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Spring 2014 Core Courses

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Core 1: Freshman/Transfer Seminar in Critical Thinking and Academic Literacy

IDST-1050-01:  Writing Ecologically and the Ecology of Writing
Instructor: Richard Boada     TTH 10 W 12
Poet A.R. Ammons writes, “we are not alone in language: we may be alone in words, at least, almost alone in speaking them, not alone in understanding them.” The written word is itself one of the greatest barriers between the human and the non-human, and one may argue that the use of words is a defining characteristic of what it means to be human.  From the moment humans began to speak and write about the natural world in which they lived, they engaged in the act of giving voice to that which had none.  At the same time, language is one of our greatest tools for articulating, understanding and fostering our relationship to that which is non-human.  In this course we will explore concepts of Ecology, as the study of living organisms and their relationship to environment, and we will also explore how individuals write about, talk about, and depict their relationships with the environment, whether natural, human constructed, or a hybrid of the two. This course will draw from a selection of texts, including essays, poetry, fiction and films, which challenge us to think about the human and non-human spheres writers occupy, how they locate themselves in texts, and how they use words and language to effectively write about the environment. 


Core 2-5: The Heritage Program

IDST 1128: Heritage of the West in World Perspective  MW 1-2:15  TTH 9
Beginning with antiquity and continuing to the present, this program brings together history, literature, philosophy, religion, and the arts in an integrated approach to the study of Western culture within a global context. It is the equivalent of eight semester hours each semester, and extends throughout the year. In the spring, this course examines developments in Western culture from 1500 to present in the context of world history.  IDST 1128 is open only to students who have completed IDST 1118 in the fall. All students will be assigned to the same section and professor as in the fall. Heritage meets the Fine Arts requirements as well as the requirements of Core 2-5. Enrollment is limited to freshmen.
 Section 01:  Instructor: Dr. James Bowley    MWF 9
 Section 02: Instructor: Dr. David Davis    MWF 9
 Section 03: Instructor: Dr.  Kristen Golden   MWF 9
 Section 04:  Instructor: Dr. Anne MacMaster   MWF 9
 Section 05:  Instructor: Dr. James Bowley    MWF 11
 Section 06:  Instructor: Dr. David Davis    MWF 11
 Section 07:  Instructor: Dr. Kristen Golden    MWF 11
 Section 08: Instructor: Dr. Anne MacMaster   MWF 11

 

Core 3: Introduction to the Pre-modem World

IDST-1300-01:  Gods of Medieval Myth         
Instructor: Dr. Michael Gleason    MTWF 9
Examining Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Norse, Sanskrit, and Chinese texts, this course explores spirituality and religious belief as they are portrayed in some of the world's most challenging and influential works of literature. By asking, "What is myth?" and "What is God?" we hope to determine how pre-modern societies viewed the proper relationship between the human and the divine and what we have inherited of their view. In addition to grand questions of fate, mortality, and justice, we also consider conventions of literary form, including the elements of epic and lyric, tradition and innovation, prose and poetry, anonymity and fame. This course concentrates upon literatures which reached their final forms between c. 600 and 1600 C.E., although the texts may reflect religious sensibilities that are far older.
Focus: Literature and Religion

IDST-1300-02:  Gods of Medieval Myth         
Instructor: Dr. Michael Gleason    MWF 10 TH 8
Examining Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Norse, Sanskrit, and Chinese texts, this course explores spirituality and religious belief as they are portrayed in some of the world's most challenging and influential works of literature. By asking, "What is myth?" and "What is God?" we hope to determine how pre-modern societies viewed the proper relationship between the human and the divine and what we have inherited of their view. In addition to grand questions of fate, mortality, and justice, we also consider conventions of literary form, including the elements of epic and lyric, tradition and innovation, prose and poetry, anonymity and fame. This course concentrates upon literatures which reached their final forms between c. 600 and 1600 C.E., although the texts may reflect religious sensibilities that are far older.
Focus: Literature and Religion

IDST 1300-04: 1492
Instructor: Dr. Eric Griffin      MWF 11 TH 9
This course will consider the inter-relation of the three major historical events of 1492 - Columbus's landfall in the New World, the expulsion of the Jews from the Spanish kingdoms, and the fall of Muslim Granada - by observing both the long-standing cultural tensions that produce them, and the new tensions that arise in their wake. While we will consider later interpretations, most of our readings will be either from accounts written by the participants themselves, or slightly later works which both draw upon these accounts and transform them fictively. Our readings will include European voices and the voices of Europe's Jewish, Islamic, and Native American "Others." We will also consider how the Protestant Reformation complicates an already complex situation by multiplying differences within Christendom itself. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 3750 (LAST 3750)
Foci: Literature and History

