The Bachelor of Business Administration degree offers majors in either Accounting or business administration. The B.B.A. degree curriculum provides students an educational base for a lifetime of learning. You will learn to look at organizations from the perspective of management with global awareness, the ability to work with others to accomplish common goals, and to collect and analyze appropriate data for decision making. Millsaps B.B.A. curriculum emphasizes: standards of professional behavior that are consistent with ethical precepts; leadership development, and understanding changes agents in technology; the political and legal climates; and culture and how they may affect the organization.

The B.B.A. academic program is a three-year, integrated body of study. Courses are sequenced so that each is taught with the assumption that students in the class have a common academic background. To insure educational diversity, at least 50 percent (usually 64 or more semester hours) must be non-business courses.

All Else School of Management at Millsaps College major programs are accredited by AACSB International.

  • Diane F. Baker

    Diane F. Baker

    Professor of Management

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    B.S., Concordia College; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma

    "My primary interest is in group and organizational behavior. I teach management, group behavior, leadership, and human resource management. I like to engage students in the learning process, so I rely on a highly interactive approach to case studies, group exercises, simulations, movie clips, role plays, etc. I draw from current issues of the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, and other sources to explore how the topics from class play out in the world. My research interests focus on group behavior and management education. I have published articles in journals such as Small Group Research, Academy of Management Learning and Education, and Journal of Management Education."

  • Bill M. Brister—Millsaps College

    Bill M. Brister

    Assistant Professor of Finance

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    B.S., M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Arkansas

    "Hello. I’m Bill Brister and I teach finance here at Millsaps. Right after I received my M.B.A. at USM, the Dean there asked if I would teach a class in Business Statistics. Having no other job at the time, I agreed. From the first class I taught I knew that I had found by vocational passion. I continued on with my education and earned a Ph.D. and started teaching at Millsaps in 1989. I love the classroom and teaching, particularly here at Millsaps.

    "In my finance classes we talk about a host of interesting topics such as: MONEY, personal investment, interest rates, the stock market, the bond market, and dividend policy. OK, OK, maybe most of these topics do not sound very interesting, but MONEY is interesting.

    "I also do a good bit of consulting in the area of litigation support. Like the classroom, I like testifying in court as an expert witness. Sometimes it is nerve-racking, and I must be on my toes at all times, but the excitement of the competitive nature of the courtroom is very exciting."

  • Damon E. Campbell

    Damon E. Campbell

    Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems

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    Kelly Gene Cook, Sr., Chair of Business Administration, Director of the M.B.A. Program; B.A., Lewis Clark State College; M.B.A., Ph.D., Washington State University

    "I teach applied topics in the professional school of business (i.e., Information Systems, Analytics, and Survey of Management). The rewarding issue with my style of teaching involves the high balance of teaching the requisite explicit knowledge as well as offer ways for students to gain as much tacit knowledge as possible in a contrived academic setting. "Tacit knowledge is subconsciously understood and applied, difficult to articulate, developed from direct experience and action, and usually shared through highly interactive conversation, storytelling, and shared experience." (Zack 1999) With this type of knowledge, experts are able to know what they don't know, when rules don't apply, as well as make fine distinctions, recognize patterns, recognize context, extrapolate, and make decisions quickly. (Leonard and Swap 2005) This type of knowledge is difficult to teach and subsequently assess in a classroom. "In contrast, explicit knowledge is more precisely and formally articulated, although removed from the original context of creation or use." (Zack 1999) This type of knowledge is fairly commonly encountered in standard classrooms (e.g., reading a textbook and taking a standard exam). However, when challenged to apply explicit knowledge (e.g., complete a case analysis) students soon find it requires an unanticipated level of mastery and tacit knowledge. Thus explicit knowledge is prerequisite in many instances to gaining tacit knowledge. In my classes, I try to give them as much OJT (On-the-Job-Training) as I can by putting students in as many real world (or closer to real world) situations as I can."

  • Harvey L. Fiser—Millsaps College

    Harvey L. Fiser

    Associate Professor of Business Law

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    B.A., Mississippi State University; J.D., Mississippi College School of Law

    "I left a partnership at a law firm to join the Millsaps faculty, and I have never looked back. This vocation allows me to be who I am and to meet students where they are. Our minds meet to analyze a challenge and, in that work, we all learn. It’s an extraordinary adventure.

    "I get the chance to work closely with students, helping them learn how to critically analyze problems and work through solutions. Probably the most enjoyable part of my classes is also one of the most dreaded—that moment when I pose a question to the class, and someone provides a "correct" answer from the book, only to realize that the correct answer is just the start of the conversation, and one that often includes an open debate and the degrees of "correctness" of the answer.

    "The study of law is an ideal fit at Millsaps. Since there are rarely legal issues which are no longer up for debate or analysis, I focus on exploring the limits of law and policy, and I challenge students to debate these issues openly and to be prepared to defend their positions both in and out of class. A yes or no to a question is only the beginning of the response!

    "For example, with Mock Trial students, I insist that there is no manual on how to handle all cases from beginning to end, and no one can have all of the knowledge of the many areas in which you may be called to practice. As our Mock Trial team members have learned, one case may be about scuba diving and nitrogen narcosis while the next may be exploring fraudulent accounting records of a questionable amusement theme park. Or, in one of my favorite classes is "From Minds to Markets," taught in the Yucatan each summer, I work with a philosophy professor to guide the class through the crowded streets of Merida, Mexico, asking them to note the unusual or curious. From those exercises, the class works as a team to use those ideas to create new products or services—often far outside of the current knowledge of our class. Through research, creative thinking, and critical analysis of ideas, the class culminates in a final "product pitch" of their new creations and the students have gained valuable insight into exploring new cultures.

