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Fall 2014 Core Courses

Read about the courses offered for the Core Curriculum:

 

Core 1: Freshman / Transfer Seminar in Critical Thinking and Academic Literacy

NOTE: Sections of Core 1 are divided into two groups:

Sections in group one fit schedules of students fulfilling the humanities Core with Topics courses (IDST 1200)

Sections in group two fit schedules of students fulfilling the humanities Core with Heritage (IDST 1118)

All students should decide whether they will fulfill the humanities Core with Topics or Heritage BEFORE choosing sections of Core 1.

 

Core 1 Sections ONLY For Freshmen Taking Topics (IDST 1200)

IDST 1000-01: Adventure and Survival
Instructor: Dr. Jamie Harris MTWF 8
We will focus on exploration of the natural world. We will analyze some classic adventure and survival stories and discuss human responsibility in dealing with nature. Readings include the work of Jack London, Norman Maclean, Edward Abbey, John McPhee, and Jon Krakauer.

IDST-1000-02: Children's Fantasy Literature and Film
Instructor: Dr. Laura Franey MTWF 8
This class offers a rare opportunity to merge the world of popular culture with the world of academic analysis. You'll have a chance to think and write critically about some favorite children's books, as we explore authors' and filmmakers' uses of fantasy for moral and socio-political purposes and for entertainment and enchantment. We'll read and see film versions of both classics and contemporary blockbusters, from Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland to Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory to J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.

IDST 1000-04: Science, Religion, and Politics
Instructor: Dr. Brent Hendrixson MTWF 9
Nowhere is the overlap of science, religion, and politics more evident than in the discussion of the theory of evolution. Discussions range from academic to political to downright hostile. In this course, we will examine past and present issues and modes of discussion regarding the theory of evolution, while looking at some of the scientific evidence in support of the theory. We will discuss various conversations (academic, political, and religious) regarding evolutionary theory as a means of learning how to examine evidence analytically and how to conduct an academic discussion.

IDST 1000-05: What Can We Learn From Deviant Lifestyles?
Instructor: Dr. Louwanda Evans MWF 10 Th 8
What can we learn about ourselves and our society from cults, gangs, and "Trekkies (or Trekkers)"? What can these various lifestyles tell us about social rules, appropriate behavior, and collective thought? From an interdisciplinary perspective, we will read, write, and discuss the social significance and implications of "deviant" lifestyles.

IDST 1000-08: This Digital Life
Instructor: Dr. Anita DeRouen MWF 11 Th 9
Who are we when we’re on the web? What does it mean to be “digital”? How does our understanding of our lives change when we start “living” on the internet? These and other questions will guide us through a semester-long examination of our digital lives. We’ll consider the applications which have become almost requirements for our social lives (like Facebook), our understanding of the connections we have to the technology we use, and the way words like “community” and “privacy” take on different shades of meaning when we apply them to internet culture.

IDST 1000-09: Faith, Fans, Fanatics and Nones
Instructor: Dr. James Bowley MWF 11 Th 9
Just who are we, religiously? This class is about getting to know ourselves and our neighbors in the U.S. and how and what and why people believe about God(s) and religions. We'll study recent survey reports and read essays about Americans and their religions. It will be an enjoyable "temperature taking" of U.S. religious culture and an enlightening exercise following Socrates' dictum to "know thyself."

IDST 1000-10: Freshman Seminar in Critical Thinking and Academic Literacy
Instructor: Dr. David Culpepper MW 1-2:40
In this class we will address the nature of business, leadership issues, and the nature of risk. Using readings across time and from many cultures, we will learn what others have said about business, leadership, and risk. As we consider these perspectives, our own beliefs and assumptions about business will become clearer. We will ponder numerous questions that people have been asking through the centuries. For example: How costly is a "free market"? Does the "invisible hand" of the marketplace provide a handshake or a shove? Course activities are focused on the practice and strengthening of critical thinking skills and on reading and producing (through written and oral means) the products of scholarly inquiry. Examination of readings will also afford students the opportunity to enhance their personal understanding of leadership theories, concepts, contexts, and competencies. Additionally, students should gain a greater understanding of the moral responsibilities of leadership and become better prepared to exercise leadership in service to society. Finally, students will examine the broad role of risk in our society and our attempt to understand it.