IDST-1300-05:  Diabology: The Devil and the Demonic in Medieval thought         
Instructor: Dr. Bennie Reynolds III    TTH 10  W 12
The Devil. Satan. Mephistopheles. Beelzebub. The Prince of Darkness. These are just a few of the names we use to describe pure personified evil. For many, the figure functions as a real entity that interacts with us in the world. For others it is an idea no different than the tooth fairy. But where did the Devil come from? For the western world, the origin of the devil lies in the ancient Near East. But many of the most pervasive and influential ideas about the devil were formed in Medieval Europe. In this course we’ll delve into that world and investigate how history, religion, and culture intersected to form concepts that exercise significant influence today. We’ll navigate literature, art, and theology from Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in our quest to understand the Devil and the Demonic.
Focus: Religion

IDST-1300-06:  Chaos or Community in Medieval Christianity         
Instructor: Dr. Shelli Poe     TTH 1-2:40
Nowadays there are hundreds of Christian denominations: Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran, Reformed (Presbyterian, Congregationalist, United Church of Christ, Disciples of Christ), Mennonite, Episcopal/Anglican, Baptist (General Conference, Southern, National Convention, Primitive, American, Free Will), Pentecostal (Church of God in Christ, Assemblies of God), Methodist (African, Free, Southern, Union American, United), and more! Listing just a few is enough to make your head spin! Why are there so many different denominations, and how did they proliferate so plentifully? In this course, we’ll investigate the two major divisions within the Christian Church that led to all this chaos (the East-West split of 1054, and the Reformation of the 16th century). Using these as focal points, we’ll consider larger questions like whether diversity might actually be a good thing after all, and how unity might be maintained along with difference. You’ll be able to apply these considerations to the larger context of religious pluralism: Could diversity of religious traditions (Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Buddhist, etc.) actually be a really good thing? This course offers you the opportunity to expand your horizons and challenge yourself to consider the benefits and burdens of chaos and community.
Focus: Religion

IDST 1300-03: 1492
Instructor: Dr. Eric Griffin     TTH 10  W 12
This course will consider the inter-relation of the three major historical events of 1492 - Columbus's landfall in the New World, the expulsion of the Jews from the Spanish kingdoms, and the fall of Muslim Granada - by observing both the long-standing cultural tensions that produce them, and the new tensions that arise in their wake. While we will consider later interpretations, most of our readings will be either from accounts written by the participants themselves, or slightly later works which both draw upon these accounts and transform them fictively. Our readings will include European voices and the voices of Europe's Jewish, Islamic, and Native American "Others." We will also consider how the Protestant Reformation complicates an already complex situation by multiplying differences within Christendom itself. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 3750. (LAST 3750-02)
Foci: Literature and History

Core 5: Introduction to the Contemporary World

IDST 2500-01:  Postmodernism: Media and Social Movements in the Twentieth Century
Instructor: Dr. Stephanie Rolph    MTWF 9
This class will use the social movements and trends of the post-World War II world as a lens to postmodernism. The experience of World War II created palpable tensions between conformity and individuality. Challenges to racial structures, communism and democracy, an emerging Third World, gender, and all varieties of confrontations appeared on televisions around the world. The postmodern reality became unreality. Populations became so intimate as to become strangers. So many versions of “us” appeared that “us” disappeared. We will spend the semester marking the intersection of historical events that defined the post-World War II world and analyzing how those events destroyed unifying ideologies.
Focus: History and Philosophy

IDST 2500-02:  Dramatic Genders            
Instructor: Dr. Shane Grant     MW 1-2:40
Do men write women differently than women write women? Do women write men differently than men write men? How do representations of gender vary depending on the author's intended audience? Is for-profit theatre more likely to promote stereotypes of both women and men? How do issues of race inform dramatic representations of gender? This course addresses those questions by examining 20th century American dramatic literature. The course begins with a brief unit on early American "masters" but will primarily interrogate plays from the last few decades of the 20th century. Potential authors include Tennessee Williams, Lorraine Hansberry, David Mamet, and Paula Vogel.     
Foci: Fine Arts and Literature

