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Courses

Else School of Management

From the 2012-2013 Millsaps Catalog. See a list of all current classes.

Accounting

2000 Principles of Financial Accounting (4 sem. hours). The basic concepts, systems, and terminology of accounting data in modern accounting leading to the interpretation for decision making by external users. The course emphasizes understanding of general purpose financial statements. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

2010 Managerial Accounting, Budgeting, and Systems Control (4 sem. hours). This course is a survey of principles of managerial accounting and controllership issues, including cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, absorption and variable costing methods, budgeting, performance analysis, and internal control systems. Prerequisite: ACCT 2000.

3000 Intermediate Financial Accounting I (4 sem. hours). A focus on the conceptual framework of financial reporting that emphasizes the accounting model, the rationale underlying generally accepted accounting principles, and the external disclosure consequences of corporate decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 2000 and ACCT 2010. Offered during the fall semester.

3010 Intermediate Financial Accounting II (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Intermediate Financial Accounting with a focus on issues relating to the financial reporting by public corporations, stockholders equity, long-term liabilities, cash flow, and income reporting. Prerequisite: ACCT 3000. Offered during the spring semester.

3040 International Fraud Investigation (4 sem. hours). The purpose of this course is to examine the nature, scope, and perpetrators of fraud as well as to indentify effective prevention and deterrence methods. Unlike most fraud examinations classes that introduce students to a wide variety of different frauds against organizations or consumers, this course emphasizes some more "specialized" types of frauds committed in the international community. Specifically, this course emphasizes historical investment schemes, namely the South Seas Bubble, currency counterfeiting, art forgery, and money laundering.

4000 Federal Taxation of Income (4 sem. hours). This course prepares students to examine the sources of tax law relating to individual taxpayers and to gain orientation and practical experience in preparing tax forms and meeting filing requirements. Prerequisite: ACCT 2000 and ACCT 2010. Offered during the spring semester.

4010 Auditing I (4 sem. hours). This course includes the environment of the auditing sector in business and the role of auditing in society. Topics include the legal and ethical responsibilities of accountants; professional auditing standards; the acquisition, evaluation, and documentation of audit evidence; and reports on the results of the auditing engagement. Prerequisite: ACCT 3010. Offered during the fall semester.

4020 Advanced Financial Accounting (4 sem. hours). Financial accounting and reporting for selected noncorporate entities, such as partnerships and governmental units, and for multicorporate or consolidated business enterprises. Selected accounting topics concerning multinational enterprises will be introduced. Prerequisite: ACCT 3010. Offered during the fall semester.

4030 Accounting Information Systems (4 sem. hours). Exposes students to analysis, design, and evaluation of accounting systems with emphasis on transaction processing and the related internal controls for the major accounting cycles. Also included is development of systems, flow-charting skills, and exposure to advanced computerized accounting systems. Prerequisite: ACCT 3010. Offered occasionally.

4040 Advanced Taxation (4 sem. hours). A study of the taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts. Prerequisite: ACCT 4000.

4060 Governmental/Nonprofit Accounting (4 sem. hours). Principles and applications appropriate to governmental and other nonprofit institutions. Emphasis is on budgeting and fund accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 3010.

4900 Senior Seminar: Contemporary Issues and Global Accounting (4 sem. hours). A seminar course exploring the current accounting environment and the major issues facing the accounting profession. The course also addresses the role accounting plays in the global economy. Includes group projects and oral presentations by students. Prerequisite: completion of junior-level accounting courses and enrollment in ACCT 4000 and ACCT 4010. This course is offered during the spring semester.

Special Purpose Course Numbers
4750-4753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours).
4800-4803 Directed Studies (1-4 sem. hours).
4850-4853 Internship (1-4 sem. hours).

