1000 Survey of Ancient and Medieval Art (4 sem. hours). A study of the development of art from prehistoric times through the late Gothic period. Offered in alternate years.

ARTH 1100 Italian Renaissance Art (4 sem. hours). A study of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 14th through the 16th centuries in Italy, set in the context of Renaissance thought and culture. Offered in alternate years.

ARTH 1200 Baroque Art (4 sem. hours). A study of European art of the 17th century, with special attention paid to Italian, Flemish, and Dutch painting and sculpture. Offered in alternate years.

ARTH 1300 Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Art (4 sem. hours). A study of European art of the 18th and 19th centuries in the context of an increasingly industrialized and middle-class society, with attention paid to issues of gender, class, and technology. Offered in alternate years.

ARTH 2000 Northern Renaissance Art (4 sem. hours). A study of painting from the 15th and 16th centuries in northern Europe, with special attention paid to the interpretation of symbolic im- ages. Offered occasionally.

ARTH 2100 Modern Art (4 sem. hours). A study of European and American art from Post- Impressionism to around 1970. Offered in alternate years.

ARTH 2200 Contemporary Art (4 sem. hours). A study of art from around 1970 to the present, with a special focus on new media and concepts as well as contemporary approaches to traditional themes such as landscape, personal identity, the body, and religious and political subjects. Offered in alternate years.

ARTH 2300 Topics in World Art (4 sem. hours). A study of selected topics in the art of Asia, Africa, and Latin America, either surveying key periods of two or three cultures or focusing on one of these areas. Offered occasionally. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic.

ARTH 2500 Museum Studies (4 sem. hours). This course will provide an introduction to the structure, operations, and social and political functions of museums. Topics will include funding, management, marketing, ethical issues, exhibition strategies, and educational outreach. We will also consider the practical, ethical, and legal issues related to the acquisition, handling, conservation,
and exhibition of museum objects. Offered in alternate years.

ARTH 2760-2763 Special Topics in Art History (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). May be repeated with different topic.

ARTH 3002 Museum Studies Internship I (2 sem. hours). An internship in which a student works at a museum, gallery, arts administration agency, or related site for at least 75 hours during the semester. Prerequisite: consent of art history faculty. Instructions for applying for an internship at the Mississippi Museum of Art can be found on their website: http://www.msmuseumart.org/ internships. You must submit a cover letter, application form, 3-page writing sample, two letters of recommendation, transcript, resume, and short personal statement by the specified deadline.

ARTH 3102 Museum Studies Internship Readings (2 sem. hours). A readings course in which students meet frequently to discuss museum-related texts with the art history mentor and other interns. Prerequisite: ARTS 3002 or consent of art history faculty.

ARTH 3200 Museum Studies Internship II (4 sem. hours). An internship in which a student works at a museum, gallery, arts administration agency, or related site for at least 100 hours dur- ing the semester or summer and writes a research paper on a museum studies topic. Prerequisite: consent of art history faculty. Instructions for applying for an internship at the Mississippi Museum of Art can be found on its website: http://www.msmuseumart.org/internships. You must submit a cover letter, application form, 3-page writing sample, two letters of recommendation, transcript, resume, and short personal statement by the specified deadline.

ARTH 3760-3763 Special Topics in Art History (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). May be repeated with different topic.

ARTH 3900 Junior Art History Seminar (4 sem. hours). An upper-level art history seminar focused on a different topic every fall semester, open to all students who have had a previous art history course, and strongly recommended for all junior art history majors.

ARTH 4900 Senior Art History Seminar (4 sem. hours). An upper-level art history seminar fo- cused on a different topic every fall semester, open to students who have had a previous art history course and required of senior art history majors.
 ARTS- Studio Art Courses

ARTS 1000 Beginning Drawing (4 sem. hours). An introduction to observational drawing using gesture, contour, weighted line, and structural line techniques.

ARTS 1100 Beginning Painting (4 sem. hours). Offers technical training in the use of materials and the basics of color and composition.

ARTS 1200 Beginning Printmaking (4 sem. hours). An introduction to printmaking techniques including intaglio and lithography, as well as issues related to two-dimensional design and content.

ARTS 1300 Beginning Sculpture (4 sem. hours). Explores a wide range of traditional sculpture media and techniques, including carving, modeling, and casting, and introduces issues of three- di- mensional design.

ARTS 1400 Beginning Digital Arts (4 sem. hours). Explores the use of digital media for artistic expression, with a focus on enhancing technical abilities and understanding related issues of design.

ARTS 2000 Intermediate Studio in Drawing (4 sem. hours). This intermediate-level drawing course varies in its specific focus. Topics may include figure drawing, color theory, and experimen- tal drawing. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: ARTS 1000.

ARTS 2100 Intermediate Studio in Painting (4 sem. hours). This intermediate-level course varies in its specific focus. Topics may include watercolor painting, acrylic painting, encaustic, and collage. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: ARTS 1100.

ARTS 2200 Intermediate Studio in Printmaking (4 sem. hours). This intermediate-level course varies in its specific focus. Topics may include woodcuts and monotypes, combination prints, color intaglio, and book arts. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: ARTS 1200.

ARTS 2300 Intermediate Studio in Sculpture (4 sem. hours). This intermediate-level course varies in its specific focus. Topics may include casting and mold-making, and installation art. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: ARTS 1300.

ARTS 2400 Intermediate Studio in Digital Arts (4 sem. hours). This intermediate-level course varies in its specific focus. Topics may include digital printmaking, video, and web-based media. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: ARTS 1400.

ARTS 2750-2753 Special Topics in Studio Art (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). May be repeated with different topic.

ARTS 3000 Advanced Studio in Drawing (4 sem. hours). Students will create their own body of drawings and engage in class discussions and critiques with advanced studio students working in other media. All advanced studio students meet together to encourage a broader understanding of art making and contemporary artists. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: ARTS 2000.

ARTS 3100 Advanced Studio in Painting (4 sem. hours). Students will create their own body of paintings and engage in class discussions and critiques with advanced studio students working in other media. All advanced studio students meet together to encourage a broader understanding of art making and contemporary artists. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: ARTS 2100.

ARTS 3200 Advanced Studio in Printmaking (4 sem. hours). Students will create their own body of prints and engage in class discussions and critiques with advanced studio students working in other media. All advanced studio students meet together to encourage a broader understanding of art making and contemporary artists. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: ARTS 2200.

ARTS 3300 Advanced Studio in Sculpture (4 sem. hours). Students will create their own body of sculptures and engage in class discussions and critiques with advanced studio students working
in other media. All advanced studio students meet together to encourage a broader understanding of art making and contemporary artists. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: ARTS 2300.

ARTS 3400 Advanced Studio in Digital Arts (4 sem. hours). Students will create their own body of digital images and engage in class discussions and critiques with advanced studio students work- ing in other media. All advanced studio students meet together to encourage a broader understand- ing of art making and contemporary artists. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: ARTS 2400.

ARTS 3650 Digital Arts Internship (4 sem. hours). An internship in which a student works with a firm or agency focusing on digital arts or graphic design for at least 12 hours a week. This intern- ship will count for the Digital Arts concentration in the Studio Art major, or for the Digital Arts minor. Supervision of a member of the Art faculty is required. Prerequisite: Consent of art depart- ment chair.

ARTS 3750-3753 Special Topics in Studio Art (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). May be repeated with different topic.

ARTS 3800-3803 Directed Study in Art (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours).

ARTS 3850–3853 Internship in Studio Art (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). An internship in which a student works with a museum, art agency, business firm, or artist under supervision of the Art Department. Internships may not count towards a major requirement, with the exception of the
internship in digital arts which is a requirement for the digital arts concentration within the studio art major and which must be supervised by a member of the art department. Prerequisite: Consent of the art department chair.

ARTS 3900 Junior Studio Art Seminar (4 sem. hours). An upper-level studio art seminar fo- cused on a different topic every fall semester, open to all students who have had a previous studio art course, with instructor’s permission, and strongly recommended for junior studio art majors.

ARTS 4900 Senior Studio Art Seminar (4 sem. hours). An upper-level studio art seminar focused on a different topic every fall semester, required of all senior studio art majors.
 AMSL- American Sign Language Courses

AMSL 1000 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture I (4 sem. hours). A study of the deaf community and beginning American Sign Language (AMSL) skills. The course introduces students to various sign methods, the linguistic structure of AMSL, the experience of deaf people throughout history, and the impact and importance of AMSL and deaf culture.

AMSL 1010 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture II (4 sem. hours). American Sign Lan- guage/Deaf Culture II builds on the skills learned in EDUC 1000 to improve communication and awareness of the Deaf community and culture. More emphasis will be placed on language produc- tion and spontaneous communication; field experiences at the MS School for the Deaf, supervised by AMSL II faculty, will enhance students’ abilities for effective communication. Prerequisites: EDUC 1000 or approval by the instructor.

AMSL II will be the second course in AMSL and is designed to fulfill the two-course language re- quirement required for all students in the new core curriculum. AMSL II further develops students’ basic language and communication skills acquired in EDUC 1000 and provides the foundation for the understanding of deaf culture.
ASTR- Astronomy Courses

ASTR 1000 Introduction to Astronomy (4 sem. hours). This course provides an overview of science’s current knowledge of the universe. From its beginning to its possible ends, the universe will be the topic of study. Students will not only learn what is known about the universe, but also will learn how it is that how these things are known. 
BIOL- Biology Courses

BIOL 1001 Introductory Cell Biology Laboratory (1 sem. hour). Laboratory course to accompany BIOL 1003: Introductory Cell Biology; introduces basic instrumentation and experimental strategies used to study modern biological concepts at the cellular level. Co-requisite: BIOL 1003.

BIOL 1003 Introductory Cell Biology (3 sem. hours). First in a three course core sequence for biology majors. An intensive examination of fundamental concepts of modern cell biology, including cell structure and physiology, molecular biology, and genetics. This course is a prerequisite for all other biology courses for science majors. Co- requisite: BIOL 1001.

BIOL 1011 General Botany Laboratory (1 sem. hour). Laboratory course to accompany
BIOL 1013; includes a survey of bacterial, protist, fungal, and plant diversity. Co-requisite: BIOL 1013. Prerequisite: BIOL 1001/1003.

BIOL 1013 General Botany (3 sem. hours). An introduction to the mechanisms of evolution and a survey of the structures, life processes, ecological interactions, and evolutionary relationships among archaea, bacteria, protists, fungi, and plants. Co-requisite: BIOL 1011. Prerequisite: BIOL 1001/1003.

BIOL 1021 General Zoology Laboratory (1 sem. hour). Laboratory course to accompany
BIOL 1023; includes survey of animal diversity, histology, and anatomy. Co-requisite: BIOL 1023. Prerequisite: BIOL 1001/1003.

BIOL 1023 General Zoology (3 sem. hours). An introduction to the morphology, physiology, and evolutionary relationships among invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Co-requisite: BIOL 1021.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1001/1003.

BIOL 1720: Galápagos Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation (4 sem. hours). An exploration of fundamental principles of ecology, evolution, and conservation biology, using the Galápagos Islands as a case study. The Galápagos’ special place in the history of science is considered from the works of Charles Darwin to that of contemporary scientists whose research on the islands and surrounding marine reserve have enhanced our understanding of the evolution of biodiversity. The cultural heritage of the Galápagos and the interaction between people and the natural environment of the archipelago are explored. Includes travel to Ecuador including the Galápagos. Does not count for the B.S. degree or for the biology major or minor.

BIOL 1730 Explore the Natural World (4 sem. hours). An introduction to science and the methods of science for students who are not planning to major in the sciences but are interested in learning more about the plants, animals, and other organisms around us, including their ecology, evolution, and relationships with people. Issues of global importance regarding the conservation of biodiversity are investigated using local examples as case studies. Does not fulfill requirements for B.S. degree or for a major or minor in biology.

BIOL 2001 Biomolecular Research Methods I: Molecular Genetic Analysis (1 sem. hour). Introduction to basic research techniques in molecular genetics and their applications, including restriction enzyme mapping, PCR, cloning, Southern blotting, and database mining. Prerequisites: BIOL 1001/1003 and either BIOL 1011/1013, or BIOL 1021/1023, or CHEM 1221/1223. Corequi- site: BIOL 2003.

BIOL 2003 Genetics (3 sem. hours). Historical/developmental treatment of theories of biological inheritance with emphasis on the process of scientific Discovery. Includes Mendelian, cytogenetic, bacterial, and molecular approaches to questions about the nature and function of genetic material. Prerequisite: BIOL 1001/1003, BIOL 1011/1013, or BIOL 1021/1023. Corequisite: BIOL 2001.

BIOL 2200 Ecology (4 sem. hours). Study of relationships of organisms with other organisms and their physical environment, including population, community, and ecosystem dynamics; includes laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 1011/1013 or consent of instructor.

BIOL 2220 Evolution and Systematics (4 sem. hours). Evidence for, and mechanisms of, evolution, including population, molecular genetics, and paleontology. History, philosophy, and practice of taxonomy and phylogenetics; nature of taxonomic evidence; includes a laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 1011/1013.

BIOL 3100 Histology (4 sem. hours). Microscopic anatomy of the different vertebrate systems, with an emphasis on basic tissue types; includes a laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 1021/1023.

BIOL 3200 Aquatic Biology (4 sem. hours). Physical and biological processes in aquatic ecosys- tems, both freshwater and marine. Emphasis is on natural ecosystems and the impact on them by the activities of humans; includes a laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 1011/1013 and BIOL 1021/1023. Offered occasionally.

BIOL 3210 Field Biology (4 sem. hours). Emphasis on ecology, community composition, and methods of field-based research. Summer program requiring travel. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Recent topics include ecology of the Galápagos Islands, tropical ornithology in the Yucatán, and biogeography and biodiversity of the American Southwest. Prerequisites: BIOL 1011/1013 and BIOL 1021/1023 or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 3301: Biomolecular Research Methods II: Molecular and Cellular Analysis (1 sem. hour). A research-based course focused on the development and analysis of genetically modified microorganisms (bacterial, fungal, or protozoan) and the effects of these modifications. Techniques will include microorganism culture, PCR, cloning, Southern and western blotting, light and fluores- cence microscopy, and database analysis. Prerequisites: BIOL 2001/2003; CHEM 1213 and CHEM 1223. Corequisite: BIOL 3303.

BIOL 3303: Molecular Cell Biology (3 sem. hours). An in-depth study of the molecular principles by which eukaryotic cells function, with emphasis on membrane structure/function, signal transduction, the cytoskeleton, and the cell cycle. Prerequisites: BIOL 2001/2003; CHEM 1213 and CHEM 1223. Corequisite: BIOL 3301.

BIOL 3310 Ornithology (4 sem. hours). Evolution, form and function, behavior, life history, ecology, and conservation of birds. Techniques for the study of birds will be taught in laboratory and field settings. Prerequisite: BIOL 1021/1023.

BIOL 3320 Biology of Terrestrial Arthropods (4 sem. hours). Evolution, functional morphology, ecology, conservation, and medical importance of terrestrial arthropods (arachnids, myriapods, and insects). Collection and identification of local fauna will be stressed in the laboratory; weekend- long fieldtrip required. Prerequisite: BIOL 1011/1013 and BIOL 1021/1023.

BIOL 3340 Biogeography (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the ecological and historical processes that are causally associated with distribution patterns in organisms. A broad array of topics including evolution, ecology, paleontology, geology, and climatology will be discussed; includes a laboratory Prerequisite: BIOL 1011/1013 or consent of instructor.

BIOL 3440 Human Anatomy and Physiology I with lab (4 sem. hours). An integrated study of the anatomy and physiology of vertebrates with special emphasis on human biology; includes a laboratory. The first in a two-semester sequence, this course covers the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 1001/1003 and BIOL 1021/1023.

BIOL 3450 Human Anatomy and Physiology II with lab (4 sem. hours). An integrated study of the anatomy and physiology of vertebrates with special emphasis on human biology; includes a
laboratory. The second in a two-semester sequence, this course covers the cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, endocrine, and urinary systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 1001/1003 and BIOL 1021/1023. Recommended: BIOL 3440

BIOL 3350 Conservation Biology (4 sem. hours). This course deals with the application of eco- logical, behavioral, and genetic principles to conservation problems, particularly the prevention of species extinctions. Specific topics to be discussed include global diversity patterns and processes, demographic processes, genetic constraints on population viability, the importance of keystone species and disturbance regimes, invasive species biology, the design of conservation reserves, and ecological restoration; includes a laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 1011/1013 and BIOL
1021/1023.

BIOL 3360 Arthropods and Public Health (4 sem. hours). This course will provide students with knowledge of arthropods of public health concern and will cover insects (lice, biting bugs, fleas, flies, roaches, stinging Hymenoptera), arachnids (spiders, scorpions, mites, ticks), and myriapods (centipedes, millipedes). The course will emphasize identification of arthropods of public health concern, lifecycles and natural history of these arthropods, the basic and specific nature of the relationships between arthropods and humans, identity of pathogens transmitted if the arthropod is a vector or transfers them by contamination, prevention of arthropod-borne diseases through control, treatment, etc., epidemiology of arthropod-borne diseases, symptomatology of arthropod-borne diseases, and symptomatology and treatment of bites and stings. Prerequisite: BIOL 1001/1003 and BIOL 1021/1023.

BIOL 3400 Comparative Animal Physiology (4 sem. hours). Comparative examination of eumetazoan organ systems and metabolism, with an emphasis on vertebrates. Laboratory employs current methods and instrumentation of experimental physiology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1021/1023. Offered occasionally.

BIOL 3430 Human and Comparative Embryology (4 sem. hours). An introduction to developmental biology through the study of human embryology. Emphasis will be placed on gametogenesis, fertilization, implantation, germ layer formation, and the development of the different anatomical systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 1021/1023.

BIOL 3510 Immunology (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of the human immune response. This course will include discussion of the immune response when faced with various challenges, including infection and cancer. Prerequisites: BIOL 1021/1023, CHEM 1213, and CHEM 1223. Recommended: CHEM 2110.

BIOL 3520 Microbiology (4 sem. hours). Study of the role of microbes in disease, industry and ecology, with special emphasis on the structure, metabolism and genetics of bacteria. Laboratory emphasizes common microbiological techniques. Prerequisites: BIOL 1001/1003 and BIOL 1011/1013 or BIOL 1021/1023.

BIOL 3600 Invertebrate Zoology (4 sem. hours). An in-depth study of the invertebrate phyla. Emphasis on morphology, life history, physiology, ecology, and evolutionary histories; includes a laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 1001/1003 and BIOL 1021/1023. Offered occasionally.

BIOL 3700–3703 Undergraduate Research (1–4 sem. hours). Under the supervision of a faculty mentor, students develop and carry out an independent laboratory or field investigation in biology. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

BIOL 3750–3753 Special Topics in Biology (1–4 sem. hours).

BIOL 3800–3802 Directed Study (2 or 4 sem. hours). Course is offered when a student needs a special subject covered to meet a professional requirement or wants to work with an instructor to look more deeply into a particular aspect of a discipline.

BIOL 3850 or 3852 Internship (2 or 4 sem. hours). Practical experience and training with selected research, educational, governmental, and business institutions.

BIOL 4902–4912 Senior Seminar (2 sem. hours each). A sequenced, two-semester (two hours per semester) capstone. 
 

CHEM- Chemistry Courses

CHEM 1000 Nutrition (4 sem. hours). This course will cover (1) the biological and chemical components of nutrition including cell structure and function, macronutrients (e.g., carbohydrates, proteins, fats, and lipids), micronutrients (e.g., vitamins, minerals, and trace metals), and their roles in regulating metabolism and energy production/consumption; (2) the USDA guidelines for healthy nutrition and how those guidelines were formulated; (3) pseudoscience and criteria for evaluating "fad" diets and (4) meal planning for the average person as well as those with nutritionally-affected health disorders (e.g., anorexia, bulimia, diabetes, celiac disease, food allergies, and others). Offered every spring.

CHEM 1213 General Inorganic Chemistry I (3 sem. hours). An introduction to the theory, practice, and methods of chemistry. Development of atomic theory, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, periodicity of the elements, stoichiometry, states of matter, and basic energy considerations. Offered every fall. Corequisite: CHEM 1211.

CHEM 1211 General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 sem. hour). A coordinated course (with General Inorganic Chemistry I) emphasizing chemical techniques, skills, and methods for qualitative and quantitative analysis of laboratory data and their limitations. Offered every fall. Corequisite: CHEM 1213.

CHEM 1223 General Inorganic Chemistry II (3 sem. hours). An introduction to the states of matter, solution and descriptive chemistry, equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics, oxidation and reduction, and electrochemistry. Offered every spring. Prerequisite: CHEM 1213. Corequisite: CHEM 1221.

CHEM 1221 General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory II (1 sem. hour). A coordinated course (with General Inorganic Chemistry II) to develop chemical techniques. Includes introductory qualitative and quantitative analysis. Offered every spring. Prerequisite: CHEM 1211. Corequisite: CHEM 1223.

CHEM 2110 Organic Chemistry I (4 sem. hours). First in a two-semester sequence in the application of chemical principles to organic compounds and the elucidation of their chemical and physical properties. Development of theoretical principles including product structure determination, reaction mechanisms, kinetics, stereochemistry, and strategies of organic synthesis. Offered every fall. Prerequisite: CHEM 1223. Corequisite: CHEM 2111.

CHEM 2111 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 sem. hour). A coordinated one-hour course (with CHEM 2110) emphasizing organic synthesis, separation techniques, spectral analysis, and testing of mechanism theory and relative rates. Offered every fall. Corequisite: CHEM 2110.

CHEM 2120 Organic Chemistry II (4 sem. hours). Second part of a two-semester sequence; a study of the more common oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and halogen derivatives of carbon. Emphasis is placed on structure, stereochemistry, preparation, chemical reactions, and physical properties and their relationship to the properties of biomolecules. Offered every spring. Prerequisite: CHEM 2110. Corequisite: CHEM 2121.

CHEM 2121 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1 sem. hour). A coordinated one-hour course (with CHEM 2120) emphasizing more advanced syntheses and use of instruments for separation techniques and spectral analysis. Offered every spring. Corequisite: CHEM 2120.

CHEM 2310 Quantitative Analysis (4 sem. hours). This course will cover the use of basic statistical methods to treat sample data. Theories and concepts studied include solution equilibria,

acid-base theory, oxidation-reduction, complexation, and solubility equilibria. Potentiometric and spectroscopic techniques are also introduced. Offered every fall. Prerequisite: CHEM 1223. Corequisite: CHEM 2311.

CHEM 2311 Applications of Quantitative Analysis (1 sem. hour). Gravimetric, titrimetric, and volumetric methods along with statistical methods to evaluate data are presented in the laboratory. Various unknowns are determined utilizing the basic techniques described above. The laboratory will also introduce potentiometry and UV-visible spectroscopy. Offered every fall. Corequisite: CHEM 2310.