IDST 2500-03:  Guts, Ghosts & Glory: The Writing of the Spanish Civil War            
Instructor: Dr. Emily Eaton     TTH 10  W 12
Is history written exclusively by the winners? Not in the case of the Spanish Civil War, the country’s 1936-1939 clash between fascism and republicanism. From Pablo Picasso’s Guernica to George Orwell’s Homage to Catalonia and Guillermo del Toro’s Pan’s Labyrinth, the most well known and critically acclaimed works about this conflict are largely sympathetic to the leftist forces who ultimately suffered defeat. By engaging with a variety of textual genres and visual media represented in part by the above examples, we’ll explore how the Spanish Civil War has been “written” by both the vanquished and the victors, in Spain and elsewhere. Through formal essays and informal exercises, we’ll hone our writing and critical-thinking skills as we analyze how our source materials (de)construct boundaries between truth/fiction, history/myth, and heroism/villainy.     
Focus: Literature

IDST 2500-04:  Protest, Propaganda, and the Power of Music                 
Instructor: Dr. H. Lynn Raley     TTH 1-2:40 
This course will explore how music can reflect both social justice issues and its flip side: propaganda. It will include early American song (Billings, Hopkinson, Ives), jazz (Ellington, Mingus, Abbey Lincoln's Freedom Now Suite, Marc Blitzstein, Billie Holiday), and classical (Aaron Copland, John Adams, Frederic Rzewski), as well as Chinese propaganda music (and Cui Jian's protest rock).
Focus: Fine Arts

 

Core 6: Topics in Social and Behavioral Science

IDST 1610-01: Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Instructor: Dr. Stacy DeZutter    MW 1-2:40 
Human development permeates every aspect of our lives from our own individuation to our families, our work, and the rearing of our children. One can argue that all the compartmentalized studies of the social and behavioral sciences have as a source of origin human growth and development. It encompasses one's entire experience within this world.  Human Development in Cross-Cultural Perspective demands an immediate and personal perspective, as well as a multi-disciplinary approach including such disciplines as psychology, biology, sociology, anthropology, education, and others. 

ECON 1000-01: Principles of Economics
Section 01:  Instructor: Dr. Patrick Taylor  MW 1-2:40   
Section 02:  Instructor: Dr. Blakely Fender  MW 2:45-4:00 
Section 03: Instructor: Dr. Patrick Taylor  W 6:30-9

PLSC 1000-01: Introduction to American Government  Instructor: Dr. Michael Reinhard  TTH 10

PSYC 1000-01: Introduction to Psychology    Instructor: Dr. Sabrina Grondhuis   MTWF 9

PSYC 1100-01:Love and Human Sexuality    Instructor: Dr. Kurt Thaw   TTH 2:45

SOAN 1000-01: Introduction to Sociology    Instructor: Dr. Louwanda Evans  MWF 9

SOAN 1100-01: Introduction to Anthropology   Instructor: Dr. Julian Murchison  MWF 10

 

Core 7 or 9: Topics in Natural Science with Labratory

Note: This is a 4 cr. requirement. All labs (1 cr.) and lectures (3 cr.) are co-requisite courses and must be taken in the same semester.

BIOL 1003-01: Introductory Cell Biology (3 cr.)   Instructor: Dr. Sabrice Guerrier  MWF 8

BIOL 1001-01: Introductory Cell Biology Lab (1 cr.)   Instructor: Dr. Sabrice Guerrier  T 1-4

BIOL 1013-01: General Botany (3 cr.) Instructor: Dr. Debora Mann   MWF 8

BIOL 1011-01: General Botany Lab (1 cr.)    Instructor: Dr. Debora Mann   T 1-4 

BIOL 1023: Zoology (3 cr.)  
Section 01:  Instructor: Dr. Brent Hendrixson MWF 9
Section 02:  Instructor: Dr. Markus Tellkamp MWF 10

BIOL 1021: Zoology Lab (1 cr.)  
Section 01:  Instructor: Dr. Brent Hendrixson M 1-4
Section 02:  Instructor: Dr. Markus Tellkamp TH 1-4

CHEM 1221:  General Inorganic Chemistry II Lab (1 cr.)
Section 01:  Instructor: Dr. Cory Toyota    M 1-4  
Section 02:  Instructor: Dr. Karen Ward  T 1-4
Section 03: Instructor: Dr. Lee Maggio  W 1-4 
Section 04:  Instructor: Dr. Lee Maggio  TH 1-4

CHEM 1223: General Inorganic Chemistry II (3 cr.)
Section 01:  Instructor: Dr. Timothy Ward  MWF 9
Section 02:  Instructor: Dr. Cory Toyota  MWF 10
Section 03:  Instructor: Dr. Kristina Stensaas MWF 11
Section 04:  Instructor: Dr. Lee Maggio  TTH 10

GEOL 1000-01: The Physical Earth (4 cr.)   Instructor: Dr. Jamie Harris   MWF 9, W 1-4