IDST-1000-11: All Politics is Local: Engagement and Participation in American Public Life
Instructor: Dr. Nathan Schrader MW 1-2:40
This course is designed to help students appreciate the importance of active participation as citizens in a pluralistic, democratic society. The course will cover concepts and frameworks for understanding civic engagement and political participation in American public life. Topics will include trends of civic life in American society, history of civic engagement in communities, community activism, political action, consensus building to achieve measurable results, and public service leadership. Students will strengthen their critical thinking skills regarding numerous social issues through the consideration of engagement at the local level. This will be achieved through structured discussions as well as activities designed to enhance oral and written expression capabilities.

IDST 1000-14: Freshman Seminar: Leadership and Society
Instructor: Dr. Damon Campbell TTh 10 W 12
Research indicates that what separates leaders from managers is vision, communications ability, understanding interpersonal behavior, creativity, and even a sense of humility. Such concepts are rarely treated in traditional management texts, but they are the elemental components of the liberal arts and the humanities. This course affords students the opportunity to enhance their personal understanding of leadership theories, concepts, contexts, and competencies, as well as to move toward an understanding of them.  Through active engagement with and reflection on literature and texts on leadership,  students should gain further understanding of the moral responsibilities of leadership and become better prepared to exercise leadership in service to society. The course is intended to assist students in learning to interpret people and situations from multiple perspectives, to envision multiple possibilities from a given situation, to move beyond literal thinking to metaphorical thinking and to synthesize ideas into meaningful concepts or theories.

IDST-1000-16: Faith and Doubt
Instructor: Dr. Shelli Poe TTh 1-2:40
Modern folks the world over have been raising critical questions about God. Does God exist? Why might people think so? Does talk about "God" make any sense in today's world? Are theistic religions wish-fulfillments and self-aggrandizing projections? Do they lead to immorality? Or could they lead to doing good? While these questions can be difficult and/or intimidating to discuss with family, friends, or in the wider public sphere, in the safe space of the classroom, we'll investigate scholarly works relating to these questions, try out various trains of thought, and consider diverse viewpoints. In Faith and Doubt, we'll use these important and controversial questions to explore and develop your critical thinking, writing, and communication skills.

Core 1 Sections ONLY For Freshmen Taking Heritage (IDST 1118)

IDST 1000-01: Adventure and Survival
Instructor: Dr. Jamie Harris MTWF 8
We will focus on exploration of the natural world. We will analyze some classic adventure and survival stories and discuss human responsibility in dealing with nature. Readings include the work of Jack London, Norman Maclean, Edward Abbey, John McPhee, and Jon Krakauer.

IDST-1000-02: Children's Fantasy Literature and Film
Instructor: Dr. Laura Franey MTWF 8
This class offers a rare opportunity to merge the world of popular culture with the world of academic analysis. You'll have a chance to think and write critically about some favorite children's books, as we explore authors' and filmmakers' uses of fantasy for moral and socio-political purposes and for entertainment and enchantment. We'll read and see film versions of both classics and contemporary blockbusters, from Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland to Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory to J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.

IDST 1000-03: Learning How the Brain Learns
Instructor: Dr. Melissa Lea MTWF 8
Decades of brain research has helped us to better understand how the brain is involved in learning and memory. This includes issues of attention, motivation, distraction, learning disabilities, context and cognitive load. This course will integrate our knowledge of these core concepts and apply it to a more practical setting, the classroom. Through exercises and discussion you will learn how to use your analytical thinking and communicating skills while you explore the brain and how it learns. We will do this by reading primary research articles in the field of neuroscience, cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, perception, and pedagogy (teaching), as well as from popular press and social media. Upon completion of this course, you will have developed an aptitude for how to translate basic brain research into practical applications that will help you become a better learner throughout your life.

IDST 1000-06: What's So Funny About That?
Instructor: Dr. Ted Ammon MWF 10 Th 8
This course examines a variety of humor: visual, verbal and print; and attempts to discover what underlies humor. That is, in short, what makes something funny? We will read scholarly material on the issue as well as consider a wide range of jokes, stories and scenes from TV, movies and comics that purport to be funny. Our task is NOT to reduce humor to sterile academic analysis, but rather to delight further in the manifold situations of existence that deserve a smile. Surely we all want to be happy -- let us discover whether humor contributes significantly to happiness and if so, why.