CHEM 3110 Advanced Organic Chemistry (4 sem. hours). An in-depth study of major organic mechanisms, along with selected topics such as heterocyclics, polymers, and molecular orbital modeling. Stereochemical and mechanistic applications are discussed including their application to biomolecules. Offered occasionally in spring. Prerequisite: CHEM 2120.

CHEM 3123 Organic Spectral Analysis (3 sem. hours). Theory and practice of instrumental analysis of organic compounds. Emphasis is on interpretation of data from modern instrumentation. Capabilities and limitations of spectral analyses are considered. Offered every spring. Prerequisite: CHEM 2120.

CHEM 3210 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 sem. hours). A course designed primarily for students pursuing the American Chemical Society accredited degree in chemistry. This course is an overview of the principles of advanced inorganic chemistry, including applications of group theory and symmetry, molecular bonding theories, nomenclature, kinetics and mechanisms, organometallics, polymers, and advanced inorganic laboratory techniques. The course has a lecture and laboratory component. Offered every other fall. Prerequisites: CHEM 2120 and MATH 1220.

CHEM 3320 Instrumental Analysis (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the basic design and theory of operation for modern instrumentation. Topics to be covered include flame spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence and phosphorescence, IR, NMR, potentiometry, mass spectrometry, and an introduction to electro-analytical techniques. This course will emphasize the practical applications and limitations of each technique. A laboratory section is included in this course. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: CHEM 3410.

CHEM 3410 Physical Chemistry I (4 sem. hours). This course includes the development of theory and techniques used in kinetics and in thermodynamics and equilibrium of gases, liquids, and solutions (nonelectrolytes and electrolytes). The integrated laboratory includes experiments in the above areas. Offered every fall. Prerequisites: MATH 1220, CHEM 2310, PHYS 1003 or PHYS 1203.

CHEM 3420 Physical Chemistry II (4 sem. hours). This course includes quantum chemistry and molecular bonding and structure, as well as the history of the development of quantum mechanics. An integrated laboratory is included in this course and gives practical applications of quantum chemistry through the use of spectroscopy and other techniques. Offered every other spring. Prereq- uisites: CHEM 2310, MATH 1220, PHYS 1013.

CHEM 3520 Medicinal Chemistry/Pharmacology (4 sem. hours). An introduction to medicinal chemistry and pharmacology. Topics include: the history of drug Discovery; the modern drug Discovery process (modes of action; structure-activity relationships); drug targets: enzymes, receptors and oligonucleotides; pharmacokinetics; pharmacology; lead Discovery and optimization; pharmaceutical synthesis; and combinatorial chemistry. Offered every spring. Prerequisite: CHEM 2120.

CHEM 3610 Biochemistry I (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the structure, dynamics, and function of macromolecules: proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. Topics include replication, transcription, enzyme kinetics, mechanisms of enzyme action, and protein biosynthesis. Offered every fall. Prerequisites: CHEM 2120, BIOL1003, BIOL 2003.

CHEM 3621 Biomolecular Research Methods III: Biochemical Analysis (1 sem. hour). A research-based lab course with a focus on common biochemical techniques and analysis, applying skill developed in BIOL 2001: Electrophoresis, recombinant protein expression and purification, protein determination, size-exclusion chromatography, enzyme kinetics, and database analysis. Offered every spring. Prerequisites: BIOL 2001/2003; CHEM 3610; Corequisite: CHEM 3623.

CHEM 3623 Biochemistry II (3 sem. hours). An introduction to the basic concepts and design of metabolism. Topics include the generation and storage of metabolic energy, control of gene expression, the application of biochemical principles to physiological processes, and biological membranes. A laboratory section is included in the course. Offered every spring. Prerequisites: BIOL 2001/2003; CHEM 3610. Corequisite: CHEM 3621.

CHEM 3700–3703 Undergraduate Research (1–4 sem. hours). Library and laboratory research in special areas under the guidance of the instructor. Offered yearly. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

CHEM 3730 Environmental Chemistry (4 sem. hours). An introduction to environmental chemistry as applied to aquatic, atmospheric, soil and hazardous waste systems. Topics include environmental chemical cycles, aquatic chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, soil chemistry, environmental chemistry of hazardous wastes, and toxicology. Included in the integrated laboratory component is an overview of various environmental chemical analyses. Offered yearly. Prerequisite: CHEM 2120.

CHEM 3750–3753 Special Topics in Chemistry (1–4 sem. hours). Special areas of study not regularly offered for an organized class of interested students.

CHEM 3800–3803 Independent Study (1–4 sem. hours). Following the basic courses, this offering will permit a student to pursue advanced topics under the direction of the appropriate chemistry staff member.

CHEM 3850–3853 Internship (1–4 sem. hours). Practical experience and training with selected research, educational, governmental, and business institutions. Credit/no credit grading only. Pre- requisite: Permission of the instructor.

CHEM 4900 Literature of Chemistry (4 sem. hours). Processing and managing information from the chemical literature with oral and written presentations. History of chemistry and the proper use of chemical literature are included. Offered every fall. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 2120, CHEM 3320, or CHEM 3410. 

CLSC - Classical Studies Civilization Courses

CLSC 2000 Classical Mythology (4 sem. hours). Western art and literature have their roots in Greek and Roman stories about gods and titans, awe-inspiring deeds and magical transformations. Today we refer to these stories as myths. In this course, we will examine the Greco-Roman gods and goddesses, the heroes and heroines, villains and monsters, as well as major mythic cycles such as the Trojan War cycle. We will consider how myth shapes the works of classical poets, artists, dramatists, and how those works, in turn, influenced the later Western and Renaissance traditions. Offered occasionally. Prerequisites: None

CLSC 2010 Greek Legacy: Culture and Civilization (4 sem. hours). This introductory course begins its study of classical Greek civilization with the astonishing cultures of Bronze Age Greece and continues with an examination of the defining moments of classical Greek and Hellenistic civilization. We examine major historical periods, authors, genres, and artistic works to understand their impact on Greek civilization and their continuing legacy in the modern world. Offered in rotation. Prerequisites: None.

CLSC 2020 Roman Legacy: Culture and Civilization (4 sem. hours). This introductory course traces the 1,000-year rise of Rome from a cultural backwater to the undisputed master of the Mediterranean world. We examine major historical periods, authors, genres, and artistic works to understand their impact on Roman civilization and their continuing legacy in the modern world. Offered in rotation. Prerequisites: None.

CLSC 2030 Ancient History (4 sem. hours). A survey of the political and cultural developments from the origins of urban life to the dissolution of the Roman Empire. Offered occasionally. Cross-listed with HIST 3510. Prerequisites: None.

CLSC 2040 Classical Art and Archaeology (4 sem. hours). This course will focus on the changing vision of the world and human experience in ancient Greek and Roman art and the forms and techniques that artists created to represent that vision. We examine such shifts in perspective as classical to Hellenistic, small city-state societies to cosmopolitan civilizations, and idealism to realism. Offered occasionally. Cross-listed with ARTH 1000. Prerequisites: None.

CLSC 2050 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (4 sem. hours). A survey of the impact of classical philosophy upon the development of a largely Christian European culture. Offered occasionally. Cross-listed with PHIL 3010. Prerequisites: None.

CLSC 2110 Study Abroad Courses in Greece (4 sem. hours). A study-abroad course in Greece based on literary, historical, and material evidence. All readings are in English. These courses will have on-campus sessions in addition to field study. Counts toward major and minor requirements as a classical civilization course. Offered occasionally. Prerequisites: None.

CLSC 2120 Study Abroad Courses in Italy (4 sem. hours). A study-abroad course in Italy based on literary, historical, and material evidence. All readings are in English. These courses will have on-campus sessions in addition to field study. Counts toward major and minor requirements as a classical civilization course. Offered occasionally. Prerequisites: None.

CLSC 2800-4803 Independent Study (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours).

CLSC 2750-4753 Special Topics (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). 
COMM – Communication Studies Courses

COMM 2000 Introduction to Communication Studies (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the processes of mediated communication through analysis of the production and consumption of communicative acts and media texts and through an analysis of meaning within those acts and texts.

COMM 2100 History of the Media (4 sem. hours). Survey of the cultural histories of media in the United States, with focus on the development of media content, media technologies and media industries.

COMM 2200 Public Rhetoric (4 sem. hours). Students will study principles and strategies for effective oral communication. The course will emphasize principles and theories of rhetoric, while teaching students methods for researching, organizing, and delivering various forms of public rhetoric. It will also explore ethical, social, and political issues surrounding public address.

COMM 2400 Communication Ethics (4 sem. hours). A study of ethical issues involved in the creation and consumption of media products. This course will engage a variety of ethical theories and apply them to contemporary media issues. May be used to satisfy the historical/cultural/theoretical requirement for the major. Offered in alternate years.

COMM 2430 Journalism (4 sem. hours). This basic course teaches the skills of news writing and reporting, including the history and principles of journalism, and the techniques of layout and copywriting. Offered occasionally.

COMM 3000 Interdisciplinary Studies in Communications (4 sem. hours). Courses in this category cross disciplinary boundaries and are cross-listed with another department.

COMM 3100 Studies in Mass Media and Mass Communications (4 sem. hours). Exploration of a specific topic within the field of mass media and mass communications. Course topics change each time the course is offered. Offerings could include such topics as mass media and religion, the history of the alternative press, political communication, studies of the media audiences, mass media law and media, myth, and ritual. Prerequisite: COMM 2000 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 3400 Studies in Intercultural Communication (4 sem. hours). The specific content will vary, but this course will consider the relationship between communication and culture through study of communications within and between ethnic groups, social classes, and other communities. Topics could include communication between or within genders and racial/ethnic groups and ethnography and communicative environments. May be used to satisfy the historical/cultural/ theoretical requirement for the major. Prerequisite: COMM 2000 or permission of the instructor.
Offered every three years.

COMM 3450 Writing for New Media (4 sem. hours). An investigation of the approaches, styles, and challenges of writing in a Web 2.0 environment. Offered occasionally.

COMM 3500 Studies in Rhetoric (4 sem. hours). A focused examination of one model, theory, or theorist in the field of rhetoric. Course topics change each time the course is offered. Offerings could include the rhetoric of social movements, public rhetoric, religious rhetoric, or the work of a particular theorist such as Kenneth Burke. Prerequisite: COMM 2000 or permission of the instructor. Offered every three years.

COMM 3750 Special Topics in Communications (4 sem. hours). This course offers examination of fields within communications that are not covered by regularly scheduled courses in the communications curriculum. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: COMM 2000 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 3800-03 Directed Study in Communications (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). Students wishing to study a problem or subject outside the normal communications curriculum may pursue an independent study under the supervision of a faculty member. Permission of the department chair required. Prerequisite: COMM 2000.

COMM 3850-52 Communications Internship (2 or 4 sem. hours). Off-campus or on-campus professional experience in fields such as print or broadcast journalism, public relations, advertising, theater, or new media. Highly encouraged but not required of all students majoring in communications. Permission of the department chair required. Prerequisites: COMM 1000 and COMM 2000 (student may be enrolled concurrently in the internship class and the prerequisite courses.)

COMM 4900 Senior Seminar in Communications (4 sem. hours). This course is designed to help senior Communications majors acquire more advanced skills and develop more advanced critical thinking in the field of communication studies. 
CRWT- Creative Writing Courses

CRWT 2000 Introduction to Reading and Writing Fiction (4 sem. hours). An introductory course in the reading and writing of fiction, this course will be based on the workshop model and class time will be divided between discussing fiction by writers outside the class and by students in it. No prerequisite. Recommended: English 2000. Offered in alternate years.

CRWT 2100 Introduction to Reading and Writing Poetry (4 semester hours). An introductory course in the reading and writing of poetry. Class time will be divided between discussing poetry by writers outside the class and by students in it. No prerequisite. Recommended: English 2000. Offered in alternate years.

CRWT 2400 Introduction to Creative Writing (4 semester hours). Students will study the forms, techniques, and processes of fiction, poetry, or script writing by reading models and practicing their own writing. Students will discuss their own writing in the context of readings from traditional and contemporary works. The specific focus of the course will vary from year to year.

CRWT 3000 Advanced Reading and Writing Fiction (4 semester hours). An advanced course in the reading and writing of fiction. Class will be based on the workshop model, and time will be divided between discussing fiction by writers outside the class and students in it. Prerequisite: CRWT 2000. Recommended: English 2000. Offered in alternate years.

CRWT 3100 Advanced Reading and Writing Poetry (4 semester hours). An advanced course in the reading and writing of poetry. Class time will be divided between discussing poetry by writers outside the class and students in it. Prerequisite: CRWT 2100. Recommended: English 2000. Offered in alternate years.

CRWT 3200 Writing and Reading Creative Nonfiction (4 sem. hours). Students will read and study examples of published nonfiction (the personal essay, the memoir, etc.) and will write their own creative nonfiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 2400 or with the permission of the instructor. Offered occasionally.

CRWT 3750—3752 Special Topics in Creative Writing (1, 2, or 4 sem. hours). The topic of this course will vary from playwriting or screenwriting to creative writing in another genre or medium not regularly offered. The course might be offered by a visiting artist or scholar. Prerequisite: Either CRWT 2000 or CRWT 2100 or the permission of the instructor. Offered occasionally.

CRWT 3760–3762 Special Projects in Creative Writing (1, 2, or 4 sem. hours). This course is designed for students who want to pursue an independent writing project beyond work done in one of the established courses. Students must obtain permission of the instructor to register for this option.

CRWT 4900 Senior Workshop in Creative Writing (4 sem. hours). CRWT 4900 is the final course for creative writing majors and minors and is required of all students in the creative writing program. Students will complete a substantial semester-long creative project and engage in the reading of specimen texts in multiple genres. Offered in spring. 
 CSCI- Computer Science Courses

CSCI 1010 Computer Science I (4 sem. hours). An introduction to algorithms and computer programming. Basic programming constructs, data structures, recursion, and graphical user interface construction. Pre-requisite Math 1130 or eligibility of Math 1220.

CSCI 1020 Computer Science II (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Computer Science I. Topics include linked lists, stacks and queues, trees and graphs, sorting algorithms, algorithm analysis, data abstraction, and software engineering.

CSCI 2300 Data Structures and Algorithms (4 sem. hours). Algorithm design, analysis, and implementation. Topics include specialized trees and graphs, advanced searching and sorting, priority queues, complexity analysis, and algorithm design techniques.

CSCI 3500 Discrete Structures (4 sem. hours). Topics covered include predicate logic, algorithms, modular arithmetic, counting techniques, recurrence relations, graph theory, and trees. This course is the same as MATH 3560. Offered occasionally.

ECON - Economics Courses

ECON 1000 Principles of Economics (4 sem. hours). This course investigates examination of basic micro and macro concepts of economics, including the role of economics, supply and demand, price determination, demand and production theory, costs, competition, monopoly, the role of government in the economy, national income determination, the monetary system, and fiscal and monetary policy. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing is required. MATH 1210 or MATH 1220 is recommended.

ECON 2200 Economic Policy Issues (4 sem. hours). This course investigates various aspects of public policy regarding economic issues. Both macro and micro policy issues may be considered. Prerequisites: ECON 1000 and sophomore standing.

ECON 2200EI Economic Policy Issues Abroad (4 sem. hours). This course investigates various aspects of public policy regarding economic issues. Both macro and micro policy issues may be considered. Prerequisites: ECON 1000 and sophomore standing.

ECON 3000 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (4 sem. hours). This course studies the measurement and determination of the level of national income and output, aggregate demand and supply, inflation, unemployment, the theory of money and interest rates, the causes of economic cycles, and national economic policy analysis. Prerequisite: ECON 1000 and at least junior standing.

ECON 3010 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (4 sem. hours). This course examines price and output determination in markets, equilibrium, market intervention, externalities, the theory of value, production and cost theory, resource markets, and welfare and policy implications. Prerequisite: ECON 1000 and at least junior standing or consent of instructor.

ECON 3020 Money and Financial Systems (4 sem. hours). This course is a survey of both the microeconomic and macroeconomic aspects of financial systems, including market structure, behavior, and regulation of commercial banks and other financial intermediaries; the creation of money; central bank organization and monetary control; and policy issues. Prerequisite: ECON 1000 and at least junior standing.

ECON 3030 Econometrics and Applied Statistics (4 sem. hours). This course involves a study of the general linear regression model and the considerations associated with using that technique. Prerequisite: ECON 1000, MATH 1150, or consent of instructor, and at least junior standing.

ECON 3040 International Economics (4 sem. hours). This course extends and applies economic theory to international issues with an examination of world money markets, exchange rates, adjustment mechanisms, and issues. Prerequisite: ECON 1000 and at least junior standing or permission of instructor.

ECON 3040EI International Economics Abroad (4 sem. hours). This course extends and applies economic theory to international issues with an examination of world money markets, exchange rates, adjustment mechanisms, and issues. Prerequisite: ECON 1000 and at least junior standing or permission of instructor.

ECON 3050 Health Economics (4 sem. hours). This course provides an introduction to the micro-economics of health, healthcare, and health policy. Its main goals are to apply economic principles to health-related issues; to explain the social, political, and economic contexts of healthcare delivery; to explore the changing nature of health-care; and to analyze public policy from an economic perspective. Prerequisite: ECON 1000 and at least junior standing. Offered occasionally.

ECON 3060 Quantitative Methods (4 sem. hours). This course examines analytical and statistical tools useful in economic decision making. Topics will include data collection, data analysis, advanced econometric models, and the communication of quantitative thinking. Additional topics may include constrained optimization and simulations. Prerequisite: ECON 3030 and MATH 1150.

ECON 3070 Topic in Economics (4 sem. hours). This course addresses selected issues for firms in imperfectly competitive markets. Emphasis is on the choices facing firms when their business strategies are made in light of the likely responses of competitors and the factors that help shape market structures.

ECON 3110 History of Economic Thought (4 sem. hours). This course traces the development of economic thought from the classical school to the present time. Prerequisite: ECON 1000 and junior standing. Offered occasionally.

ECON 3120 Labor Economics (4 sem. hours). This course examines the organization, functioning, and outcomes of labor markets. Topics include wage and employment determination, labor market discrimination, the economic impact of unions, the worker’s investment in human capital, and the effects of regulation on firms and workers. Emphasis is placed on the compensation and incentives of workers. Prerequisite: ECON 1000 and junior standing.

ECON 3130 The Business of Sports (4 sem. hours). This course addresses various topics in the business of sports. Topics may include issues pertaining to stadium site selection and financing, the relationship between team and municipality, legal aspects of sports business, and other issues related to sports and society. Prerequisites: MGMT 3000, ACCT 2000, ECON 1000 and at least junior standing. Offered in alternate years.

ECON 3130EI The Business of Sports (4 sem. hours). This course addresses various topics in the business of sports. Topics may include issues pertaining to stadium site selection and financing, the relationship between team and municipality, legal aspects of sports business, and other issues related to sports and society. Prerequisites: MGMT 3000, ACCT 2000, ECON 1000 and at least junior standing. Offered in alternate years.

ECON 4901 Senior Thesis I (1 sem. hour). This is a research course and is the initial preparation of a thesis on an approved topic in economics that will be used as a part of the comprehensive examination for economic majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing, ECON 3000, and ECON 3010.

ECON 4902 Senior Seminar in Economics (2 sem. hours). This course includes discussion of selected topics in economics. Prerequisite: Senior standing, ECON 3000, and ECON 3010.

ECON 4911 Senior Thesis II (1 sem. hour). This is a research course in which the student concludes research begun in ECON 4901. It involves the final preparation of a thesis on an approved topic in economics that will be used as a part of the comprehensive examination for economics majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing and ECON 4901.

ECON 4750–4753 Special Topics (1– 4 sem. hours).

 ECON 4800–4803 Directed Study (1–4 sem. hours).

 ECON 4850–4853 Internship (1– 4 sem. hours). 

 EDUC - Education Courses

EDUC 1000 Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective (4 sem. hours). Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective examines continuity and change in individuals across the lifespan, including development in the physical, cognitive, and social domains. Emphasis is placed on development as a context-bound process, we examine how factors external to the individual interact with those within the individual to shape the course of development.

EDUC 3100 Early Literacy Instruction I (4 sem. hours). Concepts, materials, and teaching strategies for oral language development and systematic early reading and writing instruction specific to concepts about print, phonemic awareness, and phonics. Differentiated instruction and depth of knowledge are foci. Prerequisites: EDUC 1000, EDUC 3200.

EDUC 3110 Performance Assessment in Content Area Reading (4 sem. hours). A study of the concepts and statistical methods used in the assessment of content area reading, including the construction and use of classroom assessment instruments, standardized tests of intelligence and reading performance, RTI practices, and the use of statistics in the assessment of student learning and data analysis for informed decision making. Prerequisites: EDUC 1000, EDUC 3200, EDUC 3100.

EDUC 3120 Early Literacy Instruction II (4 sem. hours). Concepts, materials, and teaching strategies for oral language development and systematic early reading and writing instruction specific to vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension. Differentiated instruction, depth of knowledge, and RTI are emphasized. Prerequisites: EDUC 1000, EDUC 3200, EDUC 3100.

EDUC 3130 Education of the Exceptional Population (4 sem. hours). A study of exceptional individuals with special attention to the instructional needs of the child and adolescent. The course emphasizes the identification and remediation processes, differential diagnosis, IEPs, RTI, and etiologies. Prerequisite: EDUC 1000, sophomore standing or above.

EDUC 3200 Instructional Design, Implementation, and Classroom Management (K–12) (4 sem. hours). A field-based study of effective instructional and behavioral management techniques appropriate for elementary, middle school, and high school teachers with special attention to assessment guided instruction, differentiated instruction, brain research in teaching and learning, and best pedagogical practices. Prerequisite: EDUC 1000, sophomore standing or above.

EDUC 3250 Problems in Human Creativity (4 sem. hours). An exploration of social sciences based approaches to understanding, explaining, and enhancing creativity.

EDUC 3260 Practicum in Arts Education (4 sem. hours). In this course, students lead an arts enrichment program in the Jackson community. The course explores foundational thinkers on developing creativity and artistic sensibility in young people and incorporates topics such as child development and best practices of instruction.

EDUC 3270 Educating Future Leaders for Peace and Non-violence (4 sem. hours). A field- based course in which students implement a nonviolence program for children. The course will survey techniques for developing leadership, tolerance, and conflict resolution skills in young people.

EDUC 3280 Child Development in Context (4 sem. hours). In this field-based (CEL) course, students design and implement strategies to foster child self-regulation in classrooms at a local high poverty elementary school. The course examines the role of social context in child development with special attention to the ways in which classroom practices can reproduce or disrupt the inequi- ties associated with poverty.