 

Business Administration

3000 The Legal Environment of Business (4 sem. hours). An introduction to legal systems and the business-related provisions of the U.S. Constitution; to the common law of torts and business organizations; to administrative law and procedures; to regulatory programs involving labor, antitrust, and securities; and to the impact of foreign and domestic laws on international business. Prerequisite or corequisite: junior-level B.B.A. core courses. Offered during the spring semester.

4020 Business Law (4 sem. hours). Emphasis on common law contracts and Uniform Commercial Code sections dealing with sales, commercial paper, and secured transactions. Prerequisite: ADMN 4000. (Available to non accounting majors with permission of instructor.) Offered during the spring semester.

4050 International Business Law (4 sem. hours). This course introduces the international legal structures designed to regulate international trade and commerce. The student will examine the legal aspects of business with a particular emphasis on the effect of international law, treaties and governmental policies on immigration, labor, contracts, imports and exports, intellectual property, and international investments. The course will offer a comparative approach to the study of international law to demonstrate how various societal and cultural environments affect the approaches to legal systems and the enforcement of those systems.

Special Purpose Course Numbers
4750-4753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours).
4800-4803 Directed Studies (1-4 sem. hours).
4850-4853 Internship (1-4 sem. hours).

 

Economics

2000 Principles of Economics (4 sem. hours). This course investigates examination of basic micro and macro concepts of economics, including the role of economics, supply and demand, price determination, demand and production theory, costs, competition, monopoly, the role of government in the economy, national income determination, the monetary system, and fiscal and monetary policy. Prerequisites: sophomore standing is required. MATH 1210 or MATH 1220 is recommended.

2200 Economic Policy Issues (4 sem. hours). This course investigates various aspects of public policy regarding economic issues. Both macro and micro policy issues may be considered. This course is the same as PLSC 2200. Prerequisites: ECON 2000 and sophomore standing.

3000 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (4 sem. hours). This course studies the measurement and determination of the level of national income and output, aggregate demand and supply, inflation, unemployment, the theory of money and interest rates, the causes of economic cycles, and national economic policy analysis. Prerequisite: ECON 2000 and at least junior standing.

3010 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (4 sem. hours). This course examines price and output determination in markets, equilibrium, market intervention, externalities, the theory of value, production and cost theory, resource markets, and welfare and policy implications. Prerequisite: ECON 2000 and at least junior standing or consent of instructor.

3020 Money and Financial Systems (4 sem. hours). This course is a survey of both the microeconomic and macroeconomic aspects of financial systems, including market structure, behavior, and regulation of commercial banks and other financial intermediaries; the creation of money; central bank organization and monetary control; and policy issues. Prerequisite: ECON 2000 and at least junior standing.

3030 Econometrics and Applied Statistics (4 sem. hours). This course involves a study of the general linear regression model and the considerations associated with using that technique. Prerequisite: ECON 2000, MATH 1150, or consent of instructor, and at least junior standing.

3040 International Economics (4 sem. hours). This course extends and applies economic theory to international issues with an examination of world money markets, exchange rates, adjustment mechanisms, and issues. Prerequisite: ECON 2000 and at least junior standing or permission of instructor.

3050 Health Economics (4 sem. hours). This course provides an introduction to the microeconomics of health, healthcare, and health policy. Its main goals are to apply economic principles to health-related issues; to explain the social, political, and economic contexts of healthcare delivery; to explore the changing nature of health-care; and to analyze public policy from an economic perspective. Prerequisite: ECON 2000 and at least junior standing. Offered occasionally.

3060 Quantitative Methods (4 sem. hours). This course examines analytical and statistical tools useful in economic decision making. Topics will include data collection, data analysis, advanced econometric models, and the communication of quantitative thinking. Additional topics may include constrained optimization and simulations. Prerequisite: ECON 3030 and MATH 1150.

3070 Competition Among Few: Industrial Organization (4 sem. hours). This course addresses imperfectly competitive markets. Emphasis is on the structure, behavior, and performance of and public policy toward markets in which power is concentrated in the hands of a few firms. Prerequisite: ECON 2000 and junior standing. Offered occasionally.