IDST 1000-07: Status Updates, Tweets, and Profile Pics: Identity-Cultivation on Social Media
Instructor: Dr. Julie Rust MWF 10 Th 8
Every time we upload a photo, every time we post a status update, every time we retweet a tweet, we are making deliberate choices about the virtual self we represent on social media. In this class, we will hone our communication and critical thinking skills by deeply examining the ways that new media impact the selves we feel compelled to cultivate. By reading essays, analyzing our own virtual participation, and considering the many modes that we use to "write ourselves" (words, images, design, layout, etc.), we will discuss the very real implications that our virtual participation might have at the intersections of past, present, and future. We may even begin to rethink and re-envision the choices we might make as our fingers swipe across our connected cell phone portals.

IDST-1000-12: Clarifying My Beliefs Through Writing and Discussion
Instructor: Dr. Lee Maggio TTh 10 W 12
This class uses class discussions and writing to focus on learning the skills of recognizing bias and persuasion in writing and how to prevent these in our own writing. To lean these skills - as well as to answer the three questions of "Who am I?", "How do I think and know?", and "How do I make decisions?" – We will examine and discuss writings of differing belief systems. Note- This class in not designed to change any person's ideals but to examine all the evidence surrounding an issue and to lean to fairly present the issue with evidence that firmly supports one's personal opinion on the issue.

IDST 1000-13: Economics, Sex and Social Justice
Instructor: Dr. Bill Brister TTh 10 W 12
In the Unites States, the average janitor earns $22,100 per year. The average college professor earns $62,500. The average medical doctor earns $166,400. The average CEO of a Fortune 500 company earns $12,000,000 per year (yep, you read that right, that's 12 million dollars per year). Is this a just distribution of earning power? The average male full-time worker earns $50,316 per year. The average female full-time worker earns $38,685 per year. Why do males earn more than females? The average Asian worker in the U.S. earns $72,996 per year. The average White worker earns $69,829 per year, the average Black worker earns $40,495 per year, and the average Hispanic worker earns $40,061 per year. What's up with race and earnings? Maybe these statistics don't tell the whole story. Maybe these statistics highlight some social injustices. In this class we will read, discuss, and write about different points of view on disparities in earnings and other economic issues such as access to quality education and entitlement reform.

IDST 1000-14: Freshman Seminar: Leadership and Society
Instructor: Dr. Damon Campbell TTh 10 W 12
Research indicates that what separates leaders from managers is vision, communications ability, understanding interpersonal behavior, creativity, and even a sense of humility. Such concepts are rarely treated in traditional management texts, but they are the elemental components of the liberal arts and the humanities. This course affords students the opportunity to enhance their personal understanding of leadership theories, concepts, contexts, and competencies, as well as to move toward an understanding of them.  Through active engagement with and reflection on literature and texts on leadership,  students should gain further understanding of the moral responsibilities of leadership and become better prepared to exercise leadership in service to society. The course is intended to assist students in learning to interpret people and situations from multiple perspectives, to envision multiple possibilities from a given situation, to move beyond literal thinking to metaphorical thinking and to synthesize ideas into meaningful concepts or theories.

IDST-1000-15: Major Voices, Millsaps Stories
Instructor: Dr. Stephanie Rolph TTh 1-2:40
Your Millsaps story is just beginning, and this class will help you tell it. Throughout the semester, students will engage with the voices of Millsaps--past, present, and future, through a storytelling project in which oral histories from the Millsaps community will be collected as part of a permanent archive. In this course, you will learn how to capture those stories, pass them down, and make them meaningful through diverse presentation formats. By the end of the semester, your voice will be a part of this community and your story will be added to the Millsaps archive.