EDUC 3290 New Media Literacies: Plugging In to Connected Learning (4 sem. hours). Students design new media learning experiences for K-12 partners while discussing various tools and theories underlying the effective use of digital platforms in meaning-making. Students will explore the importance of creating connected learning spaces to empower citizens to participate in the 21st century by recognizing the multiple nature of literacy practices.

EDUC 3840 Reading Diagnosis and Remediation (4 sem. hours). The ideology of reading problems, the assessment of reading skills, interpretation of assessment data, various instructional interventions, and implications for future student assessment and instruction are investigated. Diagnostic thinking and action research are reviewed and inform decisions regarding assessment, instruction, and recommendations for remediation. RTI in emphasized. Prerequisites: EDUC 1000, EDUC 3200.

EDUC 3850 Field Research in Reading (4 sem. hours). A model for field-based classroom research and RTI intervention in the schools that fosters the development of teacher candidates as scholars, leaders, and researchers. The course involves an informal reading inventory approach to teaching reading, and utilizing pre- and post-testing procedures with the monitoring of student progress. Prerequisites: EDUC 1000.

EDUC 3860 Advanced Practicum: Special Education (4 sem. hours). Offers students the opportunity to further explore areas of interest within the field of special education with special emphasis on the chosen exceptionalities for supplemental licensure. Disciplinary focus and field site placements are individualized. This course is required for supplemental licensure in special education. Prerequisites: EDUC 1000, EDUC 3200.

EDUC 4300 Reading Instruction Practicum (4 sem. hours). A field-based course emphasizing systematic, explicit instruction in developing vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension through assessment driven instruction. Prerequisite: Educ. 3850

EDUC 4500 Clinical Practice (16 or 12 sem. hours). Intensive field experience involving student teaching all day for a minimum of 12 weeks at an elementary, middle, or high school in the metropolitan tri-county area. Enrollment by department permission only.

EDUC 4750-4753 Special Topics (1–4 sem. hours). In-depth study of specific aspects of education, including K-12 literacy assessment guided instruction with response to intervention. Prerequisites: EDUC 1000, EDUC 3200.

EDUC 4901 Research in Education (1-4 sem. hours). Students contribute to the design, implementation, and dissemination of education research. Enrollment by permission of instructor only.

EDUC 4900 Educational Theory, Policy and Practice (4 sem. hours). The study of educational theory and the philosophies which underlie the development of curricula, instructional programs, and educational policy regarding the enhancement of literacy. Special attention is given to the relationship between educational theory, policy development, and modern educational practice. Pre- requisites: EDUC 1000, EDUC 3200, EDUC 3130.
ENGL - Literature in English Courses

ENGL 2000 Introduction to Literary Studies (4 sem. hours). This course is a prerequisite to most courses in the English Department. It focuses on a variety of interpretive problems and on different kinds of texts, including films.

ENGL 2010 British and American Literary History I (4 sem. hours). A history of British and American literature from the beginnings to 1800, with an emphasis on the meaning and development of literary history.

ENGL 2020 British and American Literary History II (4 sem. hours). A history of British and American literature from 1800 to the present, with an emphasis on the meaning and development of literary history.

ENGL 2440–2450 Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature (4 sem. hours). Courses in this category cross disciplinary boundaries and are cross-listed with another department. Possibilities include literature and history, literature and art, literature and philosophy, or literature and religion. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 3000 Literary and Cultural Theory (4 sem. hours). English 3000 introduces major trends in literary and cultural theory, demonstrating their utility for literary analysis, creative writing, and communication studies. The course is designed to deepen critical thinking skills and prepare students for advanced research and writing in the department’s three majors. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Offered annually.

ENGL 3100 Studies in Medieval Literature (4 sem. hours). This course is designed to introduce students to a wide range of themes, genres, and texts written before 1500. The specific topics will vary in different years, but may include the romance, women’s spiritual autobiography, cycle plays, or religious writings. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. This course or ENGL 3300 is offered in alternate years.

ENGL 3110 Studies in Renaissance Literature (4 sem. hours). This course will include the study of poets, playwrights, and prose writers of the Tudor, Stuart, and Commonwealth periods. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 3120 Studies in Restoration and 18th-Century Literature (4 sem. hours). This course will focus on a variety of themes and topics in literature from the English Restoration through the 18th century. The topics, which will vary from year to year, will include satire, the novel, drama, and Johnson and His Age. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 3130 Studies in 19th-Century British Literature (4 sem. hours). The specific content of this course will vary from year to year, with topics focusing on significant issues in Romantic and/ or Victorian literature. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 3150 Studies in American Literature Before 1920 (4 sem. hours). A study of the literary history of the United States, focusing upon the poetry, drama, and/or fiction of the Colonial and Federal period, on the American Renaissance, or on the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Course content will vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 3170 Studies in 20th-Century Literature (4 sem. hours). Students will read, discuss, and write about English-language literature of the 20th century. The specific content will vary from year to year, but possibilities include such topics as modernism as a literary movement, the modern novel, modern and contemporary poetry, and 20th century drama. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 3180 Studies in Contemporary Literature (4 sem. hours). Students will read, discuss, and write about contemporary English-language literature. The specific content will vary, but possibilities include works in such genres as fiction and non-fiction prose, poetry, drama, and film. The course may also emphasize such special topics as cultural or gender studies, literary history or theory, and may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered in alternate years.

ENGL 3190 Postcolonial Literature (4 sem. hours). Students will read, discuss, and write about English-language literature produced by writers from former British and American colonies or spheres of influence in Africa, the Caribbean, and South Asia.

ENGL 3200 Special Studies in Literary History (4 sem. hours). This course will involve the study of the transformations, transitions, and continuities in literary history. Specific topics will vary, but possibilities include the transition from Neoclassical to Romantic literature, the move from the Victorian to the modern period, or the development of American autobiography. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 3300 Chaucer (4 sem. hours). This course will consider Chaucer’s major works, including “The Canterbury Tales” and “Troilus and Criseyde”, in the larger cultural context of the 14th century.Special attention may be given to Chaucer’s experimentation with a wide variety of poetic forms. This course or ENGL 3100 offered in alternate years.

ENGL 3310 Shakespeare and the Play of Genre (4 sem. hours). This course will explore the poetic and dramatic career of William Shakespeare from the perspective of contemporary critical approaches, with particular attention to literary genre. Offered in alternate years.

ENGL 3320 Milton (4 sem. hours). With a primary emphasis on “Paradise Lost”, this course will consider Milton’s works and his career. Offered in alternate years.

ENGL 3340 Special Studies in Shakespeare (4 sem. hours). While considering a different set of plays from those offered in ENGL 3310, this course will explore areas of continuing relevance to literary studies. With Shakespearean drama providing our primary focus, the course may emphasize such special topics as gender studies, literary theory, history, or film. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: ENGL 3310. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 3350 Authorial Studies (4 sem. hours). This course will be devoted to the works of one or more authors, focusing on their texts in the context of their lives and cultures. Possible authors include Hawthorne, James, and Wharton; Joyce and Woolf; Faulkner and Welty; or Austen and Scott. The course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 3450 Writing for New Media (4 sem. hours). An investigation of the approaches, styles, and challenges of writing in a Web 2.0 environment. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 3500 Studies in Genre (4 sem. hours). This course will be devoted to studying genres such as the novel, the lyric, the short story, and the drama. The particular genre will vary from year to year; students may repeat the course for credit when the topic is different.

ENGL 3540 Film Studies (1, 2, or 4 sem. hours). This course will consider the cultural and artistic significance of film. The content of the course will vary, potentially emphasizing such issues as the relationship between film and another genre, films of a particular period or style, or the history of film.

ENGL 3760–3762 Special Projects in Writing (1, 2, or 4 sem. hours). This course is designed for students who want to pursue an independent writing project beyond work done in one of the established courses. Students must obtain permission of the instructor to register for this option.

ENGL 3750 Special Topics in Literature and Culture (4 sem. hours). The specific content will vary, but this course will consider the interplay of texts and their cultural or multicultural contexts. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 3800–3803 Directed Study in English (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). If students wish to pursue a subject or problem beyond the standard curricular offerings, they must plan such a course with an instructor and obtain that instructor’s permission to register for this option.

ENGL 3852 Internships in English (2 sem. hours). Under the guidance of an English Department faculty sponsor, students may elect to take up to two internships (each worth two semester hours), working in such areas as public relations, advertising, theatre, or journalism.

ENGL 4900 Senior Seminar (4 sem. hours). English majors are required to take this course designed to help students consolidate and build on their studies. 
 
 ENTR- Entrepreneurship Courses

ENTR 3010 Innovation (4 sem. hours). This course explores the innovation generation process. Creativity is at the root of innovation; thus this course calls for a strong creative contribution to enhance and encourage problem-solving skills. Students will identify strategic opportunities, engage in idea generation, and implement screening and evaluation methods. The outcome of this process will be a concept-ready offering set for business analysis. This course will also provide students with conditions in which to learn to communicate and solve problems in a task-oriented group.
Prerequisite: MRKT 3000. This course is offered in the spring semester.

ENTR 3020 Entrepreneurial Finance (4 sem. hours). Explore the theory, principles, and practical application of entrepreneurial finance which focuses primarily on the various alternatives for raising capital for start-up enterprises and companies which have not matured to the point of being able to go public if desired. The course will expose students to the various types and stages of private businesses and the critical role they play in capital, wealth, and job creation. Course will also address the legal, regulatory, tax, and valuation implications and challenges faced by these types of businesses. Prerequisite: FINC 3000. This course is offered in the spring semester.

ENTR 4010 Entrepreneurship (4 sem. hours). This course deepens the understanding of the entrepreneurial process by requiring a business plan on an original business idea developed in other entrepreneurially focused classes or on their own. Either as individuals or as a member of a small team sharing common business interests, students will research, create, write and present a plan for a viable business or nonprofit organization. Students will be coached by the instructor, and may also be matched to an appropriate entrepreneur mentor with experience in their area of interest.
Prerequisite: FINC 3000, MRKT 3000, MGIS 3000, ADMN 3000, or permission of instructor. This course is offered in the fall semester.

ENTR 4020 Entrepreneurial Investments (4 sem. hours). Explore the principles and practical application of evaluating private and entrepreneurial investments, including student exposure to actual current business investment opportunities as well as participation in actual entrepreneurial business practices. Students are exposed to a range of investment types including technology start-ups (intellectual property), real estate, franchised businesses, and others. Prerequisite: FINC 3000, MRKT 3000, MGIS 3000, ADMN 3000, ENTRE 3010, ENTRE 3020, or permission of instructor.

ENTR 4030 Entrepreneurial Internship (4 sem. hours). This internship course is available as a substitute for ENTR 4010 and/or ENTR 4020; however, these substitutions are made only with the permission of the course instructor for which the internship is substituting.
 ENVS- Environmental Studies Courses

ENVS 1000 Environmental Issues (4 hours). This course examines the historic balance between the earth’s systems and the influence humans have had on those systems. Non lab course. Offered alternate summers

ENVS 1100 Environmental Issues of the 21st Century (4 sem. hours). This course examines the historic balance between the earth's systems and the influence humans have had on those systems. Human population growth, climate change, water use and availability, modern agricultural trends, climate change, and energy are a few of the topics covered. Environmental issues are not solely rooted in science; students examine issues from economic, social, cultural, and political perspectives. Microsoft Excel based laboratory exercises help the student interpret, analyze, and draw conclusions from relevant datasets on population demographics, climate change, and energy.

ENVS 2001 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (1 sem. hour). Introduces technology known as Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students develop fundamental skills using GIS software and gain a greater appreciation of spatial analysis. The course is designed to enhance critical thinking and problem solving skills, and to develop a greater understanding of Geographic Information Systems as a method of inquiry.

ENVS 2000 Applied Ecological Design (4 sem. hours). An introductory course in sustainable homestead design taught at the Center for Research and Sustainable Living (CRSL) at the College's Biocultural Reserve, Yucatán, Mexico. The CRSL is an off-the-grid facility built using sustainable design and technology. The course focuses on topics critical to planning, designing, and creating a sustainable home. Topics include zone planning, sustainable construction, solar power, energy efficiency, water supply, waste and wastewater management, and agriculture/permaculture. Lectures will be augmented with field trips and on-site project experimentation, design, and construction.

ENVS 4911 Environmental Studies Seminar (1 sem. hour). An interdisciplinary colloquium in which students share the results of the environmental research, internship, or field course work they have undertaken as a requirement of the environmental studies minor. Ordinarily taken in the senior year. Prerequisite or co-requisite: field course, research course, or internship course approved by the director of the minor. Offered during the spring semester.
EURS- European Studies Courses

EURS 4000 European Studies Colloquium (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary research forum in which students pursue an individual, directed reading and writing project within their areas of concentration. This project will lead to the completion, during the spring semester of the student’s senior year, of an interdisciplinary senior thesis. Some form of financial aid may be available for certain European Studies programs. Students interested in financial aid for any of these programs should contact the financial aid office for more information. 
 

FINC- Finance Courses

FINC 3000 Principles of Corporate Finance (4 sem. hours). This course introduces corporate finance concepts. Emphasis is placed on financial decision making within the corporation in such areas as capital investment, capital structure, working capital management, and financing the firm. The student is also introduced to bond and stock valuation, and to the role of global financial markets including regulatory aspects. Prerequisite: ECON 1000 and ACCT 2000. Offered during the fall semester.

FINC 3900 Seminar in Portfolio Management (4 sem. hours). The course focuses on portfolio management, with focus on management and investments. Emphasis is on analysis of equity securities, fixed income securities, and derivatives in the context of portfolio management. Equity portfolio management is emphasized in the context of support of management of the General Louis Wilson Fund, the student-managed fund. The course requires readings, cases, field trips, projects, student research, and presentation.

FINC 4000 Advanced Finance (4 sem. hours). An advanced course in corporate finance. Selected topics include working capital management, risk analysis in capital budgeting, financing, mergers and acquisitions, international financial markets, derivative financial instruments, and capital market theory. Cases and projects are used in the course. Prerequisite: FINC 3000.

FINC 4002 Student-Managed Fund I (2 sem. hours). A course in the practice of portfolio management with focus on management of the General Louis Wilson Fund, the student-managed portfolio. Provides an opportunity for managing the investment of College endowment funds by utilizing economic, industry, and company analysis in the context of security valuation models. Combines the study of sophisticated security analysis and portfolio theory, management, and performance measurement. To be taken during the fall semester. Prerequisite: FINC 3900 or permission of instructor.

FINC 4012 Student-Managed Fund II (2 sem. hours). A course in the practice of portfolio management with focus on management of the General Louis Wilson Fund, the student-managed portfolio. Provides an opportunity for managing the investment of College endowment funds by utilizing economic, industry, and company analysis in the context of security valuation models. Combines the study of sophisticated security analysis and portfolio management with the practical demands of hands-on money management. Extends the study of portfolio theory, management, and performance measurement. To be taken during the spring semester. Prerequisite: FINC 3900 or permission of instructor.

FINC 4750 Topics in Finance (4 sem. hours). Several topics in finance will be considered on a rotational basis. Topics may include international finance, mergers and acquisitions, fixed income markets, speculative markets, international financial markets, and the management of risk. Prerequisite: FINC 3000 or permission of the instructor.

FINC 4750–4753 Special Topics (1–4 sem. hours).

 FINC 4800–4803 Directed Studies (1–4 sem. hours).

 FINC 4850–4853 Internship (1–4 sem. hours). 

 FREN- French Courses

FREN 1000 Basic French I (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the essentials of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structure. Primary emphasis on understanding and speaking. Secondary emphasis on reading and writing. Intended for students with no prior study of French. Offered fall and spring.

FREN 1010 Basic French II (4 sem. hours). Continuation of Basic French. Prerequisite: FREN 1000 or placement test score. Offered fall and spring.

FREN 2000 Intermediate French (4 sem. hours). Building on Basic French, this course focuses on the practical application of basic listening and speaking skills and expands students’ reading and writing skills. Prerequisite: FREN 1010 or placement test score. Offered fall and spring.

FREN 2110 Contemporary French Culture (4 sem. hours). This transition course concentrates on reading skills in a conversational classroom environment. It is designed to help students attain a level of linguistic proficiency and cultural understanding that will allow them to interact effectively with speakers of French. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 2000, or its equivalent, or placement test score. Required for all further study of French. Offered once a year.

FREN 2750 – 2753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours). Study of specific aspects of French literature, language, or culture at the intermediate level. Taught in French. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Taught primarily in our summer program in France. Offered occasionally during the school year. Prerequisite: FREN 2000, or its equivalent, or placement test score.

FREN 3200 Survey of French Literature up to the Revolution (4 sem. hours). A close study of the major works produced in France from the Middle Ages to the Revolution. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 2110. Offered in alternate years.

FREN 3210 Survey of French Literature after the Revolution (4 sem. hours). A close study of the principal literary works produced in France from the time of the Revolution to the present. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 2110. Offered in alternate years.

FREN 3220 French Civilization up to the Revolution (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on the art, history, literary accomplishments, and cultural aspirations of French-speaking people up to the Revolution. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 2110. Offered in alternate years.

FREN 3230 French Civilization after the Revolution (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on the art, history, literary accomplishments, and cultural aspirations of French-speaking people from the time of the Revolution to the present. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 2110. Offered in alternate years.

FREN 3750 – 3753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours). Study of specific aspects of French literature, language, or culture at the junior level. Taught in French. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: FREN 2110. Offered occasionally.

FREN 4750 Special Studies in French (4 sem. hours). Advanced, in-depth study of specific aspects of French literature, language, or culture, such as advanced grammar, Medieval, and Renaissance literature, 17th-century theatre, 18th-century narrative, 19th-century novel, and 20th- century theatre. Taught in French. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: FREN 2110. Offered as needed.

FREN 4800 – 4803 Directed Study in French (1–4 sem. hours). For advanced students who wish to do reading and research in special areas under the guidance of an instructor. Prerequisite: FREN 2110 and consent of the department chair. Offered as needed.
FYCS - Ventures or Connections
(First Year Courses)


FYCS 1010: Ventures in Problem Solving and Creative Practice & Integrative and Collaborative Learning (4 sem. hours). Courses explore a problem or tightly-focused set of problems. Students investigate relevant issues from multiple perspectives and propose possibilities for resolution. The students engage in project-based work, collaborative learning, creative risk-taking, and adaptive strategies for problem-solving. Course topics will be diverse and from a variety of disciplines. Offered every Fall.

FYCSFA 1010: Ventures in Problem Solving and Creative Practice & Integrative and Collaborative Learning with Focus on Fine Arts (4 sem. hours). Courses explore a problem or tightly-focused set of problems, with a focus on Fine Arts. Students investigate relevant issues from multiple perspectives and propose possibilities for resolution. The students engage in project-based work, collaborative learning, creative risk-taking, and adaptive strategies for problem-solving. Course topics will be diverse and from a variety of disciplines. Offered every Fall.

FYCSTEM 1010: Ventures in Problem Solving and Creative Practice & Integrative and Collaborative Learning with Focus on STEM (4 sem. hours). Courses explore a problem or tightly- focused set of problems, with a focus on STEM. Students investigate relevant issues from multiple perspectives and propose possibilities for resolution. The students engage in project-based work, collaborative learning, creative risk-taking, and adaptive strategies for problem-solving. Course topics will be diverse and from a variety of disciplines. Offered every Fall.

FYCSOC 1010: Ventures in Problem Solving and Creative Practice & Integrative and Collaborative Learning with Focus on Social World (4 sem. hours). Courses explore a problem or tightly-focused set of problems, with a focus on the Social World. Students investigate relevant issues from multiple perspectives and propose possibilities for resolution. The students engage in project-based work, collaborative learning, creative risk-taking, and adaptive strategies for problem-solving. Course topics will be diverse and from a variety of disciplines. Offered every Fall.

FYCS 1020: Connections in Communication in Humanities Context (4. sem hours). The distinctive goals of the FYCS 1020 are complementary to the distinctive goals of the Our Human Heritage program. The Our Human Heritage program constructs a large-scale historical frame-work by examining multiple historical contexts and drawing on multiple humanities disciplines; in contrast, FYCS 1020 addresses a specific topic situated within a single humanities discipline and in the topic’s historical context. Students will create formal and informal communication products that demonstrate critical listening, reading, and, where appropriate, aural and visual comprehension of course material. Offered every Spring.

FYCSFA 1020: Connections in a Communication in Humanities Context with Focus on Fine Arts (4. sem hours). The distinctive goals of the FYCS 1020 are complementary to the distinctive goals of the Our Human Heritage program. The Our Human Heritage program constructs a large-scale historical framework by examining multiple historical contexts and drawing on multiple humanities disciplines; in contrast, FYCS 1020 addresses a specific topic situated within a single humanities discipline and in the topic’s historical context. FYCSFA 1020 is specifically focused on the Fine Arts. Students will create formal and informal communication products that demonstrate critical listening, reading, and, where appropriate, aural and visual comprehension of course material. Offered every Spring.
FYHH- First Year Our Human Heritage Courses

FYHH 1010: First Year Our Human Heritage (4 sem. hours). This course is a humanities-based, interdisciplinary exploration of human experience and world cultures throughout history, considering intellectual development, artistic expression, social and cultural evolution, from pre-history until the present. The course will develop skills for seeking, understanding, and interpreting cultural phenomena across numerous human contexts. Offered every Fall.

FYHH 1020: First Year Our Human Heritage (4 sem. hours). This course is a humanities-based, interdisciplinary exploration of human experience and world cultures throughout history, considering intellectual development, artistic expression, social and cultural evolution, from pre-history until the present. The course will develop skills for seeking, understanding, and interpreting cultural phenomena across numerous human contexts. Offered every Spring. 
GEOL-Geology Courses

GEOL 1000 The Physical Earth (4 sem. hours). Study of the earth, including earth material properties, surface erosional and depositional processes, and earth interior processes.

GEOL 1200 Geosystems (4 sem. hours). This course explores the fundamental characteristics of Earth’s major systems. Emphasis is placed on identifying synergies between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere which combine to form the biosphere.

GEOL 1300 Human and Natural Disasters (4 sem. hours). The study of Earth resources, systems, and processes from a natural hazard perspective. Primary focus is on geologic and climatic disasters, but where appropriate human and technological disasters will be investigated.

GEOL 2000 Plate Tectonics and Earth History (4 sem. hours). Study of successive events leading to the present configuration of the continental masses, the evolution and development of life, and the kinds and distribution of rocks and minerals, all viewed using the framework of the theory of plate tectonics. Prerequisite: Introductory (1000-level) geology course.