3110 History of Economic Thought (4 sem. hours). This course traces the development of economic thought from the classical school to the present time. Prerequisite: ECON 2000 and junior standing. Offered occasionally.

3120 Labor Economics (4 sem. hours). This course examines the organization, functioning, and outcomes of labor markets. Topics include wage and employment determination, labor market discrimination, the economic impact of unions, the worker's investment in human capital, and the effects of regulation on firms and workers. Emphasis is placed on the compensation and incentives of workers. Prerequisite: ECON 2000 and junior standing.

3130 The Business of Sports (4 sem. hours). This course addresses various topics in the business of sports. Topics may include issues pertaining to stadium site selection and financing, the relationship between team and municipality, legal aspects of sports business, and other issues related to sports and society. Prerequisites: MGMT 3000, ACCT 2000, ECON 2000 and at least junior standing. Offered in alternate years.

4901 Senior Thesis I (1 sem. hour). This is a research course and is the initial preparation of a thesis on an approved topic in economics that will be used as a part of the comprehensive examination for economic majors. Prerequisite: senior standing, ECON 3000, and ECON 3010.

4902 Senior Seminar in Economics (2 sem. hours). This course includes discussion of selected topics in economics. Prerequisite: senior standing, ECON 3000, and ECON 3010.

4911 Senior Thesis II (1 sem. hour). This is a research course in which the student concludes research begun in ECON 4901. It involves the final preparation of a thesis on an approved topic in economics that will be used as a part of the comprehensive examination for economics majors. Prerequisite: senior standing and ECON 4901.

Special Purpose Course Numbers
4750-4753 Special Topics (1- 4 sem. hours).
4800-4803 Directed Study (1-4 sem. hours).
4850-4853 Internship (1- 4 sem. hours)
.

 

Entrepreneurship

3010 Innovation (4 sem. hours). This course explores the innovation generation process. Creativity is at the root of innovation; thus this course calls for a strong creative contribution to enhance and encourage problem-solving skills. Students will identify strategic opportunities, engage in idea generation, and implement screening and evaluation methods. The outcome of this process will be a concept-ready offering set for business analysis. This course will also provide students with conditions in which to learn to communicate and solve problems in a task-oriented group. Prerequisite: MRKT 3000. Offered in the spring semester.

3020 Entrepreneurial Finance (4 sem. hours). Explore the theory, principles, and practical application of entrepreneurial finance which focuses primarily on the various alternatives for raising capital for start-up enterprises and companies which have not matured to the point of being able to go public if desired. The course will expose students to the various types and stages of private businesses and the critical role they play in capital, wealth, and job creation. Course will also address the legal, regulatory, tax, and valuation implications and challenges faced by these types of businesses. Prerequisite: FINC 3000. This course is offered in the spring semester.

4010 Entrepreneurship (4 sem. hours). This course deepens the understanding of the entrepreneurial process by requiring a business plan on an original business idea developed in other entrepreneurially focused classes or on their own. Either as individuals or as a member of a small team sharing common business interests, students will research, create, write and present a plan for a viable business or nonprofit organization. Students will be coached by the instructor, and may also be matched to an appropriate entrepreneur mentor with experience in their area of interest. Prerequisite: FINC 3000, MRKT 3000, MGIS 3000, and ADMN 3000.

4020 Entrepreneurial Investments (4 sem. hours). Explore the theory, principles, and practical application of evaluating private and entrepreneurial investments ,including student exposure to actual current business investment opportunities. The course focuses on evaluating both qualitative and quantitative aspects of risk and return assessment, as well as associated valuation implications. Students are exposed to a range of investment types including technology start-ups (intellectual property); real estate, oil and gas, and others. Prerequisite: FINC 3000, MRKT 3000, MGIS 3000, and ADMN 3000.