IDST-1000-16: Faith and Doubt
Instructor: Dr. Shelli Poe TTh 1-2:40
Modern folks the world over have been raising critical questions about God. Does God exist? Why might people think so? Does talk about "God" make any sense in today's world? Are theistic religions wish-fulfillments and self-aggrandizing projections? Do they lead to immorality? Or could they lead to doing good? While these questions can be difficult and/or intimidating to discuss with family, friends, or in the wider public sphere, in the safe space of the classroom, we'll investigate scholarly works relating to these questions, try out various trains of thought, and consider diverse viewpoints. In Faith and Doubt, we'll use these important and controversial questions to explore and develop your critical thinking, writing, and communication skills.

Sections for Transfer Students

IDST-1050-01: Writing Ecologically and the Ecology of Writing
Instructor: Dr. Richard Boada MTWF 9
Poet A.R. Ammons writes, "we are not alone in language: we may be alone in words, at least, almost alone in speaking them, not alone in understanding them." The written word is itself one of the greatest barriers between the human and the non-human, and one may argue that the use of words is a defining characteristic of what it means to be human.  From the moment humans began to speak and write about the natural world in which they lived, they engaged in the act of giving voice to that which had none.  At the same time, language is one of our greatest tools for articulating, understanding and fostering our relationship to that which is non-human.  In this course we will explore concepts of ecology, as the study of living organisms and their relationship to environment, and we will also explore how individuals write about, talk about, and depict their relationships with the environment, whether natural, human constructed, or a hybrid of the two. This course will draw from a selection of texts, including essays, poetry, fiction and films, which challenge us to think about the human and non-human spheres writers occupy, how they locate themselves in texts, and how they use words and language to effectively write about the environment. 

IDST-1050-02: Read, Write, Reach
Instructor: Dr. Priscilla Fermon TTh 10 W 12
READ --- a text entitled Writing Analytically with Readings, second edition. Part One, as described in the book's preface, focuses on "giving students the tools they need in order to engage in the analytical habits of mind that will be expected of them in their courses and in the world they encounter after graduation" (xxv – xxvi). Part Two covers a wide-range of topics, topics such as manners, communication and technology; race ethnicity and the "melting pot"; the language of politics and the politics of language. WRITE --- commentaries aimed at practice using various tools that will help you develop the kind of analytical skills needed for the papers you will produce here and beyond. REACH --- a better understanding of tools to use as you analyze what others wrote as well as improve what you write.

 

Core 2-5: The Heritage Program

IDST 1118: Heritage of the West in World Perspective MW 1-2:15, TTH 9 with discussion sections at MWF 9 or MWF 11
Beginning with antiquity and continuing to the present, this program brings together history, literature, philosophy, religion, and the arts in an integrated approach to the study of Western culture within a global context. It is the equivalent of eight semester hours each semester, and extends throughout the year. In the spring, this course examines developments in Western culture from 1500 to present in the context of world history. Heritage meets the Fine Arts requirements as well as the requirements of Core 2-5. Enrollment is limited to freshmen.

Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Patrick Hopkins MWF 9
Section 02: Instructor: Dr. David Davis MWF 9
Section 03: Instructor: Dr. Anne MacMaster MWF 9
Section 04: Instructor: Dr. Steve Smith MWF 9
Section 05: Instructor: Dr. Patrick Hopkins MWF 11
Section 06: Instructor: Dr. David Davis MWF 11
Section 07: Instructor: Dr. Anne MacMaster MWF 11
Section 08: Instructor: Dr. Steve Smith MWF 11 



Core 2: Introduction to the Ancient World

IDST 1200-01: Legends of the Fall: Myth and Tradition in Book of Genesis and the Ancient Mediterranean World
Instructor: Dr. Bennie Reynolds MTWF 9
Are humans fallen? Have we changed our world or ourselves for the worse? People all over the ancient Mediterranean world thought about these questions. Luckily, many of their ideas are preserved in the myths and legends they left behind. In today’s world words like myth and legend are often used to describe stories that are “false” or “apocryphal.” Careful scrutiny reveals that societies construct myths and legends in order to articulate and transmit their highest values, their greatest fears, and their own versions of history.  In other words, myths and legends tell us about what really matters to people.  We’ll dive into some of the most famous literary traditions from the ancient Mediterranean World. The biblical book of Genesis will form a home-base for our explorations since it collects, adapts, and re-invents a wide variety of stories that were widespread in the ancient Near East. These stories address some of the most pressing questions faced by humans: the origin and ongoing problem of evil, the rise of urban civilization, the problems of cultural differences, and the proper roles of religion, law, and family. Alongside Genesis, we’ll read the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Adapa Story, the Prometheus myths, the Apocryphon of John, and the Book of Jubilees. The questions of greatest concern for ancient peoples remain today. And ancient voices may very well have crucial insights for modern problems.
Focus: Religion