GEOL 2100 Hydrology and Chemistry of Natural Waters (4 sem. hours). A comprehensive study of the occurrence, distribution, and geochemical processes of natural waters. Topics include: Hydrologic cycle, Darcy’s Law, groundwater flow in confined and unconfined aquifers, stream flow, the effects of common forms of pollution on the natural system, current environmental regulations, and remediation technologies. Prerequisite: Introductory (1000-level) geology course.

GEOL 2200 Process Geomorphology (4 sem. hours). A comprehensive approach to studying the processes that shape Earth’s surface and the resulting landforms; their origin, evolution, form, and spatial distribution. In this class, students will explore the Earth’s surface while applying two approaches: first a descriptive approach, in which landforms are considered as indicators of geologic age, and second, a quantitative analysis of landform morphology and field measurement of geomorphic processes. Prerequisite: Introductory (1000-level) geology course.

GEOL 3000 Sedimentary Geology (4 sem. hours). Rock sequences, lithologic and paleontologic facies of various parts of the United States, and basic sedimentological principles. Field trips are required. Prerequisite: GEOL 2000.

GEOL 3100 Solid Earth Geophysics (4 sem. hours). Introduction to the fundamentals of geophysics and geophysical exploration (controlled-source seismology, earthquake seismology, gravity, magnetics, and heat flow). Specific observations illustrate how each technique constrains certain aspects of the plate tectonic framework that is fundamental to the study of the earth. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOL 3200 Subsurface Mapping and Resource Evaluation (4 sem. hours). Discipline-oriented objectives presented in this course aid in the interpretation and description of geologic features presented on maps and cross sections. The student will learn to analyze geologic data and construct maps and cross sections that effectively illustrate the geologic condition represented by the data.
The student will formulate credible reserve estimates for both petroleum and mineral prospects. Additional components of this course include an introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) software and wire line logging techniques and interpretation. Prerequisite: GEOL 2000.

GEOL 3300 Applied Geophysics (4 sem. hours). Application of near surface geophysical methods to environmental and engineering problems (ground water, archaeology, earthquake hazards, etc.). Geophysical methods discussed and demonstrated include seismic, electrical, gravity/magnetic, ground penetrating radar, and borehole geophysics. Fieldwork required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOL 3500–3503 Field Study in Geology (1–4 sem. hours). Open to geology majors and some non-geology majors who are interested in field-based study of geologic concepts and processes. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Offered occasionally.

GEOL 3510 Field Geology I: The Greater Yellowstone Geoecosystem (4 sem. hours). This course is designed to provide students with a field-based introduction to the Yellowstone region (Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho). Students learn the tectonic and volcanic history of the Yellowstone Plateau, and observe the modern expression of this volcanic field in Yellowstone’s famed geysers and hot springs. In addition, evidence of recent earthquakes is investigated and mapped. Through various field exercises, students also examine stream processes and chemistry. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Offered in alternate summers.

GEOL 3520 Field Geology I: Earthquakes and Volcanoes of the Pacific Northwest (4 sem. hours). Nowhere in the United States are the processes and products of plate tectonics more apparent than in the Cascadia region of the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Northern California, and Wash- ington). This course is designed to provide students with a field-based introduction to earthquakes and volcanic hazards of one of the most geologically interesting and beautiful areas of the United States. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Offered in alternate summers.

GEOL 3530 Field Geology I: Folded Rocks – Crossing the Appalachia (4 sem. hours). This course is designed to provide students with a field-based introduction to the geology and geological history of the Appalachian Mountains. In addition, the course will provide students with opportunities to observe and analyze earth materials and geologic processes in the field. The course will begin with an overview of the tectonic and surficial processes of the southern Appalachians. The middle section of the course will focus on the geology of the Blue Ridge province of the Appalachians. Students will examine deformation associated with mountain building using various tech- niques in structural geology, including geologic mapping and cross-section preparation. Through various field exercises, students will also investigate stream, mass wasting, and tectonic processes.

GEOL 3750–3753 Special Topics in Geology (1–4 sem. hours). Open to geology majors and some non-geology majors who are interested in studying a special area of geology that is not offered in a regular course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOL 3800-3803 Directed Research (1–4 sem. hours). Laboratory and/or field research in geology under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEOL 4000 Mineralogy and Petrology (4 sem. hours). This course will introduce the student to the concepts of mineralogy that are the basis for petrologic, geochemical, and economic investigations. Identification of minerals in hand sample will aid in understanding the physical and chemical environments that promoted mineral genesis. Discipline specific skills developed include systematic analysis of minerals and mineral assemblages and the association of mineral and chemical composition with the environment of formation. Approximately one-third of the course will focus on understanding the relationship between mineral assemblages and igneous and metamorphic rock identification, classification, and petrology. Prerequisite or corequisite: GEOL 2000.

GEOL 4200 Structural Geology (4 sem. hours). Origin and classification of the structural features of the rocks comprising the Earth’s crust. Lab emphasizes various techniques of structural analysis. Prerequisites: GEOL 2000.

GEOL 4500 Field Geology II (4 sem. hours). Advanced training in the methods of geologic fieldwork and an introduction to regional geology. Prerequisites: To be determined by the college or university offering the course but should include GEOL 2000, GEOL 2200, GEOL 2300, GEOL 4200, and previous field experience. Offered in alternate summers.

GEOL 3901, 3911, 4921, and 4931 Geology Seminar (1 sem. hour each for a total of 4 sem. hours). The geology seminar series is designed to prepare the student for laboratory and field- based experiment formulation and design, research protocol, data interpretation, and presentation of results in an academic or professional manner, both in written and oral forms. The seminar courses, while independently focusing on specific objectives each semester, will occasionally hold joint meetings to cover special topics or listen to guest speakers. 
GREE - Greek Classical Studies Courses

GREE 1000 Introduction to Greek I (4 sem. hours). Learn to think and read like an ancient Greek. This is the first part of the beginning Greek sequence that introduces students to all essential Greek grammar, vocabulary, and forms, while emphasizing critical reading skills. Offered regularly.

GREE 1010 Introduction to Greek II (4 sem. hours). Learn to think and read like an ancient Greek. This is the second part of the beginning Greek sequence that introduces students to all essential Greek grammar, vocabulary, and forms, while emphasizing critical reading skills. Offered regularly. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in GREE 1000, or equivalent experience and appropriate score on placement test.

GREE 2000 Attic Orators – 3rd Semester (4 sem. hours). A 3rd semester reading course in ancient Greek focusing on the speeches of Lysias or Demosthenes. We will explore Greek rhetoric, Athenian court practices as well as the social and political context for the speeches. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in GREE 1010, or equivalent experience and appropriate score on placement test.

GREE 2010 Plato – 3rd Semester (4 sem. hours). A 3rd semester reading course in ancient Greek. Selected readings from the dialogues of Plato illustrate the range of Socratic and Platonic thought. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in GREE 1010, or equivalent experience and appropriate score on placement test.

GREE 2020 Euripides – 3rd Semester (4 Sem. hours). A third semester course in ancient Greek. Selected readings from at least one of Euripides’ plays. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in GREE 1010, or equivalent experience and appropriate score on placement test.

GREE 2030 Herodotus – 3rd Semester (4 sem. hours). A third semester course in ancient Greek. Selected readings from Herodotus’ Histories. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in GREE 1010, or equivalent experience and appropriate score on placement test.

GREE 3000 Attic Orators – Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from several speeches of Lysias or Demosthenes. We will explore Greek rhetoric, Athenian court practices as well as the social and political context for the speeches. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 2000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 3010 Plato - Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from the dialogues of Plato illustrate the range of Socratic and Platonic thought. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 2000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 3020 Euripides – Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from at least one of Euripides’ plays. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 2000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 3030 Herodotus – Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from selected books of Herodotus’ Histories. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 2000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 3040 New Testament in Context - Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings in one or more books of the New Testament as well as pagan literature of the same period.
Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 2000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 3050 Homer – Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from selected books of the Iliad or Odyssey in Homeric Greek. We will also address key issues and texts pertaining to the Homeric Question. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 2000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 3060 Sophocles –Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from at least one of Sophocles’ plays. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 2000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 3070 Aristophanes – Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from at least one of Aristophanes’ comedies with selected plays in translation. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 2000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 3080 Thucydides – Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from selected books of Thucydides’ Histories. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 2000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4000 Attic Orators – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course in the speeches of Lysias or Demosthenes. We will explore Greek rhetoric and Athenian court practices, as well as the social and political context for the speeches. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4010 Plato – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course from the dialogues of Plato including instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4020 Euripides – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course of at least one of Euripides’ plays. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4030 Herodotus – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course on the Histories of Herodotus. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4040 New Testament in Context – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course on one or more books of the New Testament as well as pagan literature of the same period. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4050 Homer – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course from selected books of the Iliad or Odyssey in Homeric Greek. We will also address key issues and texts pertaining to the Homeric Question. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4060 Sophocles – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course of at least one of Sophocles’ plays. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4070 Aristophanes – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course on Aristophanes’ comedies with selected plays in translation. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4080 Thucydides – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course on the Histories of Thucydides. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 3800-3803 Independent Study in Greek (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). Prerequisite: one GREE 2000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4800-4803 Independent Study – Advanced (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 3750–3753 Special Topics (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). Study of such authors as Hesiod, Xe- nophon, and Hellenistic poets, as well as Greek composition, prose or verse. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one GREE 2000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4750–4753 Special Topics – Advanced (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). Study of such authors
as Hesiod, Xenophon, or the Hellenistic poets as well as Greek composition, prose or verse. An advanced translation course in Greek includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

GREE 4900 Senior Seminar in Greek (4 sem. hours). This advanced Greek course fulfills the college’s Senior Seminar requirement. It will meet in tandem with one of the 4000-level Greek translation classes listed above (4010-4090), but in addition to the readings in Greek and research component (instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper). Offered each semester. Prerequisite: one GREE 3000-level, or equivalent.

HIST- History Courses

HIST 2100 History of the United States to 1877 (4 sem. hours). A survey of the cultures and history of the peoples that lived in the area that became the United States, from the pre-Columbian era through European colonization, the introduction of African slaves, the American Revolution, the early Republic, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

HIST 2110 History of the United States Since 1877 (4 sem. hours). A survey of the main developments in the United States and how they affected American men and women from the end of Reconstruction through industrialization and urbanization, the emergence of the United States as a world power, the rise of a partial welfare state, the Cold War, and the present.

HIST 2120 History of Mississippi (4 sem. hours). The course examines Mississippi’s history through its geography, demography, economy, politics, and culture. The interactions of these categories and their collective impact on contemporary issues in the state will be explored at length. Special emphasis will be placed on the positions of power that the migration to the state brought to bear among competing indigenous nations, between those nations and white migrants, and the interactions of white and black Mississippians through the institutions of slavery, the process of emancipations, and the struggle for equality.

HIST 2310 Ancient European History (4 sem. hours). A survey of the Mediterranean world from the Bronze Age to 200 C. E., with a topical emphasis on classical Greece, the late Roman Republic, and the Early Roman Empire, and with a methodological stress on reading, analyzing, and interpreting ancient sources in translation. (This course is the same as CLST 3600). Offered in alternate years.

HIST 2350 European History Since 1789 (4 sem. hours). This course is a survey of the major social, political, economic, and intellectual developments in European history from the French Revolution of 1789 to the revolutions in Eastern Europe in 1989/1990. Lectures and discussions will be devoted to understanding the influence of ideology (liberalism, conservatism, socialism, nationalism) on social and political life; the role of material factors (economic change, urbaniza- tion, the experience of warfare) in historical change; and the global expansion of Europe and the extension of European ideas and institutions to other peoples of the world.

HIST 2400 African History and Society (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary survey of major themes in African history from the earliest records of human activity on the continent to the struggles for South Africa. Literature, music, art, and popular culture will be studied as ways of understanding the complex contemporary issues faced by Africans. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 2410 Topics in African History (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of a particular topic, period, or region in African history. The topics, which include the shaping of South Africa and listening to the African past, will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

HIST 2500 Middle Eastern History and Society (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary survey of major themes in Middle Eastern history from the advent of Islam to the war in Iraq. Literature, music, art, and popular culture will be studied as ways of understanding the contemporary issues faced by men and women of this region. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 2600 Colonial Latin America (4 sem. hours). This course will begin by surveying pre-Colombian societies and then follow Latin American history from 1492 to the independence era of 1791–1825. It will consider the central questions of how Spain and Portugal subjugated territories so vast without a large standing army, and the colonial roots of the differences between British North America and Spanish and Portuguese America.

HIST 2610 Modern Latin America (4 sem. hours). This course will survey Latin American history from the independence era to the present. There will be a particular focus on Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina. Themes considered include nation building, revolutions, populism, race and class, the mass media, democratization, and relations with Europe and the United States.

HIST 2750 Special Topics in History (4 sem. hours). This course addresses areas not covered in other courses. It may be repeated for credit with different topics. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3100 Topics in American Culture (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary exploration of a particular topic in American culture. Topics will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3110 Colonial America (4 sem. hours). This course examines major economic and political events, such as the European settlement of Jamestown, Virginia, and the Salem Witch Trials. But this is not a survey of colonial American history; instead it is primarily a social and cultural exploration of four regions (the Chesapeake, New England, the Carolina, and Louisiana/ Mississippi) where Europeans, Indians, and Africans together built what would become the United States of America. Thus, the class will learn about colonial Native American family structure and the working lives of black slaves, in addition to studying more popular figures like Cotton Mather and John Smith.

HIST 3140 Civil War and Reconstruction (4 sem. hours). An examination of the political, economic, military, diplomatic, and social aspects of the Civil War and Reconstruction periods.

HIST 3160 The History of Medicine and Health in the U. S. (4 sem. hours). This course examines the history of medicine and health from the colonial era to the present. It takes a cultural and social perspective. Emphasis will be paid to the ways in which politics, cultural beliefs, and religious values have been an integral part of the history of medicine and public health. Readings, lectures, and discussion will focus on the practice of medicine; they will examine healers, patients, therapies, and medical innovations. The course will cover such topics as the emergence of the medical profession, the rise of the hospital, the roles of the laboratory and medical technology in modern medicine, and the range of choices faced by physicians and patients in their efforts to promote health. Students will produce a scholarly paper based on original research in medical history at the Mississippi State Archives.

HIST 3170 African-American Heritage (4 sem. hours). This course will explore the history and culture of African-Americans from the Colonial era to the Civil Rights decades of the mid 20th century. Careful attention will be paid to the Atlantic slave trade, slavery, emancipation, Reconstruction, the “Great Migration” of 1915–40, and the civil rights movements of the 1950s and ’60s. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3180 Immigrations and Migrations in American History (4 sem. hours). This course explores the history of immigration and migration patterns over the course of American history. Beginning with the migrations of indigenous peoples through the North American continent, the course tracks the impact of European, Asian, and African immigrations from the colonization period to the present. Urban/suburban migrations and other movement patterns will also be examined closely as a way to better understand the nature of the geographic movement and its interactions with political, economic, social, and cultural events.

HIST 3210 The Great Depression (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of American history and culture during the Great Depression (1929–41), utilizing literature, film, music, painting, and photography, as well as more traditional historical sources. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3220 The Forties and Fifties (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of American history and culture from World War II through the 1950s, utilizing literature, film, music, and painting, as well as more traditional historical sources. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3230 The Sixties (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of American history and culture during the 1960s, utilizing literature, film, music, painting, and sculpture, as well as more traditional historical sources. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3240 The Seventies and Eighties (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of American history and culture from the Nixon years through the 1980s, utilizing literature, film, music, and painting, as well as more traditional sources. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3260 Women (and Men) in America (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of the history of women and the ways in which they have interacted with men and male-dominated institutions over the course of American history. The course will employ works of literature, art, film, and music among its means of exploring the changing lives of women and men in America. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3300 Topics in European Culture and History (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of a particular topic, period, or region of European culture. Topics will change. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3310 Britain and the World, Prehistory to 1688 (4 sem. hours). This course surveys the history of Britain and its relations with Europe from the Iron Age to the Glorious Revolution, with an emphasis on political, social, and environmental change. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3320 Britain and the World, 1688 to the Present (4 sem. hours). This course surveys the history of modern Britain, with an emphasis on industrialization, imperialism, and decolonization. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3340 History of the French and Haitian Revolutions through the Age of Napoleon (4 sem. hours). This course aims to give a thorough introduction to the French Revolution and its effects on the course of world history. The scope of the course will cover politics, social conflict, cultural developments, warfare, economics, nationalism, and gender relations. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3350 History of Modern France and Colonies (4 sem. hours). This course examines the history of modern France—the political, social, cultural, economic, scientific, artistic, ideological, and institutional history of France as a nation and the French as a people from the age of absolutism (roughly 1650) to the socialist era of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular attention will be paid to construction of the French nation, cultural and social self-definition, colonial interaction, and sociopolitical relationships between France and other nations. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3360 European Women (4 sem. hours). This course examines the experience of women and the meaning of gender in Europe from the 18th century to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of industrialization on the European family, the Victorian construction of separate spheres, the role of the state in defining gender roles and regulating sexuality, the impact of war on gender relations, and the struggle for political rights. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3370 Art and Power in Europe: Ritual, Myth, and Propaganda, from the Emperor Augustus to the House of Windsor (4 sem. hours). This course analyzes the role of rituals, myths, and propaganda in politics. Throughout Western history, cultural means have been used to create, express, or legitimate political power. This course investigates how paintings, films, poems, and ceremonies have been manipulated to bolster the political authority of rulers, including Louis XIV, Hitler, and Elizabeth II. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3380 History of Sexuality in Europe (4 sem. hours). This course examines the history of sexuality in Europe, with comparisons to ancient and medieval periods. We will explore sexual practices among Victorians, the influence of non-western cultures on Europeans' understanding of sex, regulation of prostitution as protection and punishment, and development of sexology as an area of study. We will analyze the work of feminists as pro-/anti-sex. Finally, we will study homosexuality among all populations, but especially in urban areas during the twentieth century.

HIST 3410 First World War: a Global Approach (4 sem. hours). This course will survey the origins, course, and outcomes of the First World War, paying attention to developments in Europe as well as Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Americas.

HIST 3420 The Second World War: A Global Approach (4 sem. hours). This course will survey the origins, course, and outcomes of the Second World War, paying equal attention to the fighting in Europe and Asia, as well as the global impact of the conflict.

HIST 3500 Topics in Middle Eastern History (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of a particular topic, period, or region in Middle Eastern history. The topics, which include the Twice- Promised Land and Islam in History, will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3710 Environment, Technology, and Power (4 sem. hours). This course will address the mutual shaping of environmental, technological, and political changes by looking at case studies from around the world. Particular attention will be paid to agriculture, climate, and disease, as well as energy, forestry, and industry.

HIST 3750 Special Topics in History (4 sem. hours). This course addresses areas not covered in other courses. It may be repeated for credit with different topics. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3760 Special Topics in Comparative World History (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of a topic in comparative world history. Offered occasionally.

HIST 4750 Special Topics in History (4 sem. hours). This course addresses areas not covered in other courses. It may be repeated for credit with different topics. Offered occasionally.

HIST 4800-4802 Directed Study (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours).

HIST 4810-4813 Internship – Archives (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). HIST 4820 Teaching Internship (4 sem. hours).

HIST 4850-53 History Internship (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours).

HIST 4900 Senior Seminar (4 sem. hours). An examination of how history is written and inter- preted and of particular problems in history. May be taken by students who have two courses in history and is required for all history majors. 

LAST- Latin American Studies Courses

LAST 2000: Introduction to Latin American Studies ( 4 sem. hours). This introduction to the region will emphasize its diversity, while devoting segments to history; politics and politicians; wealth and poverty; the media; and Latin America’s relationship with the USA. It will encourage critical analysis of how Latin America is projected in the media and comparative analysis between countries.

LAST 3750 Special Topics in Latin American Studies (4 sem. hours). An intermediate level course addressing areas not covered in other courses. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Offered occasionally.

LAST 3800-3803 Directed Study in Latin American Studies (1, 2, 3 or 4 sem. hours). If students wish to pursue a subject or problem beyond the standard curricular offerings, they must plan such a course with an instructor and obtain that instructor’s permission to register for this option.

LAST 3850-52 Latin American Studies Internship (2 or 4 sem. hours). Off-campus experience in fields that serve the Latin American community, at home or abroad, such as print or broadcast journalism, teaching, public relations, advertising, theater, or new media. A minimum of 2 hours are required of all students majoring in Latin American Studies.

LAST 4750 Special Topics in Latin American Studies (4 sem. hours). An advanced course addressing areas not covered in other courses. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Offered occasionally.

LAST 4900: Senior Colloquium in Latin American Studies (4 sem. hours). 

LATN - Classical Studies Latin Courses

LATN 1000 Introduction to Latin I (4 sem. hours). Learn to think and read like a Roman. This is the first part of the beginning Latin sequence that introduces students to all essential Latin grammar, vocabulary, and forms, while emphasizing critical reading skills. Readings include selections from Latin prose and poetry that illustrate key concepts and events from Roman civilization. A grade of D or better is required to continue into LATN 1010: Intro to Latin II. Offered regularly. Prerequisite: None.

LATN 1010 Introduction to Latin II (4 sem. hours). Learn to think and read like a Roman. This is the second part of the beginning Latin sequence that introduces students to all essential Latin grammar, vocabulary, and forms, while emphasizing critical reading skills. Readings include selections from Latin prose and poetry that illustrate key concepts and events from Roman civilization. A grade of D or better is required to continue into any 3rd semester Latin course. Offered regularly. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in LATN 1000, or equivalent experience and appropriate score on placement test.

LATN 2000 Catullus – 3rd Semester (4 sem. hours). Selected readings of the Carmina illustrate this profane and personable late-Republican author’s remarkable range of genre, meter, theme, and emotion. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in LATN 1010, or equivalent experience and appropriate score on placement test.

LATN 2010 Ovid – 3rd Semester (4 sem. hours). Selected readings from the poetry of Ovid illustrate Ovid’s blazing wit, masterful artistry, and sardonic view of the relations between mortals and immortals. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in LATN 1010, or equivalent experience and appropriate score on placement test.

LATN 2020 Caesar – 3rd Semester (4 sem. hours). Selected readings from Caesar’s commentaries on the Gallic and Civil wars. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in LATN 1010, or equivalent experience and appropriate score on placement test.

LATN 2030 Cicero – 3rd Semester (4 sem. hours). Selected readings of the speeches, letters, and philosophical works illustrate why Cicero is considered the master of Latin prose. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in LATN 1010, or equivalent experience and appropriate score on placement test.