 

Finance

3000 Principles of Corporate Finance (4 sem. hours). This course introduces corporate finance concepts. Emphasis is placed on financial decision making within the corporation in such areas as capital investment, capital structure, working capital management, and financing the firm. The student is also introduced to bond and stock valuation, and to the role of global financial markets including regulatory aspects. Prerequisite: ECON 2000 and ACCT 2000. Offered during the fall semester.

3900 Seminar in Portfolio Management (4 sem. hours). The course focuses on portfolio management, with focus on management and investments. Emphasis is on analysis of equity securities, fixed income securities, and derivatives in the context of portfolio management. Equity portfolio management is emphasized in the context of support of management of the General Louis Wilson Fund, the student-managed fund. The course requires readings, cases, field trips, projects, student research, and presentation.

4000 Advanced Finance (4 sem. hours). An advanced course in corporate finance. Selected topics include working capital management, risk analysis in capital budgeting, financing, mergers and acquisitions, international financial markets, derivative financial instruments, and capital market theory. Cases and projects are used in the course. Prerequisite: FINC 3000.

4002 Student-Managed Fund I (2 sem. hours). A course in the practice of portfolio management with focus on management of the General Louis Wilson Fund, the
student-managed portfolio. Provides an opportunity for managing the investment of College endowment funds by utilizing economic, industry, and company analysis in the context of security valuation models. Combines the study of sophisticated security analysis and portfolio theory, management, and performance measurement. To be taken during the fall semester. Prerequisite: FINC 3900 and permission of instructor.

4012 Student-Managed Fund II (2 sem. hours). A course in the practice of portfolio management with focus on management of the General Louis Wilson Fund, the
student-managed portfolio. Provides an opportunity for managing the investment of College endowment funds by utilizing economic, industry, and company analysis in the context of security valuation models. Combines the study of sophisticated security analysis and portfolio management with the practical demands of hands-on money management. Extends the study of portfolio theory, management, and performance measurement. To be taken during the spring semester. Prerequisite: FINC 3900 and permission of instructor.

4750 Topics in Finance (4 sem. hours). Several topics in finance will be considered on a rotational basis. Topics may include international finance, mergers and acquisitions, fixed income markets, speculative markets, international financial markets, and the management of risk. Prerequisite: FINC 3000 or permission of the instructor.

Special Purpose Course Numbers
4750-4753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours).
4800-4803 Directed Studies (1-4 sem. hours).
4850-4853 Internship (1-4 sem. hours).

 

Leadership

4012 & 4022 Decision Making for Business Leaders. This is a continuous course offered for 2 hours in the Fall and 2 hours in the spring semester. This course provides an introduction to the issues and challenges business leaders' face in today's global economy. The main focus of the course is case based analysis of real life business situations. Qualitative and quantitative decision making techniques are outlined. The student's analytical and persuasive skills will be sharpened and the foundations of ethical and socially responsible decision making are explored.

 

Management

2000 Introduction to Management (4 sem. hours). Provides an introduction to the arts and sciences of management. Theories of organization structure, communication, and managerial decision making are addressed. Particular emphasis is given to organizational behavior. Additionally, a detailed analysis is made of the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling functions. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Offered during the fall semester.

2020 International Business—Latin America (4 sem. hours). This is an intense course that requires students to travel and live in Latin America for at least a two-week period. Students are required to assess and understand geographic, environmental, economic, social-cultural, political, and legal factors that impact the business environment of Latin America. The course includes six hours of formal classroom instruction at Millsaps College before departure for the region, and an additional 38 hours of classroom instruction once in the region. In addition to the classroom instruction, the course provides experiential learning opportunities by requiring students to participate in field trips that expose them to the history and culture of the region, as well as to various leaders of business, industry, and government.

3020 Managerial Ethics (4 sem. hours). This course is intended to help students recognize the ethical dilemmas that employees and managers typically face in day-to-day dealings with colleagues, subordinates, bosses, customers, the public, and other stakeholders, and to provide ethical frameworks for evaluating alternative courses of action. The emphasis of the course will be on managerial decisions, including those that students are likely to encounter in the early stages of their careers. Offered occasionally.