    "Whether on our study abroad classes in Yucatan or Europe, in a Mock Trial case, while developing a new class, exploring new research interests, or in a normal everyday classroom discussion, I value intellectual curiosity. At Millsaps, students demonstrate their intellectual curiosity in delightful ways and, for me, that’s the best part of this extraordinary adventure we call Millsaps."

  • Michael Ray Grubbs—Millsaps College

    Michael Ray Grubbs

    Professor of Management

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    B.S., Millsaps College; M.B.A., Mississippi College; Ph.D., University of Mississippi

    "I am a 1973 graduate of Millsaps with a degree in Psychology and joined the faculty of the Else School of Management in January of 1987. I have been a member of this community for most of my adult life giving me first hand knowledge of the value of being associated with a College such as Millsaps.

    "In my classroom, I like to blend theory and practice, the perspective I bring to teaching. I have observed over the years that a deep dive into theory is the best way to teach a practitioner about improving their practice of management. Many times I find that a practitioner limits their perspective on a problem or issue in business because they do not have a sufficiently broad and deep understanding of the theory that shapes their views. So, a student of mine can expect a blending of theory and practice in class.

    "My industry experience is primarily in banking, having worked for banks either as an employee, consultant or board member since I was 17 years old. I continue to consult to the banking industry and serve on the Board of First Commercial Bank in Jackson and Chair the Bank’s Risk Management Committee. I also serve as a member of the Bank’s Asset Liability Management Committee as well as the Trust Committee. One of my most significant professional accomplishments was participating in the group that originated First Commercial Bank in October 2000.

    "In addition to my banking background, I have consulted with a wide range of private sector, non-for-profit and governmental organizations over the past 30 years. I have many relevant stories to tell about this work in the classroom.

    "I have become interested in two very different pursuits over the past 5 years. One is working with Boards to improve their governance of institutions. This work has resulted in my work with the Millsaps Board of Trustees as they seek to become an even stronger institution in pursuit of Millsaps’ mission. The other pursuit is the formation of Modern Retirement Theory with a colleague of mine, Jason Branning. We have developed this new approach to retirement planning that has been widely recognized as a comprehensive planning framework and have been recognized as thought leaders among proponents of the Safety-First school of thought."

  • Jake Hoskins

    Jake Hoskins

    Assistant Professor of Marketing

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    B.A., California State University, Chico; Ph.D., University of Utah

    After brief stints in retail management (Walgreens) and financial services (UBS Financial), Dr. Jake D. Hoskins received his Ph.D. in Business Administration with emphasis in Marketing from the University of Utah in May of 2015. His dissertation received The Monty & Christine Botosan Bridge to Practice Doctoral Thesis Award and was a runner up in the University of Illinois at Chicago-Product Development Management Association Dissertation Proposal Speed Funding Competition.

    His research interests include product management, retailing, and marketing strategy. His research has been published in the Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services and has been presented at the INFORMS Society for Marketing Science Conference, Academy of Management Annual Meeting, and the Strategic Management Society Conference.

    He teaches Principles of Marketing, Marketing Management, and Marketing Research.

  • Walter P. Neely

    Walter P. Neely

    Professor of Finance

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    B.S., M.B.A., Mississippi State University; Ph.D., University of Georgia

    Walter Neely is a Chartered Financial Analyst. His teaching interests include corporate finance, portfolio management, international finance, and the Wilson Fund. His research interests include portfolio management, corporate finance, and valuation of closely held firms. He has selected publications in the Journal of Applied Business Research, Financial Review, International Journal of Finance, and Financial Management.

  • Penelope Prenshaw

    Penelope J. Prenshaw

    Professor of Marketing

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    B.S., M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Houston

    "I have great passion for my chosen field of study, which I try to demonstrate in every class session. My marketing profession, too, provides me with many avenues for displaying an enthusiasm for learning that makes for an interesting classroom experience. We are surrounded by marketers' creations in the form of advertisements, websites, and brand images competing for our attention and our dollars. Marketers filter much of what we learn about the world, such as when we see images of rich or beautiful people in TV commercials or magazines. Ads show us how the mass culture expects us to act and what merchandisers hope to convince us to purchase.

    "To involve my students with the subject matter requires a curriculum design that emphasizes the use of experiential learning. I often employ class projects that require the students to "get out in the real world" to solve marketing-related problems. My teaching strategy is based upon the fundamental premise that the classroom can be a rewarding and exciting place. Emphasizing participation provides an environment that encourages creative thought and convergence of ideas with marketing skills. Class participation provides the students with the opportunity to develop skills in presenting points of view and in listening; these skills are as valuable as the "techniques" discussed during the course."

  • Caitlin Sockbeson

    Caitlin Sockbeson

    Assistant Professor of Management

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    "My research interests lie in the realm of organizational behavior, particularly at the individual level. Most of my research focuses on gender and diversity at work or feedback and performance management, and I have published articles in the Journal of Management and The Academy of Management Annals. Before pursuing my Ph.D., I worked for several years in the publishing industry. I draw on this experience in class and encourage my students to relate their own organizational experiences to the topics we discuss. My classes focus on academic content in a practical way, while also fostering collaborative learning, discussion, and dialogue. Class participation is an integral part of my course design because the more students can tie the material to their own experiences, and teach and learn from each other, the longer the knowledge will stay with them. My classes also incorporate team projects, to prepare students for today’s collaborative work environments. My students learn from quality textbooks, but also recent articles, videos, and/or podcasts to connect course topics to current events. I teach management, organizational behavior, and human resource management."