LATN 3000 Catullus – Intermediate (4 sem.hours). Intermediate level readings from the Carmina illustrate this profane and personable late-Republican author’s remarkable range of genre, meter, theme, and emotion. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 3010 Ovid - Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from a range of Ovid’s poems illustrate his blazing wit, masterful artistry, and sardonic view of the relations between mortals and immortals. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 3020 Caesar – Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from Caesar’s commentaries on the Gallic and Civil wars. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 3030 Cicero - Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from the speeches, letters, and philosophical works illustrate why Cicero is considered the master of Latin prose. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 3040 Vergil - Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from Vergil’s works: Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 3050 Livy – Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from one of Rome’s most prolific historians. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 3060 Sallust – Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from Sallusts’ historical monographs. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 3070 Roman Comedy - Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from the comedies of Plautus or Terence. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 3080 Roman Novel - Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from the two extant Roman novelists, Petronius and Apuleius. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 3090 Late Antique and Medieval Latin - Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Intermediate level readings from a selection of poets and prose authors, pagans and Christians, men and women from every corner of the post-Classical Roman world (ca. 400 to 1300 CE). Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4000 Catullus – Advanced (4 sem .hours). Advanced readings from the Carmina illustrate this profane and personable late-Republican author’s remarkable range of genre, meter, theme, and emotion. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4010 Ovid – Advanced (4 sem. hours). Advanced readings from a range of Ovid’s poems illustrate his blazing wit, masterful artistry, and sardonic view of the relations between mortals and immortals. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4020 Caesar – Intermediate (4 sem. hours). Advanced readings from a selection of Caesar’s commentaries on the Gallic and Civil wars. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4030 Cicero – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course from a range of Cicero’s speeches, letters, and philosophical works to illustrate why Cicero is considered the master of Latin prose. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4040 Vergil – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course in a range of Vergil’s poetry from the Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4050 Livy – Advanced (4 sem. hours). Advanced readings from one of Rome’s most prolific historians. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4060 Sallust – Advanced (4 sem. hours). Advanced readings from Sallusts’ historical monographs. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4070 Roman Comedy – Advanced (4 sem. hours). Advanced readings from the comedies of Plautus or Terence. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4080 Roman Novel – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course on the two extant Roman novelists, Petronius and Apuleius. This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4090 Late Antique and Medieval Latin – Advanced (4 sem. hours). An advanced translation course based on selections by poets and prose authors, pagans and Christians, men and women from every corner of the post-Classical Roman world (ca. 400 to 1300 CE). This course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 2750-2753 Special Topics – 3rd Semester (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). Readings from selected Roman authors. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in LATN 1010, or equivalent experience and appropriate score on placement test.

LATN 3750-3753 Special Topics (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). Study of selected authors such as Horace, Seneca, Lucan, Statius, Pliny, the Latin elegists, or a Latin prose composition. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4750-4753 Special Topics – Advanced (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). Advanced study of selected authors such as Horace, Seneca, Lucan, Statius, Pliny, the Latin elegists, or a Latin prose composition. This translation course includes instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 3800-3853 Independent Study in Latin (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours). Prerequisite: one 2000-level LATN course, or the equivalent.

LATN 4900 Senior Seminar in Latin (4 sem. hours). This advanced Latin course fulfills the college’s Senior Seminar requirement. It will meet in tandem with one of the 4000-level Latin translation classes listed above (4000-4090), but in addition to the readings in Latin and research component (instruction in disciplinary research tools and a seminar paper). Offered each semester. Prerequisite: one 3000-level LATN course, or the equivalent. 

MATH- Mathematics Courses

MATH 1000 Topics in Mathematics (4 sem. hours). A course with varying topics in mathematics chosen by the instructor. The content may focus on a specific subject or survey several topics in mathematics. Possible topics include mathematics and society, logic and problem solving, and models in business and the social sciences. This course does not serve as a prerequisite for any other mathematics course. Prerequisite: A minimum ACT mathematics sub-score of 16, or an SAT score of 390, or permission of department. Offered yearly.

MATH 1130 Elementary Functions (4 sem. hours). A review of algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities, and a study of linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Credit is not allowed for students who have received college credit for precalculus or any calculus course. Prerequisite: A minimum ACT mathematics sub-score of 20, or an SAT score or 470, or permission of department. Offered fall and spring. Credit is not allowed for both MATH 1130 and College Algebra.

MATH 1150 Elementary Statistics (4 sem. hours). Introduction to descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Topics include the Central Limit Theorem, confidence intervals, chi square test of independence and goodness of fit, analysis of variance, correlation, and regression analysis.
Applications to business, education, and other disciplines are emphasized. Prerequisite: A minimum ACT mathematics sub-score of 16, or an SAT score of 390, or permission of department. Offered every semester.

MATH 1210 Survey of Calculus (4 sem. hours). Topics include limits, the derivative, applications of the derivative with focus on applications in business and the social sciences, anti-derivatives, and applications of the definite integral. Credit is not allowed for both MATH 1210 and MATH 1220. Prerequisite: MATH 1130 with grade of C- or better, or a minimum ACT mathematics sub-score of 24, or an SAT of 550. Offered every semester.

MATH 1220 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I (4 sem. hours). Topics include limits, continuity of functions, the derivative, anti-derivatives, integrals, the fundamental theorem, and applications. Credit is not allowed for both MATH 1210 and MATH 1220. Prerequisite: MATH 1130 with grade of C- or better, or a minimum ACT mathematics sub-score of 24, or an SAT of 550. Offered every semester.

MATH 1750–1753 Selected Topics in Introductory Mathematics (1–4 sem. hours). A narrowly defined, introductory study of an area of mathematics that is not covered through regular departmental offerings. While the course content will be decided by the instructor, topics could include mathematics in art and architecture, financial mathematics, and cryptology. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

MATH 2230 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II (4 sem. hours). Topics include integration techniques; applications of the integral; the properties of exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions; indeterminate forms; improper integrals; and an introduction to infinite series. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or departmental approval. Offered fall and spring.

MATH 2240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III (4 sem. hours). A continuation of MATH 2230. Infinite series, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals and their applications. Prerequisite: MATH 2230 or departmental approval. Offered in spring.

MATH 2310 Introduction to Advanced Mathematics (4 sem. hours). Topics include logic and proofs, set theory, relations, functions, and cardinality. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or departmental approval. Offered yearly.

MATH 2750-2753 Selected Topics in Intermediate Level Mathematics (1–4 sem. hours). A study of mathematical topics not covered in regular departmental offerings, or an extension of materials covered in regular departmental offerings. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 and consent of instructor.

MATH 3540 Differential Equations (4 sem. hours). An introduction to ordinary differential equations, emphasizing equations of first and second order; linear differential equations of higher order and applications to physics, chemistry, and medicine. Prerequisite: MATH 2230 or departmental approval. Offered in fall.

MATH 3560 Discrete Structures (4 sem. hours). Topics include predicate logic, algorithms, modular arithmetic, counting techniques, recurrence relations, principle of inclusion exclusion, graph theory, and trees. Prerequisite: MATH 2230 and 2310 or departmental approval. This course is the same as CSCI 3500. Offered in alternate years.

MATH 3580 Complex Variables (4 sem. hours). Topics include complex numbers, sets, and functions; limits and continuity; analytic functions; Cauchy theorems and integrals; Taylor and Laurent series; residues; and contour integration. Prerequisite: MATH 2240 or departmental approval. Offered occasionally.

3620 Number Theory (4 sem. hours). Prime numbers and their distribution, divisibility MATH properties of the integers, Diophantine equations and their applications, theory of congruencies, Fermat’s Theorem, quadratic reciprocity, and the historical background in which the subject evolved. Prerequisite: MATH 2310 or departmental approval. Offered occasionally.

MATH 3650 Linear Algebra (4 sem. hours). Systems of linear equations with emphasis on the Gauss-Jordan technique, invertible matrices, determinants, geometric vectors with applications to analytic geometry, physics, real finite dimensional vector spaces with applications through linear transformations, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, orthogonal diagonalization, and symmetric matrices. Prerequisite: MATH 2230 or departmental approval. Offered in spring.

MATH 3700–3703 Undergraduate Research (1–4 sem. hours). Research in special areas under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

MATH 3750–3753 Selected Topics in Advanced Mathematics (1–4 sem. hours). A study of an area of mathematics that is not covered in regular departmental offerings, or an extension of materials covered in regular departmental offerings. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

MATH 3850-3853 Internship (1-4 sem. hours). Practical experience and training with selected research, or teaching mathematics. Credit/no credit grading only.

MATH 4510 Mathematical Statistics (4 sem. hours). Topics include sample spaces, discrete and continuous probability distributions, independence and conditional probability, properties of distributions of discrete and random variables, moment-generating functions, sampling distributions, and parameter estimation. Prerequisite: MATH 2240 and MATH 2310 or departmental approval. Offered in spring.

MATH 4620 Abstract Algebra (4 sem. hours). A rigorous treatment of groups, rings, ideals, isomorphisms, homomorphisms, integral domains, and fields. Prerequisite: MATH 2310 or departmental approval. Offered in fall.

MATH 4630 Advanced Calculus (4 sem. hours). A rigorous treatment of limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, and convergence in n-dimensional Euclidean spaces. Prerequisite: MATH 2310 and MATH 2240 or departmental approval. Offered in spring.

MATH 4660 Topology (4 sem. hours). Consideration of topological spaces, including metric spaces, product spaces, and quotient spaces; separation axioms; connectedness; compactness; and continuous functions. Prerequisite: MATH 2310 or departmental approval. Offered occasionally.

MATH 4750–4753 Selected Topics in Advanced Mathematics (1–4 sem. hours). A study of an area of mathematics not covered in regular departmental offerings that require a high level of mathematical sophistication. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

MATH 4800 Graph Theory (4 sem. hours). A theoretical study of trees, connectivity, Eulerian graphs, Hamiltonian graphs, planarity, colorability, and extremal graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 2310 or departmental approval. Offered occasionally

MATH 4902–4912 Senior Seminar (2 sem. hours each). Reading and research in advanced mathematics; group and individual presentations both oral and written; preparation for comprehensive examination; opportunities to expand understanding of topics of interest to the individual student. Prerequisite: Senior standing or departmental approval. Offered yearly. 

MGIS- Management Information Systems

MGIS 3000 Management Information Systems (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on breadth of coverage rather than depth in any particular area. The topics covered include the strategic role of IT, discussion of MIS-specific computer hardware and applications, managing IT-related organizational change, systems development and outsourcing, and the Internet and electronic commerce. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. Offered during the spring semester.

MGIS 3020 E-Commerce (4 sem. hours). This course explores the e-commerce concept in the computer lab with focus on its business processes, opportunities, limitations, issues, and risks. Modules on creating web pages, working with XML, and web programming with Java will be included. Prerequisites: CSCI 1010 or equivalent and at least junior standing.

MGIS 3110 Business Networks and the Internet (4 sem. hours). Provides those responsible for technology management, strategic planning, and various aspects of organizational management with an understanding of networking, electronic communications, and the Internet. Topics will be covered from the management perspective and will include LAN, WAN, hubs, servers, various systems configurations, and Internet technologies with emphasis on implications for management. Prerequisites: Junior standing.


Special Purpose Course Numbers
MGIS 4750–4753 Special Topics (1–4 sem. hours).

 MGIS 4800–4803 Directed Studies (1–4 sem. hours).

 MGIS 4850–4853 Internship (1–4 sem. hours). 

MGMT- Leadership Management

MGMT 2000 Introduction to Management (4 sem. hours). Provides an introduction to the arts and sciences of management. Theories of organization structure, communication, and managerial decision making are addressed. Particular emphasis is given to organizational behavior. Additionally, a detailed analysis is made of the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling functions. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Offered during the fall semester.

MGMT 2020 International Business—Latin America (4 sem. hours). This is an intense course that requires students to travel and live in Latin America for at least a two-week period. Students are required to assess and understand geographic, environmental, economic, social-cultural, political, and legal factors that impact the business environment of Latin America. The course includes six hours of formal classroom instruction at Millsaps College before departure for the region, and an additional 38 hours of classroom instruction once in the region. In addition to the classroom instruction, the course provides experiential learning opportunities by requiring students to participate in field trips that expose them to the history and culture of the region, as well as to various leaders of business, industry, and government.

MGMT 3020 Managerial Ethics (4 sem. hours). This course is intended to help students recognize the ethical dilemmas that employees and managers typically face in day-to-day dealings with colleagues, subordinates, bosses, customers, the public, and other stakeholders, and to provide ethical frameworks for evaluating alternative courses of action. The emphasis of the course will be on managerial decisions, including those that students are likely to encounter in the early stages of their careers. Offered occasionally.

MGMT 3030 International Management (4 sem. hours). Introduction to behavioral and human resources issues facing managers of multinational corporations. Students will evaluate the effectiveness of various management practices and techniques when applied across the globe. Topics include culture, leadership, decision making, communication, motivation, and employee development, selection, and repatriation. Prerequisite: MGMT 3000.

MGMT 3030EI International Management Abroad (4 sem. hours). Introduction to behavioral and human resources issues facing managers of multinational corporations. Students will evaluate the effectiveness of various management practices and techniques when applied across the globe. Topics include culture, leadership, decision making, communication, motivation, and employee development, selection, and repatriation. Prerequisite: MGMT 3000.

MGMT 3040 Organizational Behavior (4 sem. hours). This course explores human behavior in organizational settings using theories from multiple disciplines including psychology, social psychology, and management. Examines how theories can be applied to create a positive work environment and improve worker morale and productivity. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Offered occasionally.

MGMT 4010 International Business (4 sem. hours). Focuses on issues and problems facing managers whose firms do business abroad. The strategic issues, operational practices, and external relations of multinational companies are analyzed through cases that bridge individual functional areas. Prerequisite: Junior-level B.B.A. compass courses.

MGMT 4010EI International Business Abroad (4 sem. hours). Focuses on issues and problems facing managers whose firms do business abroad. The strategic issues, operational practices, and external relations of multinational companies are analyzed through cases that bridge individual functional areas. Prerequisite: Junior-level B.B.A. compass courses.

MGMT 4020 Human Resource Management (4 sem. hours). This course addresses contemporary human resource challenges arising out of the social, economic, and governmental environments in which organizations operate. Topics include the changing role of the human resource department in organizations, building and developing a competent workforce, issues in international human resource management, cultural diversity in the workplace, and the changing nature of labor relations. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

MGMT 4030 Group Behavior (4 sem. hours). This course explores the current theories and empirical findings about the formation, structure, development, and influence of groups. The course is designed to explain why groups form and how group processes affect individual behavior and group performance. The course is intended to 1) extend the student’s knowledge of group theory and 2)enhance the ability to work with and manage groups. Offered occasionally.

MGMT 4900 Business Strategy (4 sem. hours). This course takes a searching look at the major components of strategy from an upper-level management perspective. Using case studies and simulations, this course provides a learning laboratory that integrates the knowledge and skills learned in the compass courses of each function. Prerequisite: Junior-level B.B.A. compass courses. Offered during the spring semester.

Special Purpose Course Numbers
MGMT 4750–4753 Special Topics (1–4 sem. hours).

 MGMT 4800–4803 Directed Studies (1–4 sem. hours).

 MGMT 4850–4853 Internship (1–4 sem. hours).

MRKT- Marketing Courses

MRKT 3000 Principles of Marketing (4 sem. hours). Consideration of pricing, promoting, and distributing products and services to satisfy buyers’ needs in an ethical and socially responsible manner, with particular attention to the impact of demographic, economic, social, environmental, political, legal, regulatory, and technological forces on domestic and global organizational marketing systems. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Offered during the fall semester.

MRKT 4010 Consumer Behavior (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on the process involved when individuals or groups select, purchase, use, or dispose of products, services, ideas, or experiences to satisfy needs and desires. To consider the scope of consumer behavior, the course emphasizes the complex and interdependent relationships between marketing stimuli and the day-to-day lives of consumers. Prerequisite: MRKT 3000. Offered occasionally.

MRKT 4020 Marketing Research (4 sem. hours). The course imparts an understanding of and the skills to apply the methods and techniques required for gathering, recording, and analyzing information for making marketing decisions. Prerequisites: MRKT 3000.

Special Purpose Course Numbers
MRKT 4750–4753 Special Topics (1–4 sem. hours).

 MRKT 4800–4803 Directed Studies (1–4 sem. hours).

 MRKT 4850–4853 Internship (1–4 sem. hours). 

MUSC- Music Courses

MUSC 1000 Foundations of Music (4 sem. hours). Foundations of Music explores notation, scales, intervals, chords, rhythm, and introductory concepts about form in music. Since elementary understanding of the keyboard facilitates music learning, some practical keyboard drill is included. Prerequisite: While foundations of music is a prerequisite for all music theory courses, students with a solid theory background may test out of this class.

MUSC 2000 Concepts and Design in Music I (4 sem. hours). This course explores the basic underlying principles and concepts related to musical abstraction. Students discover and apply thought processes utilized by composers. Independent creative activities that have expressive intent from the core of student work. Aural concepts are emphasized.

MUSC 2010 Concepts and Design in Music II (4 sem. hours). This course emphasizes music conventions and constructs that shape and define music style. Modal, tonal, and serial approaches to composition are studied. Student compositions and performances provide focus for the study. Aural concepts are emphasized. Prerequisite: Music 2000.

MUSC 2100 History of Jazz (4 sem. hours). A survey course that charts the stylistic evolution of jazz, from its humble beginnings to its status as a respected art form. The course will investigate the early roots of jazz, the importance of the art of improvisation, and recent trends. The social and cultural contexts surrounding the evolution of jazz styles will also be studied.

MUSC 2112 Music in the Marketplace (2 sem. hours). The study will lead to a critical analysis of how performance and reception of music has evolved historically in response to patronage and market forces. The course will emphasize ways musicians today can respond to a market economy. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 2120 The Age of Enlightenment: Mozart and Beethoven (4 sem. hours). This course explores the effects of Enlightenment and its influence on the composers of the late 18th and 19th century, and will include readings from the 18th-century philosophers and explore a variety of genres, which reflect this thought. Specific studies will involve the analysis of individual works, including one selected opera, an instrumental string quartet, and a symphony, with special focus on the works of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 2130 Women and Music (4 sem. hours). Explores contributions of women to the art of music with special emphasis on women composers and performers beginning with Hildegaard von Bingen in the Middle Ages and concluding with contemporary composers and performers.

MUSC 2140 World Music: Globalization in Sound (4 sem. hours). An investigation of selected music cultures from around the world, with the goal of understanding 'globalization' as it applies to music, specifically the musical processes through which traditional musics are co-opted and transformed for worldwide commercial consumption.

MUSC 2150 Wagner’s “Tristan and Isolde”: Sensual Love and Philosophy in Music An in-depth study of Richard Wagner’s music drama “Tristan and Isolde” with emphasis on sensual elements in music and how Wagner expressed his understanding of the philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer in the opera. No previous study of music is required.

MUSC 3000 Critical Skills and Music Analysis (4 sem. hours). This course investigates the presentation, development, and relatedness of musical ideas through harmonic and structural analysis of music forms. Student-written analyses and class presentations are an integral part of the study. Prerequisite: MUSC 2010

MUSC 3012 Counterpoint (2 sem. hours). This course probes 18th-century polyphony. Strict species counterpoint and period contrapuntal forms such as invention and fugue are studied. Drill and practice culminate in student contrapuntal compositions. Prerequisite: Music 3000. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 3110 Music History I (4 sem. hours). A history of Western music in the literature tradition, from the music of Medieval Christianity through Beethoven and early Romanticism. Incorporating stylistic analysis and listening, the course will connect individual works to society, politics, and the other arts, considering questions of meaning and the construction of music history itself.

MUSC 3120 Music History II (4 sem. hours). A history of Western art music from late Romanticism to the present. Incorporating stylistic analysis and listening, the course will connect individual works to society, politics, and the other arts, considering questions of meaning and the construction of music history itself. There are no prerequisties.

MUSC 3112 Romanticism (2 sem. hours). This course is a study of the European 19th century in music, beginning with Schubert and ending with the late Romantic works of Wagner and R. Strauss. The course will not only examine scores and recordings but will require readings in contemporary criticism on Romanticism’s socio-cultural roots. Prerequisite: MUSC 1000 or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 3122 Symphonic Literature (2 sem. hours). This course is a study of the most significant symphonic works from the 18th century to the present. Prerequisite: MUSC 1000 or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 3142 History of Opera (2 sem. hours). This course is a survey of the history of opera, from its beginnings in the 17th century to selected recent operas with an emphasis on placing the art form in the context of social history. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 3532 Conducting I (2 sem. hours). This course provides theoretical and practical background for leading a choral ensemble. The class functions as a laboratory for developing conducting techniques. Prerequisite: MUSC 1000. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 3542 Conducting II (2 sem. hours). This course provides additional support for developing conducting/analytical skills while utilizing significant ensemble literature. The class functions as a laboratory. Prerequisite: MUSC 3532. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 3591 Junior Recital (1 sem. hour). Junior performance concentrators only.

MUSC 4102 Literature for the Piano (2 sem. hours). This course surveys standard piano repertoire with emphasis on Discovery of stylistic characteristics of major keyboard composers. Student research forms an integral part of the study.

MUSC 4110 Church Music Literature/Hymnology (4 sem. hours). This course explores significant large and small forms of sacred music during the first half of the course. The second half examines hymnody with emphasis on English and American development of the form. Offered as needed.

MUSC 4132 Literature for the Voice (2 sem. hours). This course surveys solo song form of the Renaissance through the 20th century. The course emphasizes recital/concert program building from a historical perspective. Class performance is expected. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 4200 Music Methods for Today’s Schools (4 sem. hours). This course explores strategies for teaching grades K–12. Elementary topics include Suzuki, Dalcroze, Kodaly, and Orff techniques, while secondary topics emphasize choral methods. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 4202 Piano Pedagogy I (2 sem. hours). This course emphasizes techniques and materials used in teaching piano to children and older students in both private and class instruction. Papers on topics relating to piano teaching are expected. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 4220 Vocal Pedagogy (4 sem. hours). This course explores the physical musculature and mechanics of singing, the use of technical exercises, and the psychology of vocal teaching. Vocal health is emphasized. Investigation of basic repertoire for the beginning teacher forms an integral part of the course. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 4230 Instrumental Literature and Pedagogy (4 sem. hours). This course surveys standard instrumental repertoire with an emphasis on its major composers. Additional techniques of applied and classroom teaching will be explored. Student research, papers, class performance, and teaching demonstrations are expected. Offered as needed.

MUSC 4500 Conducting from the Organ Console and Service Playing (4 sem. hours). This course emphasizes choral conducting techniques and literature for the church organist during the first half of the semester. The second half focuses on organ style for accompanying hymns and anthems. Offered as needed.

MUSC 4592 Senior Recital (2 sem. hours). Senior performance concentrators only.

MUSC 4800–03 Directed Study (1–4 sem. hours). Students may elect to design a course that allows them to pursue an area of special interest not included in other courses. Faculty approval is required.

MUSC 4852 Internship for Church Musicians (2 sem. hours). This course provides the prospective church musician practical experience under the guidance of a practicing, full-time church musician. Five to eight hours each week are spent in the church setting.