GEOL 1300-01: Human and Natural Disasters (4 cr.) Instructor: Dr. Stan Galicki   MWF 11, M 1  

 GEOL 2000-01: Plate Tectonics and Earth History (4 cr.) Instructor: Dr. Zach Musselman  MWF 10, T 1

PHYS 1011-01: General Physics II Lab (1 cr.)   Instructor: Dr. Shadow Robinson  W 1-4

PHYS 1013-01: General Physics II (3 cr.)   Instructor: Dr. Shadow Robinson  MWF  9

PHYS 1211-01: College Physics II Lab (1 cr.)   
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Asif Khandker  T 1-4 
Section 02:  Instructor: Dr. Gulhan Gurdal  M 1-4

PHYS 1213-01: College Physics II (3 cr.)   
Section 01: Instructor: Dr. Asif Khandker  MWF 11
Section 02:  Instructor: Dr. Gulhan Gurdal  MWF 9

 

Core 8: Topics in Mathematics (fulfills Core 8 only)

MATH 1000-01: Topics in Mathematics   Instructor: Dr. Shadow Robinson  MWF 10 TH 8

MATH 1130-01: Elementary Functions
Section 01:  Instructor: Prof. Gayla Dance  MTWF 9
Section 02:  Instructor: Prof. Gayla Dance  MWF 10  TH 8

MATH 1150-01: Elementary Statistics
Section 01:  Instructor: Prof. Gayla Dance  TTH 10  W 12
Section 02:  Instructor: Staff   MW 1
Section 03:  Instructor: Staff   MW 2:45

MATH 1210, 1220, 2230 or 2310 (specific class information listed below)

 

Core 8 or 9: Topics in Mathematics, Natural Science, or Computer Science

MATH 1210-01: Survey of Calculus    Instructor:  Prof. Tracy Sullivan  MWF 10  TH 8

MATH 1220: Analytical Geometry/ Calculus I
Section 01:  Instructor: Dr. Emlee Nicholson  MTWF 9
Section 02: Instructor: Dr. Emlee Nicholson  MWF 10 TH 8
Section 03: Instructor: Prof. Tracy Sullivan  MWF 11 TH 9

MATH 2230-01: Analytical Geometry/ Calculus II  Instructor: Dr. Yan Wang   TTH 10 W12

MATH 2240-01: Analytical Geometry/ Calculus III  Instructor: Prof. Tracy Sullivan  TTH 10 W12

 

Core 9: Topics in Mathematics, Natural Science, or Computer Science (Core 9 only)

CSCI 1020-01: Computer Science II    Instructor: Dr. Yan Wang   MWF 11  TH 9

ASTR 1000-01: Astronomy      Instructor: Dr. Shadow Robinson  MWF 10 TH 8

Fine Arts Requirement

In addition to completing the requisite Core courses, all students must demonstrate proficiency in the fine arts in one of the following ways:
• Any IDST course with a Fine Arts focus;
• The two semester Heritage sequence;
• Completing four semesters of private study of voice, an instrument, or class piano
• Completing four hours in Singers;
• Significant participation in four Millsaps Players productions will satisfy the fine arts requirement;
• Any of the courses listed below  will meet the Fine Arts requirements this spring

Spring 2014 Courses the Fulfill the Fine Arts Requirement

ARTS 2200-01: Beginning Drawing      Instructor: Prof. Jonathan Metzger M 1-4 W 2

ARTS 2200-01: Beginning Printmaking     Instructor: Prof. Jonathan Metzger TH 1-4 W 3

ARTS 2200-01: Beginning Digital Arts     Instructor: Prof. Brandon Barr TH 1-4 W 3

ARTS 2200-01: Italian Renaissance Art     Instructor: Dr. Elise Smith  MWF 11 TH 9

MUSC 1002-01: Music at the Computer (2 cr.)    Instructor: Dr. Tim Coker  MWF 10

MUSC 2122-01: Age of Enlightenment (2 cr.)     Instructor: Dr. Rachel Heard  MW 1

MUSC 2150-01: Wagner--Sensual Love and Philosophy in Music  Instructor: Dr. Tim Coker  TTH 2:45-4

MUSC 2132-01: Women and Music (2 cr.)     Instructor: Dr. Cheryl Coker  TTH 1

THEA 1500-01: Acting One: Foundations in Realism   Instructor: Dr. Shane Grant  TTH 1-2:40

THEA 2800-01: Topics in Dramatic Literature: Dramatic Genders  Instructor: Dr. Shane Grant  MW 1-2:40