IDST-1200-02: Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
Instructor: Dr. Holly Sypniewski  MWF 11 Th 9
Gay marriage?  People of antiquity were just as obsessed as we are with determining, regulating and legislating acceptable behaviors for men and women in their public and private lives. This course examines issues of sex, sexuality, and gender in the ancient societies of Greece and Rome through the study of literature and art.  Using an historical framework, we will investigate modes of sexuality and the representation of gender.  We will analyze a range of sources to discover what we know and what we cannot know about the lives of ancient men and women, their interactions and their roles in culture and society. 
Focus: Literature

IDST 1200-03: Kiss Me, Kill Me! Violence and Friendship in the Ancient World
Instructor: Dr. Kristen Golden   MW 2:45
Despite a legacy of awesome technological achievements, America cannot seem to avoid war and its horrors. In this, our nation and cultural fabric are certainly not unusual. The theme of violence whether external, like war and homicide, or internal, like personal anguish, comes up repeatedly in ancient texts. In this course we will read some of the most beautiful and unforgettable literature and philosophy every written. The texts will span the cultures of Mesopotamia, Greece and India, and will present the human condition as a perplexity or ailment in need of being fixed! If these traditions agree that humans need fixing, they don't agree on what the problem is or on how to treat it. As we address the broad questions of human fulfillment, we will ask why violence is so pervasive in classic texts and what relationship the experience and theme of violence has to the big questions humans have asked about life's meaning through the ages. Finally, in many of the texts, cultural wisdom is conveyed through stories of friendships profound and ordinary. Just how does the idea of friendship figure in this inquiry into violence and the human predicament? What role does it seem to play among proposals for how humans flourish? These questions and themes will absorb us throughout the course as we discover lasting connections between ancient problems and remedies, and contemporary ones.
Focus: Philosophy and Literature

IDST 1200-04: Sex, Religion, and Prehistory
Instructor: Dr. Robert McElvaine  TTh 10 W 12
After an examination of the effects of evolution on human nature, this course will explore the consequences of the disruption in human life caused by the invention of agriculture and the enormous changes in all phases of human life that resulted. Effects on the roles of women and men, on scientific understanding, and on religious outlooks in the Neolithic and Ancient worlds will be discussed.
Focus: History and Religion

IDST 1200-05: Warfare and Society in the Ancient World
Instructor: Dr. David Yates TTh 1-2:40
The tools and techniques of ancient warfare were crude, but effective. States like Assyria, Persia, Athens, Macedonia, and Rome managed to carve massive empires out of the ancient Mediterranean basin that shaped the course of ancient history. Each enjoyed the benefits and ultimately suffered the unintended consequences of the war-machines that made these empires possible. Athens and Sparta's obsession with warfare secured their freedom in the face of Persian aggression, but it also condemned them to a century and a half of constant conflict that left both easy pickings for Alexander the Great. Rome's legions were the most fearsome force unleashed upon the ancient world, but the power and influence held by the army and its generals were the ultimate undoing of this thousand-year empire. In this course we shall examine in detail the weapons, tactics, and strategies of ancient warfare, the ideologies and beliefs of the common soldiers, and finally the larger place warfare had in the various societies of the ancient Mediterranean, particularly Greece and Rome.
Focus: History

IDST 1200-06: Gods of Ancient Epic
Instructor: Dr. Michael Gleason MWF 10 Th 8
Examining Mesopotamia, India, Greece, and Rome, this course explores Ultimate Reality as he/she/it is portrayed in some of the world's most beautiful and influential works of literature.  By asking, "What is an epic?" and "What is God?" we hope to determine how ancient societies viewed the proper relationship between the human and the divine and what we have inherited of their view. In addition to grand questions of fate, mortality, and justice, we also consider conventions of literary form, including the elements of epic, tradition and innovation, prose vs. poetry, authorial anonymity vs. literary fame.
Foci: Literature and Religion   

