Courses in History

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HIST 2100 History of the United States to 1877 (4 sem. hours).

A survey of the cultures and history of the peoples that lived in the area that became the United States, from the pre-Columbian era through European colonization, the introduction of African slaves, the American Revolution, the early Republic, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

HIST 2110 History of the United States Since 1877 (4 sem. hours).

A survey of the main developments in the United States and how they affected American men and women from the end of Reconstruction through industrialization and urbanization, the emergence of the United States as a world power, the rise of a partial welfare state, the Cold War, and the present.

HIST 2120 History of Mississippi (4 sem. hours).

The course examines Mississippi’s history through its geography, demography, economy, politics, and culture. The interactions of these categories and their collective impact on contemporary issues in the state will be explored at length. Special emphasis will be placed on the positions of power that the migration to the state brought to bear among competing indigenous nations, between those nations and white migrants, and the interactions of white and black Mississippians through the institutions of slavery, the process of emancipations, and the struggle for equality.

HIST 2310 Ancient European History (4 sem. hours).

A survey of the Mediterranean world from the Bronze Age to 200 C. E., with a topical emphasis on classical Greece, the late Roman Republic, and the Early Roman Empire, and with a methodological stress on reading, analyzing, and interpreting ancient sources in translation. (This course is the same as CLSC 2030). Offered in alternate years.

HIST 2350 History of Modern Europe—Enlightenment to the Fall of Soviet Communism (4 sem. hours).

This course is a survey of the major social, political, economic, and intellectual developments in European history from the French Revolution of 1789 to the revolutions in Eastern Europe in 1989/1990. Lectures and discussions will be devoted to understanding the influence of ideology (liberalism, conservatism, socialism, nationalism) on social and political life; the role of material factors (economic change, urbanization, the experience of warfare) in historical change; and the global expansion of Europe and the extension of European ideas and institutions to other peoples of the world.

HIST 2400 African History and Society (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary survey of major themes in African history from the earliest records of human activity on the continent to the struggles for South Africa. Literature, music, art, and popular culture will be studied as ways of understanding the complex contemporary issues faced by Africans. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 2410 Topics in African History (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary examination of a particular topic, period, or region in African history. The topics, which include the shaping of South Africa and listening to the African past, will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

HIST 2500 Middle Eastern History and Society (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary survey of major themes in Middle Eastern history from the advent of Islam to the war in Iraq. Literature, music, art, and popular culture will be studied as ways of understanding the contemporary issues faced by men and women of this region. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 2600 Colonial Latin America (4 sem. hours).

This course will begin by surveying pre- Colombian societies and then follow Latin American history from 1492 to the independence era of 1791–1825. It will consider the central questions of how Spain and Portugal subjugated territories so vast without a large standing army, and the colonial roots of the differences between British North America and Spanish and Portuguese America.

HIST 2610 Modern Latin America (4 sem. hours).

This course will survey Latin American history from the independence era to the present. There will be a particular focus on Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina. Themes considered include nation building, revolutions, populism, race and class, the mass media, democratization, and relations with Europe and the United States.

HIST 2750 Special Topics in History (4 sem. hours).

This course addresses areas not covered in other courses. It may be repeated for credit with different topics. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3100 Topics in American Culture (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary exploration of a particular topic in American culture. Topics will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3110 Colonial America (4 sem. hours).

This course examines major economic and political events, such as the European settlement of Jamestown, Virginia, and the Salem Witch Trials. But this is not a survey of colonial American history; instead it is primarily a social and cultural exploration of four regions (the Chesapeake, New England, the Carolina, and Louisiana/ Mississippi) where Europeans, Indians, and Africans together built what would become the United States of America. Thus, the class will learn about colonial Native American family structure and the working lives of black slaves, in addition to studying more popular figures like Cotton Mather and John Smith.

HIST 3140 Civil War and Reconstruction (4 sem. hours).

An examination of the political, economic, military, diplomatic, and social aspects of the Civil War and Reconstruction periods.

HIST 3160 The History of Medicine and Health in the U. S. (4 sem. hours).

This course examines the history of medicine and health from the colonial era to the present. It takes a cultural and social perspective. Emphasis will be paid to the ways in which politics, cultural beliefs, and religious values have been an integral part of the history of medicine and public health. Readings, lectures, and discussion will focus on the practice of medicine; they will examine healers, patients, therapies, and medical innovations. The course will cover such topics as the emergence of the medical profession, the rise of the hospital, the roles of the laboratory and medical technology in modern medicine, and the range of choices faced by physicians and patients in their efforts to promote health. Students will produce a scholarly paper based on original research in medical history at the Mississippi State Archives.

HIST 3170 African-American Heritage (4 sem. hours).

This course will explore the history and culture of African-Americans from the Colonial era to the Civil Rights decades of the mid-20th century. Careful attention will be paid to the Atlantic slave trade, slavery, emancipation, Reconstruction, the “Great Migration” of 1915–40, and the civil rights movements of the 1950s and ’60s. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3180 Immigrations and Migrations in American History (4 sem. hours).

This course explores the history of immigration and migration patterns over the course of American history. Beginning with the migrations of indigenous peoples through the North American continent, the course tracks the impact of European, Asian, and African immigrations from the colonization period to the present. Urban/suburban migrations and other movement patterns will also be examined closely as a way to better understand the nature of the geographic movement and its interactions with political, economic, social, and cultural events.