3030 International Management (4 sem. hours). Introduction to behavioral and human resources issues facing managers of multinational corporations. Students willevaluate the effectiveness of various management practices and techniques when applied across the globe. Topics include culture, leadership, decision making, communication, motivation, and employee development, selection, and repatriation. Prerequisite: MGMT 3000.

3040 Organizational Behavior (4 sem. hours). This course explores human behavior in organizational settings using theories from multiple disciplines including psychology, social psychology, and management. Examines how theories can be applied to create a positive work environment and improve worker morale and productivity. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered occasionally.

4010 International Business (4 sem. hours). Focuses on issues and problems facing managers whose firms do business abroad. The strategic issues, operational practices, and external relations of multinational companies are analyzed through cases that bridge individual functional areas. Prerequisite: junior-level B.B.A. core courses.

4020 Human Resource Management (4 sem. hours). This course addresses contemporary human resource challenges arising out of the social, economic, and governmental environments in which organizations operate. Topics include the changing role of the human resource department in organizations, building and developing a competent workforce, issues in international human resource management, cultural diversity in the workplace, and the changing nature of labor relations. Prerequisite: junior standing.

4900 Business Strategy (4 sem. hours). Takes a searching look at the major components of strategy from an upper-level management perspective. Using case studies and simulations, this course provides a learning laboratory that integrates the knowledge and skills learned in the core courses of each function. Prerequisite: Junior-level B.B.A. core courses. Offered during the spring semester.

Special Purpose Course Numbers
4750-4753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours).
4800-4803 Directed Studies (1-4 sem. hours).
4850-4853 Internship (1-4 sem. hours).

 

Management Information Systems

3000 Management Information Systems (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on breadth of coverage rather than depth in any particular area. The topics covered include the strategic role of IT, discussion of MIS-specific computer hardware and applications, managing IT-related organizational change, systems development and outsourcing, and the Internet and electronic commerce. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor. Offered during the spring semester.

3020 E-Commerce (4 sem. hours). Course will explore the e-commerce concept in the computer lab with focus on its business processes, opportunities, limitations, issues, and risks. Modules on creating web pages, working with XML, and web programming with Java will be included. Prerequisites: CSCI 1010 or equivalent and at least junior standing.

3110 Business Networks and the Internet (4 sem. hours). Provides those responsible for technology management, strategic planning, and various aspects of organizational management with an understanding of networking, electronic communications, and the Internet. Topics will be covered from the management perspective and will include LAN, WAN, hubs, servers, various systems configurations, and Internet technologies with emphasis on implications for management. Prerequisites: junior standing.

Special Purpose Course Numbers
4750-4753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours).
4800-4803 Directed Studies (1-4 sem. hours).
4850-4853 Internship (1-4 sem. hours).

 

Marketing

3000 Principles of Marketing (4 sem. hours). Consideration of pricing, promoting, and distributing products and services to satisfy buyers' needs in an ethical and socially responsible manner, with particular attention to the impact of demographic, economic, social, environmental, political, legal, regulatory, and technological forces on domestic and global organizational marketing systems. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Offered during the fall semester.

4010 Consumer Behavior (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on the process involved when individuals or groups select, purchase, use, or dispose of products, services, ideas, or experiences to satisfy needs and desires. To consider the scope of consumer behavior, the course emphasizes the complex and interdependent relationships between marketing stimuli and the day-to-day lives of consumers. Prerequisite: MRKT 3000. Offered occasionally.

4020 Marketing Research (4 sem. hours). The course imparts an understanding of and the skills to apply the methods and techniques required for gathering, recording, and analyzing information for making marketing decisions. Prerequisites: MRKT 3000.

Special Purpose Course Numbers
4750-4753 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours).
4800-4803 Directed Studies (1-4 sem. hours).
4850-4853 Internship (1-4 sem. hours).