Core 4: Introduction to the Modern World

IDST 2400-01: The World We Don't Know: Modernism in the Long Nineteenth Century
Instructor: Dr Stephanie Rolph MTWF 9
Nineteenth century hippies? Absolutely. Revolutions and innovations during the nineteenth century suggested that the world was an uncertain and unpredictable place. When Enlightenment theory failed to create the utopia philosophers promised, modernism appeared as the most practical alternative, focusing on process over result. Modernist theory took experience as its guide, while recognizing that not even experience was predictive. Placed within the context of global events in the long nineteenth century, this class looks at historical events through the lens of modernism and vice versa, using art, literature and politics as source material.
Focus: History

IDST 2400-02: Introduction to Latin American Studies
Instructor: Dr. Ramon Figueroa MWF 11 Th 9
Placing a particular emphasis on the period of national formation in the nineteenth century, this class will explore the variety of views that enter into the composition of Latin American identity. While taking into consideration the multicultural matrix that centers the many identities of Latin America, we will also look at the issues that unite the region and the common challenges and tensions that have faced and continue to face the nations of the area as they try to enter into the world of globalization. Cross-lists with LAST 2000-01.
Focus: History

IDST 2400-03: The Development of Modernity in 19th Century Art
Instructor:  Dr. Monica Kelley MWF 11 Th 9
This class will explore innovative movements in the visual arts during part of the 19th century and up though World War I, in Europe as well as selected other cultures. We will consider the influence of artistic exchanges between Europe and Latin America in addition to examining the rise of mural painting as a result of the Mexican Revolution. We'll also discuss the impact of the new medium of photography on European artists and will see how the opening of trade with Japan and the rise of imports from Africa had a profound impact on them. The course will be focused on the analysis of painting and sculpture, but we’ll set the visual arts in the larger cultural and historical context of the period.
Focus: Fine Arts

IDST 2400-04: The First World War
Instructor: Dr. William Storey MW 1-2:40
The First World War is a turning point in world history. Together we will examine the long-term and short-term causes of the war, then we will consider the effects of war in Europe as well as the Middle East, Africa, India, and East Asia. Readings will include historical documents and works by historians. We will also discuss works of art, music, and literature.
Focus: History

IDST 2400-05: Manifest Destiny
Instructor: Dr. Eric Griffin TTh 10
This course will consider the importance of American Exceptionalism—better known as "Manifest Destiny"—in our national consciousness. We will begin by exploring the early colonial ventures at Jamestown and Plymouth, pause to consider the roots of the American Revolution, then move westward via the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark Expedition, the Mexican-American War and the California Gold Rush. After pausing to think about how the Civil War complicates both this period of unprecedented expansion and our nation's sense of "election," we will continue moving westward as our nation's victory in the Spanish-American War propels the United States to global prominence at the end of the 19th century. While our major interdisciplinary focus will be on the connections between Literature and History, our materials will come from the fields of geography, philosophy, religion and the visual arts as well. In order to bring the issues we raise closer to home by observing how our theme enters the popular mind via the motion picture medium, we will meet several evenings during the course of the semester to view and critique some classic (and not-so-classic) American films. Course credit may be applied to the Latin American Studies major.
Focus: Literature and History

IDST 2400-06: Revolution and Romanticism
Instructor: Dr. Lynn Raley TTh 1-2:40
Music can reflect big questions of culture, history, identity, desire, and meaning—if we know how to access it through attentive listening. This course is about making connections between the Romantic worldview and three important artistic creations of the Romantic era. The primary focus of the course is music, but the approach will be multi-disciplinary, touching on history, philosophy, art, and literature. Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, Symphonie Fantastique by Berlioz, and a major Romantic opera will be studied in depth. With these three works as a framework, we will explore how the Age of Revolutions also reflected a revolution in musical expression.
Focus: Fine Arts


 

Core 6: Topics in Social and Behavioral Science

IDST 1610-01: Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Instructor: Dr. Stacy DeZutter MW 1-2:40
Human development permeates every aspect of our lives from our own individuation to our families, our work, and the rearing of our children. One can argue that all the compartmentalized studies of the social and behavioral sciences have as a source of origin human growth and development. It encompasses one's entire experience within this world. Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective demands an immediate and personal perspective, as well as a multi-disciplinary approach including such disciplines as psychology, biology, sociology, anthropology, education, and others.