HIST 3210 The Great Depression (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary examination of American history and culture during the Great Depression (1929–41), utilizing literature, film, music, painting, and photography, as well as more traditional historical sources. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3220 The Forties and Fifties (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary examination of American history and culture from World War II through the 1950s, utilizing literature, film, music, and painting, as well as more traditional historical sources. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3230 The Sixties (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary examination of American history and culture during the 1960s, utilizing literature, film, music, painting, and sculpture, as well as more traditional historical sources. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3240 The Seventies and Eighties (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary examination of American history and culture from the Nixon years through the 1980s, utilizing literature, film, music, and painting, as well as more traditional sources. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3260 Women (and Men) in America (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary examination of the history of women and the ways in which they have interacted with men and male-dominated institutions over the course of American history. The course will employ works of literature, art, film, and music among its means of exploring the changing lives of women and men in America. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3300 Topics in European Culture and History (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary examination of a particular topic, period, or region of European culture. Topics will change. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3310 Conquests and Cultures—The Making of Early Britain (4 sem. hours).

The British Isles were settled by successive waves of migrants and conquerors, including Celts, Romans, Picts, Angles, Saxons, Vikings, and Normans. This course examines the development of a multicultural British society. Students will consider language, art, music, and material culture, as well as the ways in which different men and women articulated their ideas about liberty and power. While chartering the development of a modern government and society, students will examine British relations with Europe, as well as the effects of famine, disease, and disputes about religion. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3320 Conquests and Cultures—The Expansion of the British World (4 sem. hours).

The British Empire spanned the globe, bringing British ideas and values to every continent. This course will search for the roots of British power through an examination of governments, laws, technologies, and businesses. Peaceful and violent encounters with the people of Ireland, India, Africa, and China will be considered extensively, as will the settlement of North America, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. Students will study Britain’s role in the world wars, the Empire’s subsequent collapse, and the influence of new migrants from Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean on contemporary British culture. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3340 History of the French and Haitian Revolutions through the Age of Napoleon (4 sem. hours).

This course aims to give a thorough introduction to the French Revolution and its effects on the course of world history. The scope of the course will cover politics, social conflict, cultural developments, warfare, economics, nationalism, and gender relations. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3350 History of Modern France and Colonies (4 sem. hours).

This course examines the history of modern France—the political, social, cultural, economic, scientific, artistic, ideological, and institutional history of France as a nation and the French as a people from the age of absolutism (roughly 1650) to the socialist era of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular attention will be paid to construction of the French nation, cultural and social self-definition, colonial interaction, and sociopolitical relationships between France and other nations. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3360 European Women (4 sem. hours).

This course examines the experience of women and the meaning of gender in Europe from the 18th century to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of industrialization on the European family, the Victorian construction of separate spheres, the role of the state in defining gender roles and regulating sexuality, the impact of war on gender relations, and the struggle for political rights. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3370 Art and Power in Europe: Ritual, Myth, and Propaganda, from the Emperor Augustus to the House of Windsor (4 sem. hours).

This course analyzes the role of rituals, myths, and propaganda in politics. Throughout Western history, cultural means have been used to create, express, or legitimate political power. This course investigates how paintings, films, poems, and ceremonies have been manipulated to bolster the political authority of rulers, including Louis XIV, Hitler, and Elizabeth II. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3380 History of Sexuality in Europe (4 sem. hours).

This course examines the history of sexuality in Europe, with comparisons to ancient and medieval periods. We will explore sexual practices among Victorians, the influence of non-western cultures on Europeans' understanding of sex, regulation of prostitution as protection and punishment, and development of sexology as an area of study. We will analyze the work of feminists as pro-/anti-sex. Finally, we will study homosexuality among all populations, but especially in urban areas during the twentieth century.

HIST 3410 First World War: a Global Approach (4 sem. hours).

This course will survey the origins, course, and outcomes of the First World War, paying attention to developments in Europe as well as Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Americas.

HIST 3420 The Second World War: A Global Approach (4 sem. hours).

This course will survey the origins, course, and outcomes of the Second World War, paying equal attention to the fighting in Europe and Asia, as well as the global impact of the conflict.

HIST 3500 Topics in Middle Eastern History (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary examination of a particular topic, period, or region in Middle Eastern history. The topics, which include the Twice-Promised Land and Islam in History, will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Offered in alternate years.

HIST 3710 Environment, Technology, and Power (4 sem. hours).

This course will address the mutual shaping of environmental, technological, and political changes by looking at case studies from around the world. Particular attention will be paid to agriculture, climate, and disease, as well as energy, forestry, and industry.

HIST 3750 Special Topics in History (4 sem. hours).

This course addresses areas not covered in other courses. It may be repeated for credit with different topics. Offered occasionally.

HIST 3760 Special Topics in Comparative World History (4 sem. hours).

An interdisciplinary examination of a topic in comparative world history. Offered occasionally.

HIST 4750 Special Topics in History (4 sem. hours).

This course addresses areas not covered in other courses. It may be repeated for credit with different topics. Offered occasionally.

HIST 4800–4803 Directed Study (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours).

Offered occasionally.

HIST 4810–4813 Internship—Archives (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours).

HIST 4820 Teaching Internship (4 sem. hours).

HIST 4850–4853 History Internship (1, 2, 3, or 4 sem. hours).

Offered occasionally.

HIST 4900 Senior Seminar (4 sem. hours).

An examination of how history is written and interpreted and of particular problems in history. May be taken by students who have two courses in history and is required for all history majors.

HIST HI–HII Honors Project 1 and 2 (1–4 sem. hours).

Offered occasionally.