The film studies minor provides an overview of cultural and practical issues in film art. Five courses are required, each of which must be approved by the director of the minor: an introduction to film history and theory, a course that is a more specialized study of a particular film genre, a course in screenwriting or production, plus two additional director-approved courses. Film-related internships are often available in the Jackson area with the Mississippi Film Office and Crossroads Film Festival.

Minor in Film Studies

Five courses are required, all to be approved by the director of the concentration.

Students must take an introduction to film history and theory, normally those classes listed below. Choose one of the following courses.

  • COMM 2100 History of the Media (C- or higher)
  • ENGL 3540 Film Studies (C- or higher)
  • PHIL 2250 Philosophy of Film (C- or higher)

Students must take a more specialized study of particular film genres, directors, or issues, which may be the following course.

  • ENGL 3540 Film Studies (C- or higher)

    This course will consider the cultural and artistic significance of film. The content of the course will vary, potentially emphasizing such issues as the relationship between film and another genre, films of a particular period or style, or the history of film.

Students must take a course in screenwriting or production, which may be the courses listed below, which may be the following course.

  • ENGL 3760 Special Projects in Writing (C- or higher)

Students must take two additional courses, as approved by the director.

  • XXXX #### (C- or higher)
  • XXXX #### (C- or higher)

Various Millsaps courses may be adapted to meet these requirements, all to be approved by a Director of the minor.

  • Steven Smith

    Steven G. Smith

    Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Jennie Carlisle Golding Chair in Philosophy
    Director, Film Studies

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    Bio

    B.A., Florida State University; M.A., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., Duke University

    "I have the good fortune to belong to two great departments, philosophy and religious studies. There's an endlessly interesting interaction between the things I learn in these two fields, but my purposes are quite distinct: in philosophy I want to see what can be figured out just by the free exercise of reason, while in religious studies I deal with the experiences, practices, and spiritually potent thoughts of actual individuals and historical communities.

    "My specialty is philosophy of religion, but in the liberal arts college context I've had the opportunity to explore and teach in many related subjects, including the history of Western philosophy; philosophy of human nature; ethics; aesthetics and philosophy of film; religion and science; religious ethics; and the history of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim thought. My historical and cultural awareness has grown immensely as a result of teaching in the Millsaps humanities core, both in the Heritage program and in the Topics course sequence.

    "I teach because I want to learn and be in conversation, especially about viable ideal standards of realness and goodness. (Platonic Forms? Perhaps!) Outside of active inquiry, knowledge isn't alive. Outside of conversation, ideas are dull and untrustworthy. One has to test one's understanding of anything by trying to share it with others. Together we have to test the way we live by trying to apply our best ideas. For me, every class is a fellowship dedicated to these principles."