IDST 1660-01: Problems in Human Creativity
Instructor: Dr. Stacy DeZutter MWF 10
This course explores social-sciences-based approaches to understanding, explaining, and enhancing creativity. The course will provide an interdisciplinary perspective on topics foundational to any effort to augment one’s own creativity or that of others, including how creativity can be understood as both an individual and a social phenomenon, what processes are involved in creativity and innovation, and how creativity can be fostered in individuals and in groups. Students consider how disparate lines of research converge, conflict, and complement one another in order to understand a complex human process, and they begin to formulate questions of their own for further investigation. Cross-lists with EDUC 3250.

ECON 1000-01: Principles of Economics    Instructor: Dr. Susan M. Taylor TTh 1-2:40

PLSC 1000-01: Introduction to American Government   Instructor: STAFF MWF 9

PSYC 1000: Introduction to Psychology
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Kathryn Hahn MTWF 8
Section 02: Instructor: Dr. Andrew Thaw MTWF 9

SOAN 1000-01: Introduction to Sociology  Instructor: Dr. Ming Tsui MWF 9

SOAN 1100-01: Introduction to Anthropology   Instructor: STAFF TTh  1-2:15

SOAN 1110-01: Intro. to Archaeology and World Prehistory  Instructor: Dr. Veronique Belisle  MWF 10


Core 7 or 9: Topics in Natural Science with Laboratory

Note: This is a 4 cr. requirement. All labs (1 cr.) and lectures (3 cr.) are co-requisite courses and must be taken in the same semester.

BIOL 1003: Introductory Cell Biology (3 cr.)
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Sabrice Guerrier MWF 8
Section 02: Instructor: Dr. Sabrice Guerrier MWF 9
Section 03: Instructor: Dr. Hussa MWF 10

BIOL 1001: Introductory Cell Biology Lab (1 cr.)
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Sabrice Guerrier M 1-4
Section 02: Instructor: Dr. Sabrice Guerrier T 1-4
Section 03: Instructor: Dr. Hussa W 1-4

BIOL 1013-01: General Botany (3 cr.)  Instructor: Dr. Debora Mann MWF 8

BIOL 1011-01: General Botany Lab (1 cr.)   Instructor: Dr. Debora Mann T 1-4

BIOL 1023-01: Zoology (3 cr.)  Instructor: Dr. Markus Tellkamp MWF 10

BIOL 1021-01: Zoology Lab (1 cr.)  Instructor: Dr. Markus Tellkamp W 1-4

BIOL 1730-01: Explore the Natural World (4 cr.)   Instructor: Dr. Debora Mann     TTh 10 and Th 1-4
An introduction to science and the methods of science for students who are not planning to major in the sciences but who are interested in learning more about the plants, animals, and other organisms around us, including their ecology, evolution, and relationships with people. Issues of global importance regarding the conservation of biodiversity are investigated using local examples as case studies.  Fulfills Core 7 or 9 requirements but does not fulfill requirements for B.S. degree or for a major or minor in biology.

CHEM 1213: General Inorganic Chemistry I (3 cr.)
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Kristina Stensaas MWF 9
Section 02: Instructor: Dr. Cory Toyota MWF 10
Section 03: Instructor: Dr. Lee Maggio MWF 11
Section 04: Instructor: Prof. Karen Ward TTh 10

CHEM 1211: General Inorganic Chemistry I Lab (1 cr.)
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Cory Toyota M 1-4
Section 02: Instructor: Dr. Cory Toyota T 1-4
Section 03: Instructor: Dr. LeeMaggio W 1-4
Section 04: Instructor: Prof. Karen Ward Th 1-4

GEOL 1000-01: The Physical Earth (4 cr.)  Instructor: Dr. Jamie Harris MWF 9, Lab W 1-4

GEOL 1200-01: Geosystems (4 cr.)  Instructor: Dr. Zachary Musselman MWF 10, Lab T 1-4