MUSC 4862 Piano Pedagogy II (2 sem. hours). This course continues work begun in Piano Pedagogy I. Actual teaching in an internship context is required. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 4900 Senior Seminar (4 sem. hours). This course is a study of recent trends in music scholarship.

MUSC 4902 Music Study as Aesthetic Contemplation (2 sem. hours). This course is a study that places in context the main aesthetic philosophies of music performance and education. Offered in alternate years.

MUSC 4910 Undergraduate Thesis (4 sem. hours).
MUSC- Applied Music Courses

MUSC 15S1 Singers (1 sem. hour). Students perform important choral works from all major style periods, often with orchestra. A cappella and accompanied presentations are balanced.

MUSC 15C1 Chamber Singers (1sem hr.). Gives students opportunities to perform significant works for small choral ensembles. Chamber Singers membership is contingent upon membership in Singers and students are expected to enroll both semesters to receive academic credit. Chamber Singers is the touring choir of the college.

MUSC 1501 Instrumental Ensembles (1 sem. hour). Gives students opportunities to perform significant works for small ensembles. Instrumental opportunities are offered according to student needs.

MUSC 1531 Piano Class I (1 sem. hour). A study of the rudiments of playing the piano designed for non-piano concentrators and other music students who have had no previous piano study. Competency in reading keyboard music, scales and arpeggios, harmonization of short melodies, accompanying, transposition, choral score reading, ensemble, and solo repertoire are stressed.

MUSC 1541 Piano Class II (1 sem. hour). A continuation of study begun in MUSC 1531. Prerequisite: MUSC 1531 or consent of instructor.

MUSC 2531 Piano Class III (1 sem. hour). A second year continuation of the studies initiated in MUSC 1531 and 1541. Prerequisite: MUSC 1541 or consent of instructor.

MUSC 2541 Piano Class IV (1 sem. hour). A continuation of study begun in MUSC 2531. Following the completion of these courses, the student should be prepared to take the piano proficiency required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUSC 2531 or consent of instructor.

MUSC Voice 1511, 1521, 2511, 2521, 3511, 3521, 4511, 4521, 1512, 1522, 2512, 2522,
3512, 3522, 4512, 4522 (1–2 sem. hours). Private studio lessons for nonmusic and music majors. Employs basic vocal repertoire appropriate for individual vocal growth. Historical style development as well as breath support, posture, phonation, enunciation, articulation, and related singing skills are emphasized. Weekly repertoire class is required.

MUSC Piano 1511, 1521, 2511, 2521, 3511, 3521, 4511, 4521, 1512, 1522, 2512, 2522, 3512,
3522, 4512, 4522 (1–2 sem. hours). Private studio lessons for nonmusic and music majors. Introduces appropriate literature from the major style periods and technical drill.

MUSC Organ 1511, 1521, 2511, 2521, 3511, 3521, 4511, 4521, 1512, 1522, 2512, 2522, 3512,
3522, 4512, 4522 (1–2 sem. hours). Private studio lessons for nonmusic and music majors. Provides keyboard and pedal technique needed to perform major organ literature. Sufficient piano background is necessary. Weekly repertoire class is required.

MUSC Instrumental Study 1511, 1521, 2511, 2521, 3511, 3521, 4511, 4521, 1512, 1522, 2512,
2522, 3512, 3522, 4512, and 4522 (1–2 sem. hours). Private studio lessons for nonmusic and music majors. Provides fundamental technique for performance on orchestral instruments. Literature appropriate for each student is utilized. 
NEUR- Neuroscience and Cognitive Studies Courses

NEUR 2000 Introduction to Neuroscience (4 sem. hours). This course will be a survey of selected topics in neuroscience that will span the breadth of the field, ranging from cell and molecular topics to behavioral and psychological aspects of the field. Topics include biomembrane structure and function, neural signaling, including action potential and neurotransmitter systems, and gross anatomy of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 (Introduction to Psychology).

NEUR 2020 History of Neuroscience (4 sem. hours). This course will explore how the brain and mind have been studied since ancient times. This course will also explore current methodologies used to study the brain and mind. Topics include prescientific thinking, scientific method, neuro- anatomy and physiology, and methodologies including, but not limited to event related potentials, MRI, PET scans, and single cell recordings. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 (Introduction to Psychology) and PSYC 2000 (Introduction to Neuroscience).

NEUR 3200 Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology (4 sem. hours). This course will cover the anatomical structure and physiological function of the mammalian nervous system from a regional and systems level approach. The beginning of the course will concentrate on the regional structure of the nervous system and the electrochemical basis of neural communication. Then, we will integrate this knowledge within sensory and motor systems to understand how specific anatomical pathways convey information between the brain and the periphery. Prerequisite: NEUR 2000

NEUR 3400 Applied Research Neuroscience (4 sem. hours). This course will have students participate in applied research in neuroscience with faculty from Millsaps or the University of Mississippi Medical School in a seminar about current neuroscience research, and in regular class sessions related to applied research.

NEUR 4900 Senior Seminar ( 4 sem. hours). This course will entail intensive reading in the history of neuroscience and cognitive studies, exploration into the dynamic fields that study the mind and brain, investigation of new and relevant methods used to study the mind and brain, and basic preparation into the comprehensive exam. 
PHIL- Philosophy Courses

PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the classic problems and methods of philosophy, including topics such as logic, critical thinking, the existence of God, the basis of knowledge, human nature, the mind/body problem, free will, ethics, the meaning of life, and some applied moral problems. Offered every year.

PHIL 1010 Critical Thinking (4 sem. hours). An introduction to basic reasoning and critical skills focusing on learning how to determine whether to accept, reject, or suspend judgment on a claim depending on how much evidence and valid argumentation supports it. The course includes learning how to detect arguments, how to detect non-argumentative psychological persuasion, how to detect faulty reasoning, how to judge statistical claims, how to judge polls and surveys, how to judge the quality of an experimental scientific study, how to analyze everyday forms of persuasion (in journalism, advertising, politics, and personal conversations), how to apply the specific standards of aesthetic, legal, and moral reasoning, and how to write clear, coherent, well-argued and well-supported essays and reports. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2000 Ways of Knowing (4 sem. hours). An introduction to theories of knowledge from a variety of philosophical traditions, including topics such as mysticism, empiricism, rationalism, skepticism, pragmatism, and feminism. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2010 Social and Political Philosophy (4 sem. hours). An introduction to theories and problems of social and political organization, with special emphasis on the concepts of government, justice, punishment, family, property, work, and peace. This course is the same as PLSC 2500. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2100 Contemporary Moral Issues (4 sem. hours). An introduction to moral philosophy, including topics such as metaethics (the definition of good and evil, the source of morality, morality’s relationship to religion and biology, the proper goals of human life), ethical theory (the importance of consequences versus duties, virtue versus right and wrong, the ethical theories of Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Mill, Kant, Nietzsche, feminists, evolutionists), and applied ethics (abortion, euthanasia, death penalty, privacy rights, biotechnology, gay rights, animal rights, racism, sexism, multiculturalism, military policy, and others). Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2110 Biomedical Ethics (4 sem. hours). An introduction to conceptual and ethical issues concerning medicine and biotechnology, including topics such as the definition of death and disease, the definition of personhood, abortion, euthanasia, genetic engineering, reproductive technology, patients’ rights, human and animal research, organ transplants, cloning, biotechnological enhancement, and health care rights. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2120 Environmental Ethics (4 sem. hours). An introduction to conceptual and ethical issues concerning the environment, including topics such as the definition of “nature” and “technology,” major types of environmentalism, green politics, wilderness preservation and restoration, deforestation, animal rights, transgenic crops, pesticides, population control, pollution, and sustainable practices. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2130 Business Ethics (4 sem. hours). An introduction to conceptual and ethical issues concerning business, including topics such as the responsibilities of businesses, obligations to employees, customers, community, environment, and shareholders, issues of fair wages, outsourcing, international employment, product safety, corporate culture, mission statements and ethics codes, whistle-blowing, marketing and truth in advertising, intellectual property rights, information technology and privacy, unions and workers’ rights, litigation and legal liability discrimination and affirmative action, accounting and fraud, ethical investing, corporate takeovers, and general ethical issues of capitalism, socialism, and commercialism. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2210 Aesthetics (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the nature of art and specific art forms, aesthetic experience and judgment, and relations between the aesthetic values and other kinds of values (moral, political, religious, etc.). Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2220 Philosophy and Literature (4 sem. hours). A study of various works of literature with an eye to issues such as the nature and function of language, perception and reality, self and the spoken word, theories of meaning, and texts and subtexts. Authors considered include Beckett, Borges, Pinter, Gass, O’Connor, DeLillo, Robbe-Grillet, Abish, Woolf, and others. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2230 Philosophy of Happiness (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the conceptual, ethical, and psychological issues of happiness, including topics such as the proper role of happiness in life, the issue of happiness as an ultimate goal, the definition of happiness, the best ways to achieve happiness, the question of whether happiness is possible, the relationship between happiness and morality, scientific studies of happiness, the rise of positive psychology, mood-altering drugs, conceptual issues of mental health, and criticisms of happiness including issues of the value of misery, suffering, and depression. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2240 Philosophy of Violence (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the conceptual, ethical, and psychological issues of violence, including topics such as violence that has traditionally been hard for people to pay attention to because of its horrific nature, the politics and physiology of torture, the machines and structures of war, the inflammatory writings of sexual deviant Sade, and the forgotten history of what is today called “trauma.” Two populations that emerge for our studies are male survivors with combat trauma and female survivors of rape and domestic abuse. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2250 Philosophy of Film (4 sem. hours). A study of issues in the formation of personal and social experience through the mediation of film, using historically important films and film theories along with philosophers as primary sources. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2400 The Meaning of Work (crosslisted with FWRK 2400) (4 sem. hours). An investigation into the phenomenon that is arguably at the foundation of human civilization and the human psyche: work. The course explores issues of value, purpose, function, organization, and justice in relation to the meaning of work from a variety of perspectives, including philosophy, theology, sociology, psychology, and management. Offered every year.

PHIL 2750–2753 Special Topics (1–4 sem. hours). A lower-level course on special issues not regularly covered by the curriculum. Special topics courses offered in recent years include: Existentialism, Pragmatism, Gender and Technology, Sexual Ethics, Philosophy of Time, Philosophy of History, Philosophy of Personal Identity, Philosophy of Mental Illness, The Concept of God, Philosophy of Language, Epistemology, Metaphysics, and Ethical Theory & Metaethics. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 2900 Logic (4 sem. hours). An introduction to propositional logic and quantification, and to a lesser extent syllogistic logic. Attention will be given to scientific method and induction and to informal analysis of arguments in language. Offered every year.

PHIL 3010 History of Philosophy I (4 sem. hours). A survey of Western philosophy from the ancient through the medieval period. Philosophy 3010 is the same as Classics 3340. Offered every year.

PHIL 3020 History of Philosophy II (4 sem. hours). A survey of Western philosophy from the Renaissance through the 20th century. Students are strongly advised to take PHIL 3010 before taking this course. Offered every year.

PHIL 3120 Philosophy of Mind (4 sem. hours). An examination of the nature of mind, including topics such as mental versus physical explanations of minds, perception, optical and cognitive illusions, the limits of human knowledge, personal identity, artificial intelligence, evolutionary explanations of moral and religious beliefs, and thought experiments about zombies, brains in vats, brain implants, and robot civil rights. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 3140 Philosophy of Religion (4 sem. hours). An examination of issues arising from religious experience and beliefs, including topics such as the arguments for and against the existence of God, the nature of the divine, the problem of evil, and human destiny. (Same as Religious Stud- ies 3310.) Offered in alternate years.

PHIL 3200 Applied Philosophy: Methods and Research (4 sem. hours). A survey of philosophical methods of analysis and applying those methods to a specific research question identified by the student and the instructor. Applied philosophy takes a particular problem or phenomenon, and employs a set of methods to analyze and make recommendations for solving the problem or explaining the phenomenon. Those methods include conceptual analysis, definitional clarification, problem identification, assumption identification, possibility gridding, logical analysis, field observation, and experimental research. Students interested in this course should contact the instructor to discuss their particular interest. While the Philosophy department has significant resources for projects in biomedical ethics and medicine, students may wish to propose projects in law, public policy, religion, or science.

PHIL 3300 Moral Psychology and Neuroscience (4 sem. hours). An examination of the evolutionary, cognitive, and neurological mechanisms of human moral psychology. Topics covered include ethical theories and the intuitive conflicts that arise in classic moral dilemmas, the problem of persistent inconsistent moral judgments, moral decision making, moral development theory, the nature and classification of moral emotions (shame, pride, disgust, etc), attributions of blame and responsibility, moral judgment and causation, trust and loyalty, moral luck, and cognitive moral pathologies such as psychopathy. The course will cover the history of moral psychology but will focus predominantly on recent empirical studies of moral cognition using neuroimaging and neuropharmacological manipulations.

PHIL 3500 Applied Philosophy: Methods and Research (4 sem. hours). A survey of philosophical methods of analysis and applying those methods to a specific research question identified by the student and the instructor. Applied philosophy takes a particular problem or phenomenon, and employs a set of methods to analyze and make recommendations for solving the problem or explaining the phenomenon. Those methods include conceptual analysis, definitional clarification, problem identification, assumption identification, possibility gridding, logical analysis, field observation, and experimental research. Students interested in this course should contact the instructor to discuss their particular interest. While the Philosophy department has significant resources for projects in biomedical ethics and medicine, students may wish to propose projects in law, public policy, religion, or science.

PHIL 3750–3753 Special Topics (1–4 sem. hours). An upper-level course on special issues not regularly covered by the curriculum. Special topics courses offered in recent years include: Existentialism, Pragmatism, Gender and Technology, Sexual Ethics, Philosophy of Time, Philosophy of History, Philosophy of Personal Identity, Philosophy of Mental Illness, The Concept of God, Philosophy of Language, Epistemology, Metaphysics, and Ethical Theory & Metaethics. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 3850-3853 Internship (1-4 sem. Hours). Applied analysis, practical experience, and training with selected research, educational, governmental, legal, medical, religious, artistic, or business institutions. Prerequisite: Arrangement with specific instructor to direct the internship. Offered every semester.

PHIL 4750–4753 Special Topics (1–4 sem. hours). A senior-level course on special issues not regularly covered by the curriculum. Special topics courses offered in recent years include: Existentialism, Pragmatism, Gender and Technology, Sexual Ethics, Philosophy of Time, Philosophy of History, Philosophy of Personal Identity, Philosophy of Mental Illness, The Concept of God, Philosophy of Language, Epistemology, Metaphysics, and Ethical Theory & Metaethics. Offered occasionally.

PHIL 4800–4803 Directed Study (1-4 sem. hours). Intensive individual study on a topic of the student’s and professor’s choosing. Prerequisite: Arrangement with specific instructor to direct the study. Offered every semester.

PHIL 4902 Senior Seminar I (2 sem. hours). Seminar I is offered in the fall semester. Intensive reading in selected issues, schools, and thinkers and the completion of the comprehensive exam essay. Since the comprehensive exam is administered through the Senior Seminar, this course is open only to those completing the philosophy major. Students are strongly encouraged to finish History of Philosophy I and II before taking Senior Seminar. Offered every year.

PHIL 4912 Senior Seminar II (2 sem hours). Seminar II is offered in the spring semester. 
 
PHYS- Physics Courses

PHYS 1201 College Physics Laboratory I (1 sem. hour). Experiments to accompany College Physics I dealing mainly with mechanics, waves, and heat. Corequisite: PHYS 1203.

PHYS 1203 College Physics I (3 sem. hours). Fundamentals of mechanics, waves, fluids, and selected topics in thermal physics. A noncalculus course intended primarily for majors in the biological and health sciences. Corequisite: PHYS 1201.

PHYS 1211 College Physics Laboratory II (1 sem. hour). Experiments to accompany College Physics II dealing mainly with current electricity, optics, and modern physics. Corequisite: PHYS 1213.

PHYS 1213 College Physics II (3 sem. hours). The continuation of College Physics I. Fundamentals of electrostatics, current electricity, magnetism, optics, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1203. Corequisite: PHYS 1211.

PHYS 2001 General Physics Laboratory I (1 sem. hour). Experiments to accompany General Physics I dealing mainly with mechanics and wave motion. Corequisite: PHYS 2003.

PHYS 2003 General Physics I (3 sem. hours). A broad introduction to general physics for students who have taken an introductory calculus course. Main areas covered are mechanics and waves. Specific topics include vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, rotation, equilibrium, wave motion, and sound. Corequisite: PHYS 2001. Pre-requisite Math 1220

PHYS 2011 General Physics Laboratory II (1 sem. hour). Experiments to accompany General Physics II dealing mainly with electromagnetism and optics. Corequisite: PHYS 2013.

PHYS 2013 General Physics II (3 sem. hours). The continuation of General Physics I. General topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Specific topics include electrostatics, current electricity, magneto statics, time varying fields, and geometrical and physical optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2003. Corequisite: PHYS 2011. Pre-requisite Math 2230

PHYS 3000 Modern Physics (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the special theory of relativity and its consequences. Black body radiation and the particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation. Fundamentals of quantum physics, introduction to the Schrödinger equation, and simple applica- tions. Prerequisite: PHYS 2013 and MATH 2230.

PHYS 3010 Applications of Modern Physics (4 sem. hours). Application of elementary quantum mechanical concepts to explain physical phenomena occurring in atoms, nuclei, and solids. Topics include lasers, molecular structure, bonding in solids, band theory, nuclear structure, radioactivity nuclear fusion, and elementary particles. Prerequisite: Physics 3000. Offered in alternate years.

PHYS 3050 Astrophysics (4 sem. Hours). This class studies the physical processes governing the behavior of the stars, the galaxies, the origin of the elements, evolution of the stars, and the universe, neutron stars and black holes. Prerequisite: PHYS 2013 and MATH 2230.

PHYS 3200 Advanced Physics Laboratory (4 sem. hours). Experiments of classical and contemporary importance selected from various fields of physics. Experiments often deal with topics that have not been treated in other courses. Some areas of experimentation include interferometry, microwaves, and nuclear physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 3000.

PHYS 3300 Electronics for Scientists (4 sem. hours). The emphasis of this course is on analog electronics, including DC and AC circuit analysis, diode circuits, semiconductor devices, amplified circuits, operational amplifiers, and oscillators. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: PHYS 2013 or consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years.

PHYS 3400 Computational Physics (4 sem. Hours). In this course we will learn a variety of numerical techniques and how to apply them to problems in physics. This will include the computational solution of various ordinary and partial differential equations. Some of the problems tackled will include realistic projectile motion accounting for air resistance and the rotation of the earth, the problem of gravitational orbits in a three or more body system, chaotic behavior of classical oscillators and the relaxation method to solve the Laplace equation. Familiarity with a computer programming language will help but is not required. The implemented language is taught as part of the course.

PHYS 3500 Classical Mechanics (4 sem. hours). Dynamics of a single particle, including Newton’s laws, momentum, energy, angular momentum, harmonic oscillator, gravitation, and central force motion. The Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulation will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: PHYS 2013. Corequisite: MATH 3540. Offered in alternate years.

PHYS 3510 Electromagnetism (4 sem. hours). Fields, conductors, dielectric media, and Laplace’s and Poisson’s equations. Direct and alternating currents, magnetic induction and forces, electromagnetic energy, and Maxwell’s equations with applications. Prerequisite: PHYS 2013. Corequisite: MATH 3540. Offered in alternate years.

PHYS 3700–3703 Undergraduate Research (1–4 sem. hours). The student may continue to study topics of interest through readings and research. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PHYS 3760–3763 Advanced Special Topics or Laboratories in Physics (1–4 sem. hours). Deals with areas not covered in other physics courses or laboratories. Aimed primarily at juniors and seniors at the intermediate or advanced level. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PHYS 3800–3803 Directed Study (1–4 sem. hours). The student may begin to study topics of interest through readings and research. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PHYS 3850–3853 Internship (1–4 sem. hours). Practical experience and training with selected research, educational, governmental, and business institutions. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PHYS 4100 Thermal Physics (4 sem. hours). An introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics with implications for thermodynamics and the kinetic theory of gases. Topics include density of states, entropy and probability, partition functions, and classical and quantum distribution functions. Prerequisite: PHYS 3000. Offered in alternate years.

PHYS 4200 Quantum Mechanics (4 sem. hours). Postulates of quantum mechanics, operators, eigenfunctions, and eigenvalues. Function spaces, Hermitian operators, and time development of state functions. Schrodinger’s equation in one dimension, harmonic oscillator, rectangular potential barrier, and the WKB approximation. Problems in three dimensions, angular momentum, hydrogen atom, and theory of radiation. Matrix mechanics and spin. Prerequisite: PHYS 3000, MATH 3540. Offered in alternate years.

PHYS 4902 Similarities in Physics (2 sem. hours). Analysis of the similarities that occur in many diverse fields of physics by oral and written presentations. Also includes presenting information processed from physical literature. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PHYS 4912 Senior Seminar (2 sem. hours). A continuation of the theme in Similarities in Physics. Emphasis is placed on a unified approach to problem solving. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
PLSC- Political Science Courses

PLSC 1000 Introduction to American Government (4 sem. hours). A systems analysis of the American political environment and decision-making agencies, including study of federalism, state and local government, political parties, Congress, the presidency, and the judiciary.

PLSC 2000 Comparative Government (4 sem. hours). General comparative theory applied to developed and developing nations.

PLSC 2200 State and Local Politics (4 sem. hours). This course is a survey of the processes of government and politics within and across the states. This is not a course on Mississippi politics, though special consideration will be given to historical examples and current events in our state. The primary focus of the course is a comparative examination of the institutions and politics of state government. Significant time is also devoted to studying the structures and practices of local
government. Students gain a special appreciation for the complex relationships between state, local, and national levels of governance. Prerequisite: PLSC 1000 or permission of the instructor.

PLSC 2220 Urban/Metro Politics (4 sem. hours). The nature of urban, suburban, and metropolitan governance is examined. Questions of urban policy, the future of cities, and quality of urban/ metropolitan management are explored. Policy questions such as community and economic development, housing, growth management and planning, etc., are analyzed. Offered in alternate years.

PLSC 2250 Civic Engagement and Political Activism: All Politics is Local (4 sem. hours). This course is designed to help students understand and appreciate the importance of active participation of citizens in a pluralistic, democratic society while examining the relationship between politics and the community. Topics will include trends of civic life in American society, the history of civic engagement in communities, community activism, political action, consensus building to achieve measurable results, and public service leadership.

PLSC 2300: Politics of the American South (4 sem. hours). This course examines the governmental, electoral, historical, economic, social, and cultural variables in the American South as well as the vast changes that have occurred in southern politics in the past century. Course readings, lectures, and discussions will focus on governing institutions, individual politicians, and party structures in what is perhaps the nation’s most politically unique region.

