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Faculty

Department of Psychology

 

Dr. A. Kurt Thaw - Behavioral NeuroscientistDr. A. Kurt Thaw - Behavioral Neuroscientist
Department Chair

Dr. A. Kurt Thaw received his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Florida State University in 1994.  He received NIH funding to continue his research as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Virginia (1994-1996) and The Weill Cornell Medical College (1997-1998) where he examined the effects of peripheral taste and satiety signals on eating behavior and development.  Dr. Thaw has since become interested in not only the factors that contribute to hunger and satiety, but also in weightloss and obesity prevention.  Living in Mississippi with his wife and 3 daughters has been a great fit for Dr. Thaw, as he is a huge fan of the outdoors and warm weather.  Dr. Thaw has family in Georgia, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania and Delaware and has the curious distinction of having had all of his daughters in different states. 
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Dr. Melissa Lea - Cognitive Psychologist/Cognitive ScientistDr. Melissa Lea - Cognitive Psychologist/Cognitive Scientist

Dr. Lea is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and the Director of the Neuroscience and Cognitive Studies program at Millsaps College.  She earned her B.S. in Cognitive Science from the University of Michigan - Flint in 1999 and her Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology/Science from Miami University in 2005.  Her areas of expertise are in face perception and categorization.  While at Millsaps Dr. Lea has branched out and has been studying food perception and food behaviors that lead to eating disorders, as well as how social roles influence team cohesion in athletics. 
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Dr. Kathryn Hahn - Clinical PsychologistDr. Kathryn Hahn - Clinical Psychologist

Kathryn S. Hahn, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at Millsaps College.  Her clinical specialty and teaching focus on the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral intersect of psychopathology.  She has authored several articles and professional presentations related to the role of information processing biases and emotional dysregulation in the development and maintenance of anxiety and depression.  She enjoys inspiring student interest in the science and application of psychology. 
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