PHYS 1001-01: General Physics Lab (1 cr.)  Instructor: Dr. Shadow Robinson W 1-4

PHYS 1003-01: General Physics (3 cr.)  Instructor: Dr. Shadow Robinson MWF 10

PHYS 1201: College Physics Lab (1 cr.)
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Asif Khandker M 1-4
Section 02: Instructor: Dr. Gulhan Gurdal T 1-4

PHYS 1203: College Physics (3 cr.)
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Gulhan Gurdal MWF 9
Section 02: Instructor: Dr. Asif Khandker MWF 11

Core 8: Topics in Mathematics (fulfills Core 8 only)

MATH 1130-01: Elementary Functions
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Emlee Nicholson  MTWF 8
Section 02: Instructor: Dr. Connie Campbell  MWF 10 Th8
Section 03: Instructor: Dr. Connie Campbell  MWF 11 Th 9

MATH 1150: Elementary Statistics
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Emlee Nicholson  MTWF 9
Section 02: Instructor: Prof. Tracy Sullivan  MWF 10 Th 8
Section 03: Instructor: Prof. Tracy Sullivan  MWF 11 Th 9
Section 04: Instructor: Dr. Pamela Smith   MW 1

MATH 1210, 1220, 2230 or 2310 (specific class information listed below)

Core 8 or 9: Topics in Mathematics, Natural Science, or Computer Science

MATH 1210-01: Survey of Calculus   Instructor: Dr. Mark Lynch MWF 11 Th 9

MATH 1220: Analytical Geometry & Calculus I
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Mark Lynch MTWF 8
Section 02: Instructor: Prof. Gayla Dance MTWF 9
Section 03: Instructor: Prof. Gayla Dance MWF 10 Th 8
Section 04: Instructor: Dr. Yan Wang  TTh 10 W12

MATH 2230-01:Analytical Geometry & Calculus II   Instructor: Prof. Tracy Sullivan TTh 10 W 12

MATH 2310-01:Intro to Advanced Mathematics   Instructor: Dr. Emlee Nicholson MWF 11 Th 9


Core 9: Topics in Mathematics, Natural Science, or Computer Science (Core 9 only)

CSCI 1010-01: Computer Science I    Instructor: Dr. Yan Wang  MWF 10 Th 8

Fine Arts Requirement

In addition to completing the requisite Core courses, all students must demonstrate proficiency in the fine arts in one of the following ways:

  • Any IDST course with a Fine Arts focus;
  • The two semester Heritage sequence;
  • Completing four semesters of private study of voice, an instrument, or class piano;
  • Completing four hours in Singers;
  • Significant participation in four Millsaps Players productions will satisfy the fine arts requirement;
  • Any of the 4 credit courses listed below will meet the Fine Arts requirement. Courses that are only 2-credit hours must be paired with another 2-credit course taken in another semester.

 

Fall 2014 Courses the Fulfill the Fine Arts Requirement

ARTS 2200-01: Beginning Drawing   Instructor: Prof. Kristen Tordella-Williams M 1-4 W 2

ARTS 2210-01: Beginning Painting   
Instructor: Prof. Sandra Murchison T 1-4 W 1

ARTS 2230-01: Beginning Printmaking   
Instructor: Prof. Sandra Murchison Th 1-4 W 1

ARTS 2250-01: Beginning Sculpture   Instructor: Prof. Kristen Tordella-Williams Th 1-4 W 3

ARTS 2260-01: Beginning Digital Arts   Instructor: Prof. Kristen Tordella-Williams T 1-4 W 3

ARTS 2500-01: Survey of Ancient and Medieval Art   Instructor: Dr. Elise Smith MWF 10 Th 8

ARTS 2570-01: Contemporary Art    Instructor: Dr. Monica Kelley MTWF 9

MUSC 1002-01: Creating Music @ the Computer (2 cr.)   Instructor: Dr. Timothy Coker  MWF 10

MUSC 2100-01: History of Jazz   Instructor: Dr. Lynn Raley TTh 1-2:40

THEA 1000-01: Intro to Theatre   Instructor: Prof. Peter Friedrich TTh 1-2:40

THEA 2750-01: Improvisation   Instructor: Prof. Peter Friedrich MW 1-2:40