PLSC 2350 Politics of Identity (4 sem. hours). This course investigates the role of gender, race, ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation in American politics and public policy. Students will examine how Americans think about others and themselves as members of different groups and what consequences it has for how we treat one another. The historical and psychological origins of this power dynamic are also explored. Prerequisite: PLSC 1000 or permission of the instructor.

PLSC 2400 International Relations (4 sem. hours). Consideration of issues, strategies, and theories of international politics, including the concepts of national interest, national defense, imperialism, balance of power, economics, and international cooperation and law.

PLSC 2500 The U. S. Congress (4 sem. hours). This course examines the roles and functions of Congress in American governance. Recruitment is analyzed, as are formal and informal structures and processes, interbranch relations, and legislative reform. Prerequisite: PLSC 1000 or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years.

PLSC 2520 The U.S. Presidency (4 sem. hours). This course analyzes the institutional nature, roles, and functions of the American presidency. Questions of selection, the nature of leadership and executive power, formal and informal duties of office, evolution of the presidency, and performance evaluation are also explored. Prerequisite: PLSC 1000 or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years.

PLSC 2550 The U.S. Judiciary (4 sem. hours). The nature and functioning of the judicial branch of American government is examined. This course analyzes judicial recruitment and selection, decision making, court organization, and management in courts from the U.S. Supreme Court to the municipal magistrate. Prerequisite: PLSC 1000 or permission of the instructor. Offered occasionally.

PLSC 2600 Peace, Conflict Resolution, and International Security (4 sem. hours). This course will focus on issues of peace and international security. The course will seek to stimulate a wider awareness and appreciation of the search for peaceful resolution to strife in all its forms. Offered in alternate years.

PLSC 2750-2752 Special Topics in Political Science (1, 2, and 4 sem. hours). Areas of interest not covered in regular courses; unusual opportunities to study subjects of special interest.

PLSC 2800 Political Theory (4 sem. hours). An inquiry into the basic principles of social and political organization, with special emphasis on concepts of government, justice, liberty, equality, punishment, family, property, work, and peace. This course is the same as PHIL 2010. Offered in alternate years.

PLSC 2900 American Political Thought (4 sem. hours). This seminar-style course examines the individuals and concepts that have helped shape the philosophical and political evolution of the United States. Students will explore the philosophical ideas, doctrines, and theories that have permeated American political life beginning from the formation of the U.S. Constitution through the development of 20th century liberalism and conservatism.

PLSC 3000 Campaigns and Elections (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on the fundamentals of electoral strategy and campaign management and is commonly offered during the fall semester of gubernatorial and/or presidential election years. Combining the traditional academic study of American elections with an applied approach, students are required to engage directly with a political campaign, party organization, or interest group that is working to affect the outcome of the electoral process as a major component of their semester grades. Prerequisite: PLSC 1000 or permission of the instructor.

PLSC 3100 Political Parties and Interest Groups (4 sem. hours). Examination of history and current structure and functions of American political parties and interest groups in American politics. Offered occasionally.

PLSC 3200 Mass Media and Political Communication (4 sem. hours). This course examines the influence of the media on political issues, public opinion, campaigns and elections, and political discourse in the United States. Topics will likely include the use of traditional and new media on political campaigns, the impact of media coverage on the policymaking process, case studies of successful and unsuccessful efforts by politicians to harness media coverage for political gain, and media bias and selective exposure. Students will also consider the role of talk radio, television, internet, and social media as mediums for political communication and political advertising strategies.

PLSC 3250 Politics in American Film and Popular Culture (4 sem. hours). Popular culture is an influential disseminator of political messages and ideological themes in American society.
Films—and other forms of pop culture such as sports, music, and television—can provide significant insights into the salient and latent political attitudes, beliefs, and values throughout various eras of American political history. This course will examine a variety of films and other forms of popular culture with political themes, requiring students to analyze and assess the messages and contained within.

PLSC 3300 African Government and Politics (4 sem. hours). Examination of politics and government in Africa by means of country studies and comparisons. Sections of the course will be devoted to the examination of issues of development and underdevelopment. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: PLSC 2000 or permission of the instructor.

PLSC 3350 European Government and Politics (4 sem. hours). Examination of politics and government in Western Europe by means of country studies and comparisons. Sections of the course will be devoted to the general topic of European integration and related concepts such as regionalism, functionalism, and integration theory. Prerequisite: PLSC 2000 or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years.

PLSC 3400 U.S. Foreign Policy (4 sem. hours). Diplomatic, military, and economic aspects of foreign policy considered within the context of current issues. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: PLSC 2000 or permission of the instructor.

PLSC 3500 American Public Policy (4 sem. hours). Analysis of civil liberties, civil rights, and fiscal, regulatory, social, defense, and foreign policies. Prerequisite: PLSC 1000 or permission of the instructor.

PLSC 3550 Public Administration (4 sem. hours). Theory and application of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, coordinating, reporting, and budgeting in public agencies. Offered occasionally.

PLSC 3610 International Organizations/Model United Nations (4 sem. hours). Examination of recent trends in the globalization and regionalization of political, social, and economic issues. A substantial part of the course will focus on the United Nations system. Through research and role-play (including participation in model UN situations), the course will examine several different areas of the UN’s work.

PLSC 3612 Model United Nations (2 sem. hours). Through research and role-play (including participation in model UN situations), the course will examine several different areas of the UN’s work.

PLSC 3700 Constitutional Law (4 sem. hours). An analysis, including historical background and philosophical evolution, of Supreme Court interpretations of constitutional provisions relating to the structure of the federal government and relationships between the different branches and with the states. Prerequisite: PLSC 1000 and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

PLSC 3750 Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (4 sem. hours). This course examines the individual constitutional rights provided by the Bill of Rights and by the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Topics of study include guaranteed freedoms of speech, expression, association, and religion; the right to privacy, the right to bear arms, and the rights of the criminally accused; and the equal protection clause, which prohibits race-based, gender-based, and other forms of discrimination.

PLSC 3800–3802 Directed Readings in Political Science (1, 2, or 4 sem. hours). Directed readings in political science. (No more than one directed reading course may be included in the list of courses for the major.)

PLSC 4000 Research Methods in Political Science (4 sem. hours). This course examines the fundamental issues involved in conceiving and executing research projects in Political Science. Students are introduced to the concepts that underlie the evaluation of empirical evidence and will primarily focus on the design of research. Major themes covered in the course include: developing research questions and hypotheses, measurement, causality, uncertainty, the scientific method, and the methodological debates that animate political science research. Students will be introduced to the types of scholarship found in the various subfields of political science and will learn to analyze political writings and research.

PLSC 4850-4852 Political Science Internship (1, 2, or 4 sem. hours).

PLSC 4400 Developing Nations (4 sem. hours). Comparative theory applied to developing nations. Prerequisite: PLSC 2000. Offered in alternate years.

PLSC 4750-4752 Special Topics in Political Science (1, 2, or 4 sem. hours). Areas of interest not covered in regular courses; unusual opportunities to study subjects of special interest.

PLSC 4900 Senior Seminar (4 sem. hours). Survey of historical development of the discipline, examination of contemporary issues in major subfields of the discipline, and examination of some examples of current uses of political science knowledge. 
 
PSYC- Psychology Courses

PSYC 1000 Introduction to Psychology (4 sem. hours). This course emphasizes psychology as a scientific discipline and in particular as a behavioral science with subfields ranging from biological psychology to therapies to human development to intelligence and more. Psychology, like all disciplines, is both the study of certain phenomena and a particular way of thinking about the world. This class provides a broad overview of the discipline including vocabulary and theories, basic methods, and critical examination of the research that has been done, the research that should be done, and the uses of research results. Thinking critically and creatively about problems is a hallmark of good psychological study and experimentation. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing and critiquing the research on which current knowledge is based and on critically examining the presentation of psychological and other scientific findings in non-academic contexts.

PSYC 1100 Love and Sexuality (4 sem. hrs). An examination of the biological, psychological, and social components of human sexuality. The course will explore the issues of love, intimacy, normal and abnormal sexual function, marriage, and alternative sexual lifestyles. Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 1200 Fear and Terrorism: (4 sem. hrs). The violent events of the 20th century are presented not as insane aberrations in the record of human behavior but as the result of understandable psychological and social processes. Through the study of these events, we explore the analytical methods and theoretical orientations of three social science disciplines: anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Offered summers as part of the European course offerings.

PSYC 2100 Statistics of the Behavioral Science (4 sem. hrs). This course will introduce students to the most commonly used statistical test in the social sciences. Hypothesis testing, correlations, regression equations, and nonparametric test will be covered in this course. The course will emphasize data analysis and interpretation results. Basic understanding of math and algebra are essential.

PSYC 2110 Research Methods in Psychology (4 sem. hrs). This course will introduce students to the processes involved in conducting sound experimental research. Students will learn methods of research, subject selection, hypothesis testing, and data analysis. Errors that can affect research and proper control of variables will be covered as well. Student will conduct their own research project and present it to the class at the conclusion of the semester required laboratory. Successful completion of PSYC 2100 is a prerequisite for PSYC 2110. Offered alternate terms.

PSYC 2130 Abnormal Psychology (4 sem. hrs). Presents a psychological understanding and view of abnormal behavior. The presently prevailing system for the clinical classification of abnormal behavior is highlighted. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

PSYC 2150 Child Development (4 sem. hrs). Examines the general sequence of psychological development in the individual through adolescence and the dominant theories of developmental psychology. Special attention is devoted to the domains of physical, cognitive, linguistic, and social development. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

PSYC 2170 Social Psychology (4 sem. hrs). Integrates current social psychological theory regarding communication, group dynamics, aggression, and human relations, with its application in real-world settings. Laboratory component. This course is the same as SOAN 3710. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

PSYC 2180 Behavioral Neuroscience (4 sem. hrs). Neurophysiological and neuroanatomical correlates and substrates of behavior, emotion, and cognition. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000. Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 2200 Sports Psychology (4 sem. hrs). This course will examine the influence of psychology factors on performance in sports. Topics include: athlete personality, motivation, attention, anxiety and arousal issues, cognitive and behavioral intervention, and leadership in team sports.

PSYC 3020 Psychology and Diversity (4 sem. hrs). Survey of empirical evidence on human and society. A focus on biological, developmental, social, and cognitive perspectives will be offered. Issues specific to diversity, such as discrimination and stereotyping, will be included.

PSYC 3050 Decision Making (4 sem. hrs). This course emphasizes the psychological processes utilized in making decisions. Topics covered include judgment, estimation, prediction and diagnosis, choice under certainty, heuristics and biases, risky decision making, and problem solving, as well as methods that have been developed to improve these processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000. Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 3060 Psychology of Language (4 sem. hrs). Examines the perception, comprehension, and production of language. Topics covered include psychological and linguistic aspects of phonology, syntax, and semantics; the biological bases of language; reading; bilingualism; language acquisition; and disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000. Recommended: PSYC 3100. Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 3070 Adulthood and Aging (4 sem. hrs). This course describes the physical, sensory, cognitive, personality, and social changes that occur in normal aging. Examines the dominant theories of developmental psychology from young adulthood through old age. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000. Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 3090 Drugs and Behavior (4 sem. hrs). Study of the behavioral effects of the most common legal and illegal drugs. The various actions of each drug on the central nervous system are emphasized with a concentration on how these actions lead to behavioral changes. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000. Recommended: PSYC 3180. Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 3100 Cognitive Psychology (4 sem. hrs). Cognitive processes underlying memory, problem solving, and consciousness. Systematic exploration of processes, mechanisms, and putative structures involved in encoding, storage, retrieval, and use of information. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

PSYC 3110 Sensation and Perception (4 sem. hrs). Mechanisms underlying immediate experience produced by stimuli and the organization of these sensations into meaningful, interpretable experience. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000. Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 3120 Learning (4 sem. hrs). Adaptive behavior with an emphasis on processes, principles, and theories related to behavioral change. Areas of reflexive adjustment, respondent conditioning, and operant conditioning, as well as their interactions, are examined. Laboratory component. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000. Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 3140 Theories of Personality (4 sem. hrs). Consideration of the whole spectrum of personality theories, including Freudian, humanistic, existential, and behaviorist models. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000. Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 3160 Clinical Psychology: Theory and Method (4 sem. hrs). Addresses the history, theory, and methods of clinical psychology. Major psychotherapeutic theories are considered. Pre- requisites: PSYC 2100 and 3130. Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 3190 Psychological Tests and Measurements (4 sem. hrs). Examines the history, methods, problems, and social concerns associated with measuring and assessing human behavior and abilities. Common tests of ability and psychopathology are considered. The laboratory includes administration and scoring of the WAIS. Prerequisite: PSYC 2110. Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 3210 Cognitive Neuroscience (4 sem. hrs.). This course will survey cognitive neuroscience methods such as brain imaging, neural network modeling, and behavioral testing of neuropsychological patients, toward an understanding of the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying behavior. Topics include: neuroanatomy, sensation and perception, learning and memory, object recognition, attention and consciousness, and language. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 (Introduction to Psychology) and PSYC 2210 (Introduction to Neuroscience).

PSYC 3300 Moral Psychology and Neuroscience (4 sem. hrs). An examination of the evolutionary, cognitive, and neurological mechanisms of human moral psychology. Topics covered include ethical theories and the intuitive conflicts that arise in classic moral dilemmas, the problem of persistent inconsistent moral judgments, moral decision making, moral development theory, the nature and classification of moral emotions (shame, pride, disgust, etc), attributions of blame and

responsibility, moral judgment and causation, trust and loyalty, moral luck, and cognitive moral pathologies such as psychopathy. The course will cover the history of moral psychology but will focus predominantly on recent empirical studies of moral cognition using neuroimaging and neuropharmacological manipulations.

PSYC 4700–4703 Undergraduate Research (1–4 sem. hrs). Direct involvement of student in empirical research. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

PSYC 4750 Special Topics (4 sem. hrs). Specialty courses from a wide variety of topics in psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

PSYC 4800 Directed Study (1–4 sem. hrs). Independent pursuit of content area selected by student. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

PSYC 4850–4853 Internship (1–4 sem. hrs). Practical experience/training in professional settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000

PSYC 4900 History and Systems (4 sem. hrs). This course reviews the historical beginnings of Psychology and the current importance of Psychology as a science and discipline. The role that Psychology has played in the human experience since its earliest origins (philosophy) to its most recent incarnations (neuroscience) will be examined. An emphasis on recent history, major advances, current theoretical applications, and future directions of Psychology will be the main focus of the course. Students will also review current methodological approaches used in the various areas of psychological research and are expected to demonstrate appropriate APA writing style and knowledge of the requirements/experience necessary to establish and maintain a career in Psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 2110 
RLST- Religious Studies Courses

RLST 1000 Religions of the World and How to Study Theme (4 sem. hours). A wide-ranging exploration of the phenomenon of religion and of the various approaches to its study.

RLST 1010–1020 Introduction to Classical Hebrew (4 sem. hours). This year-long study of classical (ancient, biblical) Hebrew will focus on mastery of grammar, vocabulary, and syntax to lay the foundation for proficient reading of Hebrew texts.

RLST 2010 Ethics and Religion (4 sem. hours). A study of moral reasoning about personal and social issues in various religious, philosophical, and cultural contexts. An Arguments course. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 2020 Classical Hebrew Readings (4 sem. hours). This semester course will focus on a wide selection of readings in Classical Hebrew, with some attention to later forms of Hebrew, including Qumran and Rabbinic. A Texts course. Offered occasionally.

RLST 2110 Judaism, Christianity, Islam (4 sem. hours). A study of the history, literature, thought, and practices of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam with attention to their Connections with one another. A Traditions (A) course. Offered occasionally. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic.

RLST 2120 Introduction to Hinduism (4 sem. hours). A study of the history, literature, thought, and practices of Hinduism in India and the West. A Traditions (B) course. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 2130 East Asian Religions (4 sem. hours). A study of the history, literature, thought, and practices of the religions of China, Korea, and Japan, including Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, and Shinto. A Traditions (B) course. Offered in alternate years. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic.

RLST 2140 Introduction to Buddhism (4 sem. hours). A study of history, literature, thought, and practices of Buddhism in its various historical and cultural contexts. A Traditions (B) course. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 2150 Introduction to Islam (4 sem. hours). A study of the history, literature, thought, and practices of Muslims around the world. A Traditions (A) course. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 2160 Introduction to Judaism (4 sem. hours). An introduction to Jewish history, culture, religion, literature, and practices. Modern forms of Jewish practice and identity will be engaged. A Traditions (A) course. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 2210 Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the history, literature, thought, and practices of ancient Israel. A Texts and Traditions (A) course. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 2220 New Testament and Early Christianity (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the background, beginnings, earliest development, and thought of Christianity. A Texts and Traditions (A) course. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 2400 The Meaning of Work (4 sem. hours). An investigation into the phenomenon that is arguably at the foundation of human civilization and the human psyche: work. The course explores issues of value, purpose, function, organization, and justice in relation to the meaning of work from a variety of perspectives, including philosophy, theology, sociology, psychology, and management. This course is the same as FWRK 2400. An Arguments course.

RLST 2610 Re-Thinking Jesus (4 sem. hours). A study of some of the most important attempts to understand Jesus’ significance, tracing christological ideas and innovations from the canonical gospels into the present. A Texts and Traditions (A) course. Offered occasionally.

RLST 2620 Christian Liberation: Race and Sex (4 sem. hours). In this course, students investigate the roots of liberation theology within Christian thought and practice, encounter the ground-breaking texts of early liberation theologians, and discuss what is at stake in discussions of Christian liberation. Students will engage with Latina/o, feminist, black, womanist, and queer theology. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 2750–2753 Special Topics (1–4 sem. hours). Areas of interest not covered in regular courses; unusual opportunities to study subjects of special interest.

RLST 2790 Religion, Peace, and Justice (4 sem. hours). An examination of the history and literature of peace advocacy with an emphasis on religious approaches to cultivating peace. An Arguments course. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 3000 Myth (4 sem. hours). A study of the symbols and motifs of mythology focusing on the myths of Greece and Rome, with comparative material introduced from Near Eastern, Native American, Asian, African, and Norse mythology. This course is the same as CLST 3000. Offered occasionally.

RLST 3110 History of Christian Thought (4 sem. hours). A study of formative figures and ideas in the history of Western Christianity. A Traditions (A) and Arguments course. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 3120 Modern and Contemporary Theology (4 sem. hours). An examination of major developments in theology from the Enlightenment to the present, with attention to such figures as Schleiermacher, Barth, Tillich, Rahner, Cone, Gutierrez, McFague, and Keller, and to contemporary movements such as liberation and process theologies. A Traditions (A) and Arguments course. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 3150 Religion, Science, and Nature (4 sem. hours). An investigation of issues raised by the relationship between Western science and classic religious traditions, including the religious roots of science, the worldview revolutions caused by scientific theories, the environmental impact of religious perspectives and practices, and environmental ethics and policy. An Arguments course. Offered occasionally.

RLST 3160 Religion and Literature (4 sem. hours). A study of religious approaches and themes in ancient and/or modern literature. A Texts course. Offered occasionally. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic.

RLST 3200 Religion, Society, and Culture (4 sem. hours). An anthropological and sociological investigation through primary texts and field experience of the relationships among religious insti- tutions and society and culture. This course is the same as SOAN 3200. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 3310 Philosophy of Religion (4 sem. hours). An investigation of issues arising from religious experience and beliefs, including the nature of the divine, evil, and human destiny. This course is the same as PHIL 3310. An Arguments course. Offered in alternate years.

RLST 3460 Biblical Poetry (4 sem. hours). A careful study of ancient Jewish poetry found in the Hebrew Bible, exploring its ancient cultural environment and with full regard to the style, passion, and emotive elements of the poetic art. A Texts course. Offered occasionally.

RLST 3600 The Educational Ministry of the Church (4 sem. hours). An examination of the purpose and implementation of Christian educational ministry. Offered occasionally.

RLST 3750-3753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours). Areas of interest not covered in regular courses; unusual opportunities to study subjects of special interest.

RLST 3900–4900 Religious Studies Seminar (4 sem. hours). Intensive reading and discussion of selected texts and issues with important implications for the theory and practice of religious studies. Topics will be announced each time the course is offered; this course may be retaken for credit with a different topic.

RLST 4800–4803 Directed Readings (1–4 sem. hours).

RLST 4850–4853 Religious Studies Internship (1–4 sem. hours). An off-campus learning experience designed in consultation with a professional in a religion-related field and a Department of Religious Studies faculty member. 
SOAN – Sociology and Anthropology Courses

SOAN 1000 Introduction to Sociology (4 sem. hours). An introductory survey of social structure and human interaction. The course offers an overview of all major sociological concepts, theories, and research methods; explores issues such as socialization, inequality, social order, and social change; and examines the roles the family, religion, mass media, and education play in our lives.

SOAN 1100 Introduction to Anthropology (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the basic concepts and approaches of the study of cultural and social patterns of human societies around the world.

SOAN 1110 Introduction to Archaeology and World Prehistory (4 sem. hours). An introductory archaeological survey of the world’s prehistoric cultures, including those in both the old and new world.

SOAN 1710 Human Origins (4 sem. hours). The various lines of evidence about human ancestry will be examined, including population genetics, paleontology, DNA and protein sequencing, “Mitochondrial Eve,” chromosome structure, behavior, and linguistics. Current literature will be reviewed. This course includes a laboratory.

SOAN 2100 Methods and Statistics (4 sem. hours). A critical introduction to issues in research design. Types of data analysis and collection covered include fieldwork, interviewing, coding qualitative data, survey design/execution/analysis, and statistical analysis of numeric/coded data. Attention is also given to what inferences can legitimately be made from data.

SOAN 2120 The Many Dimensions of Poverty (4 sem. hours). An introductory course examining American poverty as a problem for individuals, families, and societies. This course examines historical and contemporary conceptualizations and measurements of poverty, causes of poverty, and the legal, political, and social implications of poverty for society.

SOAN 2130 Marriage and Family (4 sem. hours). The anthropological and sociological study of human families from a cross-cultural perspective. Examines the origin of the human family and the nature of family life in a number of non-Western societies and in the United States.

SOAN 2210 Archaeological Method and Theory (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the practice of archaeology. Provides a basic understanding of the ways in which archaeologists study and seek to understand past human behaviors.

SOAN 2400 Women and Men in Prehistory (4 sem. hours). An examination of cultural evolution from the appearance of homosapiens until the rise of the first urban civilizations, with an emphasis on exploring the contributions made both by women and men to the process of human development, as well as on the nature of gender in the prehistoric past.

SOAN 2410 Human Ecology (4 sem. hours). The anthropology of human ecosystems examines the relationship between culture and environment. The course includes research and theory on how preindustrial societies adapt to their environments and on the ecological problems created by industrial societies. Prerequisite: SOAN 1000, SOAN 1100, or SOAN 1110, or permission of the instructor. Offered occasionally.

SOAN 2500 Sociolinguistics (4 sem. hours). A comprehensive study of language, society, and the social context of linguistic diversity. It brings together the perspectives of linguistics, anthropology, and sociology to examine multilingualism, social dialects, conversational interaction, language attitudes, and language change. Prerequisite: SOAN 1000, SOAN 1100, or SOAN 1110, or permission of instructor. Offered occasionally.

SOAN 2600 African Studies Seminar (4 sem. hours). This seminar invites students to examine Africa as a place and an object of study. Students will gain an understanding of the distinct history, characteristics, and cultures of Africa as well as its tremendous complexities. Questions related to philosophy, literature, history, and politics will be examined through text and film. This course serves as the cornerstone of the African Studies minor.

SOAN 2700 Food and Culture (4 sem. hours). This seminar-style course allows students to explore the multi-faceted Connections between the preparation and consumption of food and cultural contexts. Ethnographic studies of food will be the basis for discussions of food’s cultural importance and provide a lens into larger discussions of social and cultural theory. This course typi- cally includes shared meals that relate directly to course materials and are prepared by the students. Prerequisite: SOAN 1000, SOAN 1100, or SOAN 1110, or permission of instructor.

SOAN 2850 Special Topics in Anthropology (4 sem. hours). Areas of interest not covered in regular courses; unusual opportunities to study subjects of special interest.

SOAN 3000 An Ethnographic Vista on Tanzanian Life and Culture (4 sem. hours). This course will offer the students the opportunity to gain a deep and rich firsthand understanding of life, history, economics, and culture in East Africa. This course will begin on the Millsaps College campus with a three-day introduction to Tanzanian history and culture as well as the Swahili language. However, the main component of the course will comprise a four-week study trip to Tanzania that will allow students to engage the contemporary realities of Tanzanian culture and economics. These experiences will be accented by various trips and ethnographic activities designed to further students’ understanding of the rich and complex history of East Africa.

SOAN 3100 Summer in China (6 sem. hours). This course offers a brief yet comprehensive survey of Chinese culture and society through readings and site visits. The class is a four-week summer program (one week in Jackson and three weeks in China) that introduces students to both traditional and contemporary Chinese culture and society.

SOAN 3110 Archaeology of Selected Culture Areas (4 sem. hours). Explores the archaeological record of a selected prehistoric culture area. Emphasis is on reconstructing ancient lifeways and understanding the processes that create the archaeological record.

SOAN 3120 Non-Western Societies (4 sem. hours). The course examines both the culture of selected non-Western societies and the range of methodological and theoretical approaches used to understand them.

SOAN 3200 Religion, Society, and Culture (4 sem. hours). An anthropological and sociological investigation through primary texts and field experiences of the relationships among religious institutions and society and culture.

SOAN 3210 Urban Life (4 sem. hours). A critical anthropological and sociological examination of the theoretical and empirical literature on the social structure and culture of urban life: the development of cities, the life processes within cities, the relations between cities, and other social and cultural factors making cities more livable. Offered occasionally.

SOAN 3220 Class, Gender, Race: Social Stratification (4 sem. hours). A sociological examination of the theoretical and empirical literature on the impact of social class, gender, and race on the life course and life chances of people in selected societies. Prerequisite: SOAN 1000, SOAN 1100, SOAN 1110, junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

SOAN 3300 Health and Illness (4 sem. hours). A sociological investigation of the social and cultural factors and those formal and informal organizations shaping health and illness. Prerequisite: SOAN 1000, SOAN 1100, SOAN 1110, or permission of the instructor. Offered occasionally.

SOAN 3400 Native North America (4 sem. hours). This course examines the archaeology and history of the North American Indians, with a special focus on contemporary issues. Various chronological periods and culture areas are explored through the analysis of artifacts, historical documents, and Native American myth, literature, and poetry.

SOAN 3410 Archaeological Field School (4 sem. hours). This course instructs students in archaeological field methods. Taught at locations off campus, generally for three to five weeks. Students participate in the scientific investigation of an archaeological site through application of various survey and excavation techniques.

SOAN 3710 Social Psychology (4 sem. hours). Integrates current social and psychological theory regarding communication, group dynamics, aggression, and human relations, with its application to real-world settings. Laboratory component. This course is the same as PSYC 3170. Prerequisite: SOAN 1000, SOAN 1100, SOAN 1110, or permission of the instructor.

SOAN 3800–3802 Directed Study in Anthropology or Sociology (1, 2, or 4 sem. hours).

SOAN 4200 Social and Cultural Theory (4 sem. hours). Critical, comparative, and synthetic examinations of historical and contemporary sociological theory, including functionalism, conflict theory, phenomenology, and symbolic interactionism. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

SOAN 4700–4703 Undergraduate Research (1–4 sem. hours). Research project proposed and conducted independently by a junior or senior, with a report due at end of semester.

SOAN 4730 Geographic Information Systems and Archaeology (4 sem. hours). A seminar associated with CGMA, a collaboratory for GIS (geographic information systems) and Mediterranean archaeology. This course introduces students to the application of GIS to archaeological problems and questions. The class is taught on a rotating basis at one of four ACM/ ACS institutions; instruc- tion is conducted over the web.

SOAN 4750-4753 Special Topics in Anthropology (1 – 4 sem. hours). Areas not normally covered in other courses.

SOAN 4760 Special Topics in Sociology (4 sem. hours). Areas not normally covered in other courses.

SOAN 4770 Undergraduate Research Seminar (4 sem. hours). A seminar in sociological and anthropological research for majors, in which students learn advanced research methods and develop and complete a research project in sociology, anthropology, or archaeology. Prerequisite: SOAN 2100 and junior or senior standing.

SOAN 4800–4802 Directed Study (1, 2, or 4 sem. hours). Inquiry by a junior or senior capable of independent work with a minimum of supervision, with a report due at end of semester.

SOAN 4850–4852 Internship (1, 2, or 4 sem. hours). Practical experience and field-based training for majors working with selected organizations engaged in social research, human services, or community services.

SOAN 4900 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (4 sem. hours). A seminar in anthropological practice and theory in which students read key texts and reflect on their course of study, as well as their concentration.

SOAN 4910 Senior Seminar in Sociology (4 sem. hours). A seminar in sociological practice and theory in which students read key texts and reflect on their course of study, as well as their concentration. 
SPAN- Spanish Courses

SPAN 1000 Basic Spanish I (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the essentials of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structure. Primary emphasis on understanding and speaking. Secondary emphasis on reading and writing. Intended for students with no prior study of Spanish. Offered fall and spring.

SPAN 1010 Basic Spanish II (4 sem. hours). Continuation of Basic Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 1000 or placement test score. Offered fall and spring.

SPAN 2000 Intermediate Spanish (4 sem. hours). Building on Basic Spanish, this course focuses on the practical application of basic listening and speaking skills, and expands students’ reading and writing skills. Prerequisite: SPAN 1010 or placement test score. Offered fall and spring.

SPAN 2050 – 2053 Intermediate Conversation (1-4 sem. hours). Designed for students at the intermediate level wishing to improve their pronunciation, vocabulary, and conversational skills. Topics include Hispanic culture and current events. May be taken concurrently with a 2000-level course. Taught in Spanish. Offered occasionally during the school year with consent of the instructor.

SPAN 2110 Contemporary Hispanic Culture (4 sem. hours). This transition course concentrates on reading and writing skills in a conversational environment. It provides the insights into customs and daily culture needed for interacting effectively with Spanish speakers. Taught in Spanish. May be taken concurrently with any course in the series (2120, 2130 or 2140). Prerequisite: SPAN 2000, or its equivalent, or placement test score. Offered fall and spring.

SPAN 2130 Grammar and Composition (4 sem. hours). This transition course concentrates on writing skills through a systematic review and practice of grammatical concepts and strengthening of expository writing. Taught in Spanish. May be taken concurrently with any course in the series (2110, 2120 or 2140). Prerequisite: SPAN 2000, or its equivalent, or placement test score.

SPAN 2140 Introduction to Literature (4 sem. hours). This transition course concentrates on reading and writing skills in a conversational environment. It introduces students to literary analysis through the practice of close reading of texts from various genres and contexts. Taught in Spanish. May be taken concurrently with any course in the series (2110, 2120 or 2130). Prerequisite: SPAN 2000, or its equivalent, or placement test score. Offered fall or spring.

SPAN 2152 Learning Spanish Through Service Learning (2 sem. hours). Designed to improve students’ performance in Spanish in an immersion setting and to learn about Hispanic culture and social conditions first hand by means of service learning. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 1010.

SPAN 2750 – 2753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours). Study of specific aspects of Hispanic literature, language, or culture at the intermediate level. Taught in Spanish. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally during the school year. Prerequisite: SPAN 2000, or its equivalent, or placement test score or consent of the department chair.

SPAN 3200 Survey of Peninsular Literature up to 1700 (4 sem. hours). A close study of the principal literary works produced in Spain from the Middle Ages up to 1700. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 2140 or consent of the instructor. Offered every other year.

SPAN 3210 Survey of Spanish-American Literature through Modernism (4 sem. hours). A close study of the principal literary works produced in Spanish America from Colonial time through the 19th century. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 2140 or consent of the instructor. Offered every other year.

SPAN 3300 Survey of Peninsular Literature from the 18th Century to the Present (4 sem. hours). A close study of the principal literary works produced in Spain from the 18th century to the present. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 2140 or consent of the instructor. Offered every other year.

SPAN 3310 Survey of Spanish-American Literature from Late Modernism to the Present (4 sem. hours). A close study of the principal literary works produced in Spanish America from the early 20th century to the present. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 2140 or consent of the instructor. Offered every other year.

SPAN 3750 – 3753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours). Study of specific aspects of Hispanic literature, language, or culture at the junior level. Taught in Spanish. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Taught primarily in our summer program in Costa Rica or Yucatan. Offered occasionally during the school year. Prerequisite: One course from the series (2110, 2120, 2130, or 2140).

SPAN 3770 Modernism—Post-Modernism (4 sem. hours). A comparison, contrast, and analysis of two main periods in modern Spanish-American literature, focusing on modernist poetry, and postmodernist prose. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: Two courses from the series (2110, 2120, 2130, or 2140) or consent of the department chair. Offered occasionally.

SPAN 3780 Studies in 19th Century Peninsular Literature (4 sem. hours). This course examines selected texts produced in Spain during the 19th century. The themes and texts will vary, sometimes focusing on Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, or a selection of writers, genres and themes from the 19th century. Prerequisites 2110 and 2140 or by permission of the instructor. Offered every other year.

SPAN 3790 Studies in 20th Century Peninsular Literature (4 sem. hours). This course examines selected texts produced in Spain during the 20th century. Themes and texts may vary, sometimes focusing on the Generation of 1898, the Spanish Vanguard, post-civil war prose, postmodernism, or a combination of writers and time periods. Prerequisites 2110 and 2140 or by permission of instructor. Offered every other year.

SPAN 4750 Special Studies in Spanish (4 sem. hours). Advanced, in-depth study of specific aspects of Hispanic literature, language, or culture. Taught in Spanish. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisites: Two courses from the series (2110, 2120, 2130, or 2140) or consent of the department chair. Offered occasionally.

SPAN 4760 Cervantes (4 sem. hours). A study of the life and works of Miguel de Cervantes

Saavedra, including his short stories and plays, as well as Don Quixote de La Mancha. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: Two courses from the series (2110, 2120, 2130, or 2140) or consent of the chair of the Department of Modern Language. Offered occasionally.

SPAN 4770 Golden Age Drama (4 sem. hours). An in-depth study of representative theatrical works written in Spain between 1550 and 1681. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: Two courses from the series (2110, 2120, 2130, or 2140) or consent of the department chair. Offered occasionally.

SPAN 4800 – 4803 Directed Study in Spanish (1–4 sem. hours). For advanced students who wish to do reading and research in special areas under the guidance of an instructor. Prerequisites: Two courses from the series (2110, 2120, 2130, or 2140) and consent of the department chair. Offered as needed.

SPAN 4850 Internship (1- 4 sem. hours). An internship in which a student works, under the supervision of the Modern Languages Department, in a place where Spanish is used. Prerequisite: Two courses from the series (2110, 2120, 2130, or 2140) and consent of the department chair. Offered as needed.

SPAN 4900 Senior Seminar (4 sem. hours). Guided by a departmental instructor, students will create the senior comprehensive exam paper. Students choose readings and write on selected themes, periods, genres or writers drawn from Hispanic literature and complete the comprehensive exam essay. This course is open only to seniors majoring in Spanish and is required of all Spanish majors. At least two 3000 level literature courses taken at Millsaps are required. Offered only in fall term. 
THEA- Theatre Courses

THEA 1000 Introduction to Theatre (4 sem. hours). This course introduces students to four primary aspects of theatre practice and study: Theatrical production (including producing, directing, design, and acting); a few major eras of theatre history (ancient Greece, the Renaissance, the advent of realism, and modernisms); play analysis; and dramatic literature. The course de-mystifies aspects of performance and production while simultaneously revealing theatre as a field of rich study.

THEA 1100 Theatre Crafts I (4 sem. hours). Introduction to basic theories and practices of scenic construction, scenic painting, rigging and shifting, and practical experience in constructing sets for theatrical productions including equipment use, safety training, shop protocol, and handling stage properties, lights, and sound. Can require up to five construction hours per week plus lecture. Offered occasionally.

THEA 1410-1413; 2410-2413; 3410-3413; 4410-4413 Company Performance (1-4 sem. hours). Acting in a theatrical production sponsored by the Department of Theatre, applying methods and skills learned in coursework to actual production. Number of credit hours is determined by the department chair based on degree of participation and the value of the participation to the student’s general education and theatrical training. May be repeated for credit. Students should take the course level appropriate to their year of study. Prerequisite: Audition. Offered every semester.

THEA 1420-1423; 2420-2423; 3420-3423; 4420-4423 Company Production (1-4 sem. hours). Technical participation in a theatrical production sponsored by the Department of Theatre, applying methods and skills learned in coursework to actual production. Number of credit hours is determined by the department chair based on degree of participation and the value of the participation to the student’s general education and theatrical training. May be repeated for credit. Students should take the course level appropriate to their year of study. Prerequisite: Permission of production director. Offered every semester.

THEA 1500 Acting One: Foundations in Realism (4 sem. hours). This course introduces students to basic aspects of the Stanislavski System of acting. Topics include concentration, sensory physical work, working with emotion, making choices, and scene analysis. There are both written and performance assignments in this class. Offered every year.

THEA 2300 Basic Theatre Design (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the theory and techniques of designing for theatre, including such topics as scenic, lighting, costuming, and sound design. Offered occasionally.

THEA 2500 Acting Two: Scene Study (4 sem. hours). A continued investigation of the Stanislavski Acting System with a focus on bolstering the fundamental elements associated with the art of acting. This course familiarizes students with the actor’s tools, adding to the foundation acquired in the introductory acting class with a stronger emphasis on character objectives, tactics, and scene scoring/analysis. This course includes both written and performance assignments. Prerequisites: THEA 1500 or permission of instructor. Offered occasionally.

THEA 2750-2753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours). A sophomore level course on special issues
not regularly covered by the curriculum. Offered occasionally.

THEA 2902 Theatre Observation (1-4 sem. hours). Observation, study, and written analysis of professional theatrical productions staged in major world venues such as New York and London. May be repeated for credit. Offered occasionally.

THEA 3010 Western Theatre History I (4 sem. hours). This course examines theatre and performance practices of the past as cultural artifacts. Specific eras of theatre history will be explored in order not only to gain insight into the theatrical traditions that preceded ours, but also to learn about historical cultures that produced theatre. As the first part of a two-course sequence, this class focuses on Ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval Europe and England, and the English Renaissance. Offered occasionally.

THEA 3020 Western Theatre History II (4 sem. hours). This course examines theatre and performance practices of the past as cultural artifacts. Specific eras of theatre history will be explored in order not only to gain insight into the theatrical traditions that preceded ours, but also to learn about historical cultures that produced theatre. As the second part of a two-course sequence, this class focuses on Renaissance Italy and France, the English Restoration, German Romanticism, American Melodrama, the advent of Realism, European anti-Realisms, and contemporary American theatre. Offered occasionally.

THEA 3500 Acting Three: Building A Character (4 sem. hours). This course finalizes the work with Stanislavski System from THEA 1500 and 2500. Students will perform monologues, two- person scenes, and group scenes. This course focuses on making character choices based on a full understanding of the play as a whole. This will require students to focus their attention not only
on textual matters but also on how the text informs vocal and physical choices for communicating character. Prerequisite: THEA 1500 or 2500. Offered occasionally.

THEA 3600 Directing for the Stage (4 sem. hours). An introduction to directing theory and practice including play selection, script analysis and research, character analysis, scene analysis, casting, rehearsal planning, managing rehearsals, and blocking. This course privileges the rehearsal process, demphasizing elements of technical production. Prerequisites: THEA 1500 or 2500. Offered occasionally.

THEA 3750-3753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours). A junior level course on special issues not regularly covered by the curriculum. Offered occasionally.

THEA 4500 Acting Four: Acting Styles (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on acting styles other than the Stanislavski System. Instead of a broad overview of various styles, the class will focus on a single style each time it is offered. Styles that are offered include but are not limited to Shakespeare, high comedy, mask acting, Brechtian performance, solo performance, and ensemble devised performance. Prerequisites: THEA 3500 or permission of instructor. This course can be repeated once in meeting requirements for the minor in theatre. Offered occasionally.

THEA 4750-4753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours). A senior level course on special issues not regularly covered by the curriculum. Offered occasionally.

THEA 4800-4803 Directed Study (1-4 sem. hours). Intensive individual study on a topic of the student's an professor's choosing. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 
TRCS – Discovery (Transfer Student Compass Course)

TRCS 1050: Transfer Student Seminar - Discovery (4 sem. hours). This course combines the problem-solving and collaborative focus of the Ventures course with the communication skills development of the Connections course to give transfer students a foundation in these key elements of the Millsaps education experience. Courses will explore a focused problem or theme relevant to a particular disciplinary field to develop problem solving, collaboration, and written and oral com- munication skills.
VESO – Vocation, Ethics, and Society Courses

VESO 1011 Introduction to Community Engagement I (1 sem. hour). This one-hour course combines weekly field work with formal learning exercises. The course challenges students participating in the Wellspring Intentional Learning Program to consider the contexts, complexities, and consequences of their community engagement field work.

VESO 1021 Introduction to Community Engagement II (1 sem. hour). This one-hour course combines weekly field work with formal learning exercises. The course challenges students participating in the Wellspring Intentional Learning Program to consider the contexts, complexities, and consequences of their community engagement field work.

VESO 2000 The Meaning of Work (4 sem. hours). Students in this course will have the opportunity to use the instructor's disciplinary approach as an entry into the exploration of work within the context of wider societies and cultures. The course includes a substantial ethics component. This is the gateway course for students minoring in Vocation, Ethics, and Society.

VESO 3851 Vocational Inquiry in Context I (1 sem. hour). Students minoring in Vocation, Ethics, and Society enroll in this course concurrently with their first internship (VESO 3853). Depending on enrollment numbers, VESO 3851 may meet with VESO 4851 allowing students to converse with and offer insights for one another at various stages of their vocational inquiry. In these courses, students discuss their internship experiences and contextualize them by using academic resources offered by the instructor, according to the instructor's field of study. Prerequisite: VESO 2000.

VESO 3853: Internship I (3 sem. hours). Students are placed in internships in consultation with the director.


VESO 4851 Vocational Inquiry in Context II (1 sem. hour). Students enroll in this course concurrently with their second internship (VESO 4853). Depending on enrollment numbers, VESO 3851 may meet with VESO 4851 allowing students to converse with and offer insights for one another at various stages of their vocational inquiry. In these courses, students discuss their internship experiences and contextualize them by using academic resources offered by the instructor, according to the instructor's field of study. Prerequisite: VESO 2000.

VESO 4853: Internship II (3 sem. hours). Students are placed in internships in consultation with the director.
WOST- Women’s and Gender Studies Courses

WOST 2000 Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies (4 sem. hours). This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the field of women’s and gender studies; to the questions raised by the study of women’s experiences; to the intellectual debates surrounding the issue of gender; and to the role of these fields in the various liberal arts disciplines.

WOST 4000 Senior Project (4 sem. hours). This project consists either of an independent study with an instructor in the student’s major or a teaching practicum in the Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies course. 
WRIT- Writing Program Courses

WRIT 1000 Thinking and Writing (4 sem. hours). This course is designed to provide additional writing experience to students who have already taken Freshman Seminar.

WRIT 1001 Topics in Academic Writing (1 sem. hour). This course is designed to provide additional focus on particular issues related to academic writing.

WRIT 1011 Topics in Academic Reading (1 sem. hour). This course is designed to provide additional focus on particular issues related to academic reading.

WRIT 2001 Introduction to Teaching Writing (1 sem. hour). This course is designed to prepare prospective peer tutors to work in the Writing Center. It will introduce them to the writing process on a theoretical as well as practical level, and to theoretical and practical components of Writing Center work. Specific topics will include the role of the peer tutor, the rhetorical situation, types of academic writing, cultural perspectives, and approaches to talking about writing at various stages of the writing process. Faculty recommendation required. 

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Course Coding Policy

The course coding policy of Millsaps College is as follows:

Courses belong to a department. Each department has a four-letter department code. Each course has a four-letter subject code. A department can choose to use their department code as a subject code for every course in their department, or they may have multiple subject codes for the courses within their department.

Undergraduate courses are four numeric digits long.

  • The first digit indicates the class level with 1 primarily for first year students, 2 for sophomores, 3 for juniors, and 4 for seniors.
  • The department determines the second digit.
  • The department determines the third digit. Often times, the third digit refers to classes taken over two semesters.
    • 0 = the class is just one semester
    • 1 = it is a two-part class and this is the first semester
    • 2 = it is a two-part class and this is the second semester
  • The fourth digit indicates whether the course is a 1, 2, 3, or a 4 credit hour course. A course number ending in:
    • 1 = 1 hour credit
    • 2 = 2 hours credit
    • 3 = 3 hours credit
    • 0 = 4 hours credit

The following pertains to undergraduate courses:
• Research courses are 1700-4703
• Special Topics courses are 1750-4753
• Directed/Independent Studies courses are 1800-4853
• Internship courses are 1850-4850
• Honors courses are the course code followed by HI or HII

Graduate courses are three numeric digits long, and 500-700 codes are used.
• 500-600 classes are for the MBA and MACC programs
• 700 classes are for the EMBA program

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